Posts Tagged ‘baby bok choy’

Sunday, February 3rd: Milk (Cow & Goat), Eggs (Chicken & Duck), Carrots (Sweet & Delicious), Succulents (Beautiful & Drought Resistant) & Other Wonderful Stuff!

February 3, 2013
Bottled cows milk from Twin Oaks Creamery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bottled cows milk from Twin Oaks Creamery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Did you get a chance to meet our newest farm last Sunday at your Ballard Farmers Market? If not, let me introduce you to Twin Oaks Creamery. Twin Oaks, meet Ballard. Twin Oaks is a small, family-owned and operated dairy farm in Chehalis that manages both dairy goats and cows. And they bring with them to Ballard the return pasteurized bottled milk from both, as well as fresh and aged cheeses, and soon, yogurt. Their milk is whole milk, not homogenized, so it is real milk, and it is delicious! We’ve been without pasteurized milk since September, and we are very excited about the arrival of Twin Oaks. So come meet your local dairy farmers today, and tomorrow, you can have a super bowl of cereal with delicious local milk! (Did you see what I did there?)

Chicken (top) and duck eggs from Stokesberry Sustainable Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chicken (top) and duck eggs from Stokesberry Sustainable Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

In years past, we’ve been lean on eggs at your Ballard Farmers Market this time of year. But not this year. In fact, our egg producers are flush with eggs right now, and for the first time in months, they actually didn’t sell out of eggs this past Sunday. So, if you’re one of those folks who has simply given up hope of getting farm-fresh eggs on Sunday afternoon, because you just can’t drag yourself down to your Ballard Farmers Market before 1:30 p.m., this is your winter! Fear not. And get thee down here today. These lovely eggs (above) are from Stokesberry Sustainable Farm. The white ones are duck eggs and the brown ones are chicken eggs. And just so’s you know I ain’t just blowing smoke, I took this photo last Sunday at — wait for it — 3 p.m.! Just sayin’.

February's Tamale-of-the-Month from Patty Pan Grill. Photo courtesy Patty Pan Grill.

February’s Tamale-of-the-Month from Patty Pan Grill. Photo courtesy Patty Pan Grill.

Patty Pan Grill just launched at the new year a great new program of offering seasonal tamales that changes each month. Made with great local ingredients, you can take them home to cook or eat them here. February’s offering is Caramelized Onion, Goat Cheese & Olsen Farms Potato Tamales. Stop by and grab some today, because February is a short month!

Nash's Best Carrots from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nash’s Best Carrots from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

There’s a reason why they call them Nash’s Best Carrots. They are really good carrots! And Nash’s Organic Produce has lots of them… but not for long. In fact, I hear that they may only last through next Sunday’s market. But they keep incredibly well in your fridge, so stock up today. Then you’ll have them for soups, salads, juices, root roasts, stews and more for the rest of the winter. But if you dillydally, you’re gonna miss them until the next harvest begins weeks from now.

Succulent chicks from Phocas Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Succulent chicks from Phocas Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Just up the road from Nash’s, a little west in Port Angeles, is Phocas Farms. They seem to mysteriously disappear from your Ballard Farmers Market every fall, but it is really no mystery at all. Fall is when the saffron harvest happens, and Jimmy puts all of his attention into plucking, cleaning and drying every delicate thread of saffron all day long for two or three months. Then he shifts his attention to transferring the fall’s crop of succulent chicks from their parents into small pots to get all set and ready for coming back to your Ballard Farmers Market… TODAY! So if you are developing a gardening itch already, but you realize it is still too early to plant most other stuff, get you some succulents from Phocas Farms today, get them in the ground, and then they will be all ready to do what they do best come summer, which is to flourish despite your neglect and weeks without rain!

Baby baby bok choy from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Baby baby bok choy from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

From the department of redundancy department comes baby baby bok choy from Stoney Plains Organic Farm in Tenino. These are the most delicate of baby shoots of the vegetable that is correctly known as baby bok choy. See, baby bok choy is not baby bok choy. They are completely different beasts. So, in this case, these really are baby baby bok choy. And perhaps the most fascinating thing is how long I can go on with this inane discussion with seemingly no shame. But never you mind that. Get yourself some of this deliciousness today! Toss in hot pan with olive oil and garlic. Give a quick toss or two. Done. You can thank me later. Just don’t come too late looking for these, as they’ll sell out early. (Oh, and Terry, please save me some, eh? Thanks!)

D'Anjou pears from Booth Canyon Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

D’Anjou pears from Booth Canyon Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Today is the last day for Booth Canyon Orchard for the season. They will exhaust today their 2012 fall harvest of heirloom apples and pears, like these D’Anjou pears, and they will retire to the Methow Valley to prune trees (or, if they’re smart, they’ll spend a week or three in Mexico) in preparation for their triumphant return next September. So stop by, stock up, thank them for feeding us so well, and send them on their way with a hug!

Canned local albacore tuna in a variety of flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Canned local albacore tuna in a variety of flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s the first Sunday of the month, and that means our monthly visit from Fishing Vessel St. Jude with the finest cannedsmokedfrozendried, and just generally delicious local albacore tuna you’ll find anywhere. Remember, it’s low in mercury and high in beneficial omega-fatty acids, because this is adolescent tuna from the North Pacific. So stock up for the month, as we won’t see them again until March 3rd!

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, August 28th: Last Chance to Vote For Ballard Farmers Market & Lots of Sexy Photos of Produce and Stuff!

August 28, 2011

Roy Nettlebeck, owner of Tahuya River Apiaries, has something sweet to smile about -- honey! Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I know. I told you last week of the triumphant return to your Ballard Farmers Market of Tahuya River Apiaries, but it bears repeating. See, in this whacky year we’ve all been enduring, even the honey bees have been thrown off kilter. The wildflowers they depend on to make honey have all come into bloom very, very late this year — the latest Roy Nettlebeck, owner of Tahuya River Apiaries, can remember. Yup, honey is seasonal! But that smile on Roy’s face, above, means he, and his honey, are back, baby, so it’s time to load up on those natural sweets for the sweet!

Oh, and it is also time to vote for your Ballard Farmers Market in the 2011 America’s Favorite Farmers Market Contest.  The deadline is August 31st. That is this coming Wednesday. And our vote count is way below last year’s! What are you waiting for? Vote now! Do it for us. We ask so little, and give so much. (Sorry, if I sound like your parents.)

Patriotic spuds from Nature's Last Stand. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nature’s Last Stand always has fun mixing up the red, white and blue potatoes they harvest. And you can have fun with them, too! Why not bring some red, white and blue potato salad to your Labor Day picnic this year, eh? That’ll get your friends talking!

Orange & purple carrots from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Speaking of colorful, check out these gorgeous orange and purple carrots from Boistfort Valley Farm. And they’re as tasty as they are beautiful. Hey, few things satisfy like a sweet, fresh, crunchy carrot, am I right people?

An impromptu bike rack erected by Olympic Health Club. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You may have noticed that our neighbors at the Olympic Health Club finally tore down that old garage next to their main gym in preparation for their expansion. And in the process, they erected a chain-link fence around the property for safety. But what really struck me last Sunday was how quickly all the bicyclists in the neighborhood recognized this fence for what it really is – a big, new bike rack! Yep. I mean, Ballard’s loaded with cyclists, and they love to ride to their Ballard Farmers Market. Problem is, Ballard lacks much in the way of proper bike racks. There had been talk between Sustainable Ballard and the City of Seattle about putting some of those high capacity bike racks in one or two of the current street parking spaces near the Market, but the City has back-burnered this plan during our economic downturn. Um, but wait! I thought the City was investing a whole lot in making Seattle more bicycle friendly, and now they want us to vote in November to add $60 per year to our car tab fees to pay for, in large part, improvements for transit, bicyclists and pedestrians. Hey, City of Seattle! You screwed us out of our monorail. You want us to vote for your tab fee? Then let’s see a guarantee that Ballard will finally get its share! We want bike racks and better transit service!

Golden raspberries from Hayton Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Look, ma! It’s golden raspberries from Hayton Farms! Oh, think of the possibilities. Jam that’ll confuse your family at the holidays. Berry desserts with like four or five different colors in it. Oh, what fun! But their season is short. Get ‘em now, while you can.

Baby bok choy (left) and bok choy (right) from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, I know some of you still don’t get the difference between baby bok choy and true bok choy, So I thought, with the help of the good folks at Nash’s Organic Produce, that I would give you a visual aid. See, they are two completely different plants. They look different. They taste different. They are different. Above, you will see baby bok choy on the left and bok choy on the right. Bok choy has white stems, and its leaves have white veins. Baby bok choy is a lighter green, and it is all green. Baby bok choy certainly bares a resemblance to bok choy, but so do lots of crops in the choi, or Chinese cabbage, family. It gets its name, “baby”, because of its smaller size at maturity. But, it is not the same.

Ginger gold apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is that time of year when the early apple varieties are coming in. And every week brings new varieties now, as these early varieties tend to have short seasons, and they also tend not to be grown in large numbers or have long storage lives. So, enjoy these ginger gold apples from ACMA Mission Orchards, and all the others, as you see them, because you won’t see them very long. Think of it as a game you can play, trying to sample every variety of apple there is as it comes into the Market. There are hundreds of kinds of apples. You will not get bored.

Cranberry beans from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ah, shelling beans. These cranberry beans from Stoney Plains represent the very first shelling beans of the season. And while you are likely used to working with dried or canned shelling beans, you have not truly enjoyed them until you have had them fresh! They are so tender and full of flavor, and they make for some outstanding succotash, great side dishes, and fantastic salads. And you can shell them and freeze them to enjoy the taste of fresh shelling beans all winter, too!

Yellow Romano beans from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

But we’re not done with our green beans yet, and these yellow Romano beans from Oxbow Farm are a true treat of summer. They are big and crunchy and just waiting for you to take them home. Woohoo! So many beans, so little time!

Beautiful bouquets from Pa Garden. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Don’t forget the flowers! We are getting into our late summer and fall flowers now, and Pa Garden has plenty of fabulous bouquets at great prices for you to bring home to brighten up the joint, or for you to brighten the day of someone special. Why spend money on flowers at the florist or Big Box store that aren’t fresh, aren’t from around here, and are too expensive, when you can get them fresh, local, affordable, and directly from the folks who grew them!

There is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now. And please remember to vote for your Ballard Farmers Market in the 2011 America’s Favorite Farmers Market Contest!

Sunday October 25th: Sweet Potatoes, Rutabagas, Colossal Squash & Pear Sorbet

October 25, 2009
Beautiful Beauregard sweet potatoes from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Beautiful Beauregard sweet potatoes from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Your eyes are not deceiving you. These really are sweet potatoes at the Ballard Farmers Market. Beauregard sweet potatoes from Lyall Farms, to be specific. Sweet potatoes are a tough crop to grow here, and until this month, no farm has brought sweet potatoes to any Seattle-area farmers market in recent memory, if ever. Besides Lyall Farms, Alm Hill Gardens also has them — a few varieties, in fact. And don’t get confused by that whole yams versus sweet potatoes debate. What Americans call yams are sweet potatoes. But they are in limited supply, so stock up now.

Many cameras filled the Market on October 18th. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Many cameras filled the Market on October 18th. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You may have noticed that there was a bit of a media circus going on at your Ballard Farmers Market on October 18th. That’s because the Market hosted the launch of Puget Sound Fresh’s Eat Local For Thanksgiving campaign. Among the media outlets in attendance, note the presence, above, of cameras from KOMO-TV and Q13. Ain’t it nice to know that eating local for Thanksgiving is actually newsworthy? Then again, we should all be working for the time when doing something so obvious, and obviously delicious, would be so commonplace that it wouldn’t be newsworthy.

The Rat City Roller Girls, and some folks dressed as carrots. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The Rat City Roller Girls, and some folks dressed as carrots. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Take the Pledge! Take the pledge to Eat Local For Thanksgiving! You’ll be asked to commit to having one item of local food on your Thanksgiving table, but we know our loyal Ballard Farmers Market shoppers can do better than that. Heck, you already eat more than one local food at every meal, right? So why not make your pledge to have everything on your Thanksgiving table be local. And we’ll help you with great ideas from a pair of cooking demonstrations, on Nov. 15th and 22nd. (See Cooking Demonstrations on the right for more info.) Whatever you do, you’d better take the pledge, or the Rat City Roller Girls and some people dressed as carrots (above) will come to your house and punish you in unspeakable ways, and as much as I know some of you are thinking that sounds like fun, trust me, it won’t be.

New harvest rutatbagas from Alm Hill. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

New harvest rutatbagas from Alm Hill. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I eat rutabagas every Thanksgiving. I just steam those puppies up and mash ‘em with butter. Oh, yeah. That’s what I’m talking about. Alm Hill just started harvesting these fine rutabagalicious specimens above.

Cinderella pumpkins from G & J Orchards. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cinderella pumpkins from G & J Orchards. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

G & J Orchards has some beautiful squash and pumpkins right now, like these large Cinderella pumpkins that are as good eating as they are looking.

A crown of goat from Quilceda Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

A crown of goat from Quilceda Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Quilceda Farm has got your goat. Just look at this gorgeous crown of goat, waiting for you to roast it and wow your guests. Goat is delicious, and I’m not kidding. (Though I am punning.)

Bok choy (right) and baby bok choy from Red Barn Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bok choy (right) and baby bok choy from Red Barn Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Are you one of those folks who can’t figure out what the difference is between bok choy and baby bok choy? Well, thanks to Red Barn Farm, which grows both, we have a visual aid for you. Above, on the right, is bok choy, and on the left is baby bok choy. The latter is not a younger version of the former, regardless of the names. These two Asian greens are in fact completely different plants, and you can see the difference in this photo. Note how white the rib of the bok choy is? Now, note that the baby bok choy’s rib is green. They taste different, too. Get some of each, and do a little comparison of your own.

Fresh rockfish from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh rockfish from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wilson Fish had fresh Washington rockfish this past week, and with any luck, they’ve have more this week. And Loki Fish hopes to have local Washington keta salmon this week, too.

Tom Lambert, right, and Sheryl Morgenstern, of Itali Lambertini jewerly. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Tim Lambert, right, and Sheryl Morgenstern, of Itali Lambertini jewelry. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

As the holidays approach, remember Ballard Farmers Market has more than just food for your holiday table. We have talented artists with great works that make for great gifts, like Itali Lambertini, above. Goldsmith Tim Lambert makes this magnificent jewelry from recycled gold, so not only will you wow them, you will do it with a clear conscience.

Colorful pepper wreathes from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Colorful pepper wreathes from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And you can festively decorate your house for the holidays with these brilliant pepper wreathes from Alvarez Organic Farms. These spectacular creations are strung carefully by hand every year by the crew at Alvarez to brighten your home.

I know, you are wondering when I am going to get to the pear sorbet. Okay, here goes. Empire Ice Cream is nearing the end of its 2009 Market season, and in the spirit of fall, their featured offering this week is pear sorbet. Stock up now on all their frozen goodness while you can.

You can see a full accounting of what you’ll find today at Ballard Farmers Market by clicking on “What’s Fresh Now!” in the upper right-hand corner, and we’ll see you today at the Market.


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