Posts Tagged ‘chickweed’

Sunday, January 19th: Cooking Oil, Cranberries, Leeks, Chickweed & Refillable Wine Bottles!

January 18, 2014
Camelina oil from Ole World Oils. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Camelina oil from Ole World Oils. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Happy Sunday! This is the first Sunday since December that your Ballard Farmers Market has had to share with the Seahawks, but fortunately, kickoff in the NFC Championship Game does not happen until 3:30 p.m., half an hour after we close. So you’ve got plenty of time to get down here, get your localiciousness on for the coming week, zip home to drop it off, and get back down here again to watch the Game with us and the gang in one of Ballard Ave’s 13,478 watering holes. And for the 13% of you who still don’t care about the Seahawks, we’re here for you, too!

Oh, hey. Ole World Oils returns today with their camelina oil. This cooking and finishing oil is made from cold-pressed camelina seeds (a mustard cousin) that are grown and processed by Ole World Oils on their farm just outside of Ritzville in Eastern Washington. This oil is fresh, delicious, high in beneficial omega-fatty acids, is great drizzled over salads and as a finishing oil, and has a very high 475 degree smoke point, making it perfect for any cooking application. And it is priced to easily replace all of your imported oils, be they from Italy, Canada or California.

Fresh Washington true cod from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh Washington true cod from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wilson Fish may be best known for its fresh, frozen and smoked Washington salmon and its halibut, but this time of year, if you want fresh fish from them, this true cod and ling cod are what you are likely to find. I love pan-frying their true cod. I make a breading of grits, whole grain flour, rice flour, corn starch, salt, pepper, chile powder, garlic granules and some dried oregano, mixing it altogether in a bowl with a fork, to ensure everything is carefully blended. Then, I like to cut the fish into “nugget” sized pieces, which I give a quick dip in egg, then roll in the breading until fully coated. Then, I toss it in a hot BluSkillet iron pan that I’ve put a healthy amount of camelina oil into, and I fry it on each side until crispy. It doesn’t take long, and you can make up the breading in advance and save any leftover breading in the freezer. This breading works great with Hama Hama Oyster Company shucked oysters, too!

Chickweed from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chickweed from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hmm. Maybe a nice side of chickweed salad would be good with that pan-fried true cod. Stoney Plains Organic Farm has chickweed already, just for this purpose. Farms like Stoney Plains grow chickweed over the winter as a nitrogen-fixing crop that helps build nutrients back into their soil naturally. Smart farms like Stoney Plains choose varieties of chickweed at are good for human consumption, so they get an addition crop out of it, and we get an additional winter and early spring green. Make a simple chickweed salad by tossing it with some salt, pepper, some sheep feta from Glendale Shepherd, some sunflower seeds or pine nuts, a little lemon juice or local verjus, if you’ve got some, and some camelina oil.

Frozen organic cranberries from Starvation Alley Farms. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Frozen organic cranberries from Starvation Alley Farms. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Look, kids! Starvation Alley Farms has frozen organic cranberries for you! Woohoo!!! Make pies, jams, sauces, muffins, cookies, whatever you love to do with cranberries. Make a nice dressing with them for that chickweed salad. Cranberries: they’re not just for Thanksgiving anymore!

Refillable bottles (left) from Wilridge Winery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Refillable bottles (left) from Wilridge Winery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Those big bottles on the left above? They are refillable! Seriously. Wilridge Winery, based in Madrona, worked it out with the Liquor Control Board so that they can reuse these magnum-size (1.5 liter) bottles. Why, you ask? Lots of reasons. First off, whether a new bottle is made from virgin or recycled glass, it still requires a lot of energy to make them. Not these. Next, when they reuse bottles, they do not have to buy new bottles for each new bottling, a cost they would normally pass onto you. And because the bottles are larger, you get twice the wine for the price of one bottle, not to mention that it cuts the cost of labor to fill that bottle in half, too! The result is that for $20 plus an $8 bottle deposit, you get an excellent, everyday, local table wine. Wilridge will be sampling their  wines today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Give them a try, and then grab one of these refillables for your Hawks party, or for the party you having not watching the Game.

Wool from Glendale Shepherd. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wool from Glendale Shepherd. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Glendale Shepherd makes great sheep’s milk cheeses. But something else their sheep produce is wool! This wool, in fact. Mind you, the wool usually isn’t this color of green whilst on the sheep, unless the sheep is acting out against its parents.

Leeks from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Leeks from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Mmm. Leekliciousness. Think sauces, soups, sautés, tortes… tarts for that matter. Winter leeks are wonderfully sweet for whatever application you have, and Alm Hill Gardens has these lovely young leeks for you now.

Many butter flavors from Golden Glen Creamery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Many butter flavors from Golden Glen Creamery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

A little butter with them thar leeks sounds pretty good, too. Or for cooking your eggs… which come to think of it, might make for a nice scramble with some leeks, eh? Or buttered toast with one of Golden Glen Creamery’s many sweet or savory flavored butters. Golden Glen’s farmstead butters are made up on their farm in Bow, and if you haven’t tried them, you likely don’t really know what truly fresh butter tastes like. Trust me.

Certified organic beef chuck roasts from Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Certified organic beef chuck roasts from Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

When it is cold, dark and damp this time of year, it is the perfect time to warm up your whole home with a nice roast, don’t you think? Skagit River Ranch has these gorgeous, delicious, grass-fed and finished, certifed organic beef chuck roasts from their farm up in Sedro-Woolley, in the Skagit River Valley. Grab yourself some roots, and get roasting!

Curly leaf kale from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Curly leaf kale from Children’s Garden. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is also serious kale season, and Children’s Garden has lots of this green curly leaf kale right now for you. They’ve also got some nice collard greens now, too, as well as fresh herbs, and, of course, their beautiful flower bouquets, even this time of year.

Organic Pink Lady apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Organic Pink Lady apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

ACMA Mission Orchards still has plenty of their certified-organic apples and pears from their fall harvest for you. Like these Pink Lady apples — sweet, crunchy and satisfying, they will help you keep the doctor away all winter long.

Whole grains, flour and dried legumes from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Whole grains, flour and dried legumes from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nashs’ Organic Produce produces lots of grains and legumes in addition to the produce for which they are both named and loved. Right now, you can get lots of dried beans from them, from fava beans to kidney beans to black beans to field peas, as well as several types of grains, from hulless oats to triticale to rye to wheat. They even have several kinds of flours milled right on the farm and delivered fresh to you at your Ballard Farmers Market!

Sunflower sprouts from Jarvis Family Garlic Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sunflower sprouts from Jarvis Family Garlic Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Finally, let’s get our sunflower sprouts on for winter, eh? Packed with nutrients and flavor, they make a great addition to salads and sandwiches, and a great garnish, too. Jarvis Family Garlic Farm has these fresh sprouts now, as well as wheatgrass, great for juicing.

Go Hawks!

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, February 17th: Goat Milk & Cheese, Daikon Green, Chickweed and Other Signs of Spring!

February 17, 2013
Goat milk feta from Twin Oaks Creamery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Goat milk feta from Twin Oaks Creamery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, I know this is not a photo of goat milk from Twin Oaks Creamery, but they will have some today in quart bottles. It’s just that I haven’t seen it myself yet, so I lack a photo to share with you. Besides. this fresh goat feta is worthy of celebration in and of itself. It is really good — sweet, not too salty, but with that perfect, simple tang and crumble to compliment your salads.

Nash's Red Russian Kale from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nash’s Red Russian Kale from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey kids! It’s Nash’s Red Russian Kale from Nash’s Organic Produce! It is lovely this time of year, all sweetened up from long, cold winter nights. And it is their own kale, foh realz! But the really cool word from those crazy cats at Nash’s is that they’ll have daikon radish greens today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Seriously. Come check ‘em out.

Shiitake mushrooms from Sno-Valley Mushrooms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Shiitake mushrooms from Sno-Valley Mushrooms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You know, we’ve been through what seems like an endless marathon of holidaze, starting way back on Thanks for the Land Day, and continuing through this week — the grand-daddy of all holiday weeks, for its sheer number of them: Chinese New Year, Fat Tuesday, Valentine’s Day, International Asteroid Day (no longer celebrated in the Ural Mountains of Russian, however), and ending tomorrow with Presidents Day, cuz everyone knows that the best presidents were aquarians! But after tomorrow, we get a bit of a break, until St. Paddy’s Day. Finally, we can get some work done, some sleep, and we can find more time to eat these incredible shiitake mushrooms from Sno-Valley Mushrooms in Duvall.

Chickweed from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chickweed from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, I feel like I am laying down a bit of a gauntlet for Terry Meyer from Stoney Plains Organic Farm with this one. Or maybe the challenge is one to you. See, Terry gets up at 4 a.m. every Sunday morning (that’s only an hour after I’ll actually post this week’s epistle), and he actually reads my words of, err, wisdom, or at least he looks at the pretty pictures, to see which of his products I’ve featured, and then he makes sure he brings more of that item. Apparently, I’ve so bamboozled him into believing that you really are paying attention to this stuff that he thinks you are actually going to march directly to his stand before doing anything else and load up on whatever it is that I have featured. And truth be told, that tends to happen more often than not. So, here’s what you absolutely must have this week from Stoney Plains — chickweed. As it is a winter cover crop, it is only available this time of year, and it makes for a lovely simple salad, dressed with a nice olive oil, a little lemon juice, and some of that aforementioned goat feta. See, this is actually a culinary chickweed, not the stuff that grows in your backyard. At a time of year during which fresh greens are scarce, why not give these a try, eh? Besides, you’ll help me keep Terry thinking that these blog posts have great, magical powers!

Brian enjoy a fresh soda from Soda Jerk Sodas, as well as his new paper hat! Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Brian enjoy a fresh soda from Soda Jerk Sodas, as well as his new paper hat! Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Have you met Ballard Farmers Market’s very own jerk? Soda jerk, that is. Cory Clark is the jerk behind Soda Jerk Sodas, and he makes fresh sodas will local flavors right here at your Ballard Farmers Market. Okay, just so you don’t think I’m jerking you around, this guy in the photo is a not Cory. He’s Brian. And mind you, I don’t know Brian well enough to be able to confidently pass judgement on whether or not he is a jerk, but he certainly does seem to enjoy the fresh sodas he gets from Cory. And he looks quite sharp in his very own, old-fashioned Soda Jerk paper hat, doesn’t he?

Carnival squash from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Carnival squash from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is getting pretty near that end of winter squash season, but Colinwood Farms still has some left for you. Like this yummy carnival winter squash. I love halving these, seeding them, slathering them with olive oil, then laying them face down in a glass baking dish and roasting them until tender at 375 degrees. Their texture is wonderful, their flesh is so sweet, and you can even eat the skin!

Bosc pears from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bosc pears from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pears are beginning to dwindle a bit, too, but we’ve still got some in your Ballard Farmers Market. Like these lovely bosc pears from Collins Family Orchards. They are a great eating pear. Soft and sweet and delicious — great for the kids’ lunch box. Collins also still has some great apples for you, too!

Spinach-gouda puffs from d:floured. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Spinach-gouda puffs from d:floured. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Honestly, I have no idea if d:floured gluten-free bakery will have these spinach-gouda puffs today, though I could swear I saw something puff-like being constructed in the kitchen on Friday when I stopped by. But if you are looking for gluten-free deliciousness, be it sweet or savory, a stop by d:floured at your Ballard Farmers Market is in order. And frankly, even if you are not looking for stuff that is gluten-free, you will still love this stuff. I worked an event Saturday night with a particularly high percentage of people on gluten-free diets, and we arranged to satisfy their sweet tooth with some of d:floured’s brownies. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a plate of brownies disappear so fast, and I grew up in the 70s! (Just sayin’.) Heck, I’m not even sure the gluten-free crowd got any of them! These may not be “special brownies,” but they certainly are special brownies.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, January 20th: Rockridge Ciders Return, Rapini, Dino Kale, Chickweed, Salad Mix & Other Signs Of Brighter Days To Come!

January 19, 2013
Honey Crisp Apple Cider from Rockridge Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Honey Crisp Apple Cider from Rockridge Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wow. Is it just me, or does everyone feel like we’ve been wandering about in a fog all week. I mean, seriously. But hey, we’ll take it, won’t we? Sure beats rain! Anywho, Rockridge Orchards returns this week, after a two-week hiatus, ready for action, and for your thirst. So swing by and get your fix of sweet and hard cidersberry winescider vinegars and seasoned salts. Cuz you may not care who’s playing football today, but you sure miss you some cider!

Rapini from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Rapini from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cold, foggy weather aside, there is hope that we are steadily marching forward toward spring. The days are getting longing — really, they are, even if the sunsets are overrun by fog every evening. And Stoney Plains Organic Farm has the season’s first rapini! Fresh out of their greenhouse, which affords them the luxury of thumbing their noses at Old Man Winter, this cousin of broccoli is a refreshing, energizing promise of spring to come, right now, in January. Enjoy!

Eggs from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Eggs from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This time of year, egg production slows a bit. See, just like us, chickens don’t particularly care for cold air and long, dark nights. There’s a lot of science stuff to explain it all, but suffice it to say that, well, they’d rather be in Cancun right now (where they’d be laying eggs like crazy, I’d imagine). The good news is, Alm Hill Gardens is bringing some of their eggs to Market right now, which is helping take up the slack. That said, if you want farm-fresh, local eggs this time of year, you best get to your Ballard Farmers Market early, as they will sell out earlier in the day than other times of year.

Rainbow chard from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Rainbow chard from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Looking for some tender greens to nourish your body and your soul? Full Circle Farm has lovely rainbow chard. Of course, they also have dino kalespudsbeetssunchokes and much more now, too. Full Circle is located just east of Seattle in Carnation, where they have become one of Western Washington’s most successful farms. Want local? How’s grown in King County sound?

Fresh sausages from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh sausages from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s golden ticket weekend at Sea Breeze Farm. That means that hidden amongst hundreds of packages of their sausages in their meat cases is one package of sausage that contains a golden ticket good for a $100 gift certificate to their restaurant, La Boucherie! Yuppers. And you’ve got eight different delicious, artisan sausages from which to choose: Toulouse, Campagne, Provence, Gremolata, Chorizo, I-Heart-Brandy, Finnochio-Dulce and Breakfast. And they are all amazing, made from the farm’s own meat and other local ingredients. You’ll want to spend all next week eating a different one each night, regardless of the golden ticket!

Dino kale from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Dino kale from Children’s Garden. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Children’s Garden is another King County farm that has worked hard to extend its season in order to bring local deliciousness to you at your Ballard Farmers Market all winter long. Employing the use of row covers to help keep up temperatures for their greens, they are able to bring to you lovely, luscious leafiness like this dino kale right through the cold, dark months.

Herbal teas from Harbor Herbalist Teas. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Herbal teas from Harbor Herbalist Teas. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Harbor Herbalist Teas makes wonderful herbal teas from local and regional ingredients, mostly grown on the West Coast. They offer a tremendous selection of soothing, comforting, healing, warming teas, with a flavor to please every palate. Come by and introduce yourself to your local tea maker, and take some home to help you shake off the foggy gloom this evening!

Chickweed, a.k.a., Satin Flower, from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chickweed, a.k.a., Satin Flower, from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chickweed. It’s not just for your pet cockatiel anymore! In fact, it is a tasty, nutritious winter green that makes for a great salad or a nice garnish. Now, this ain’t your backyard’s chickweed. Chickweed has many, many varieties. This one is bred for eating and for helping farms fix nitrogen into their soil during crop rotation. And those smart kids out at Nash’s Organic Produce in Dungeness figured out it was the right over-winter crop to grow, as it serves that dual purpose. It’s about crop rotation, and it’s about economics for them, and for us, it’s about lunch!

Spicy salad mix from Colinwood Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Spicy salad mix from Colinwood Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Last, but certainly not least today, is this gorgeous salad mix from Colinwood Farms. If you think you either need to forego salads during the winter in order to maintain a local diet, or you have to quit the local diet in order to get your salad on, you would be in err. Colinwood has their greenhouses in Port Townsend working hard, all winter long, cranking out delicious salad mix to keep us happy, healthy and sane!

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, February 27th: Bluebird Grain, Suh-weet Sweet Potatoes, Moby Bread, Righteous Salad Mix & Some Tasty Chickweed!

February 27, 2011

Whole emmer/farro from Bluebird Grain Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’ll be fairly short and sweet this week, folks, as honestly, I am a bit wiped from prepping for the 2011 Farmer-Fisher-Chef Connection tomorrow. (If you are a chef, you need to check this event out, BTW!) Bluebird Grain Farms makes its monthly visit to your Ballard Farmers Market today with whole grain emmer/farro, cereals, flours, mixes and all things graintastic.

Sweet potatoes from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Lyall Farms still has plenty of sweet potatoes, but they won’t last forever, and you won’t find local sweet potatoes anywhere else in Seattle. Stock up on this super food, and sweeten up your dinner tonight. Tell Lizzie I sent you!

Colinwood Farms' salad mix is big and bold with spicy mustards and bitter mizunas. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Oh, happy day! Colinwood Farms from Port Townsend is finally turning out their incredible salad mix from their greenhouses. (And hopefully, the recent cold weather didn’t set it back too much.) This is one of my favorite salad mixes anytime, what with all the beautiful, tender mustards, arugulas and other leafy deliciousness. But right now, it is just about the only salad mix! Amen it’s here!

Gala apples from Tiny's. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Lotsa lovely apples still to be had at Tiny’s Organic Produce, like these gala apples, for instance. Keep that doctor away with these babies!

Ahoy! It's Moby Bread from Grateful Bread Bakery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ahoy, matey! It’s Moby Bread!! I love the cool looking loaves the bakers at Grateful Bread create each week for us, from this whale to lobsters and crabs to alligators and more. And really, if you must eat whale, wouldn’t you feel better about yourself if that whale was made of bread?

Deli to-go food, Sea Breeze Farm-style! Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Do you ever find yourself marveling at all of the spectabulousness in the refer cases at Sea Breeze Farm, wishing they would just come to your house and cook it for you? Well, George and the gang have met you halfway. Now, they are preparing dishes in their restaurant and bringing them to Ballard Farmers Market, and you can take them home to enjoy later. I enjoyed that Farm-Cured Sauerkraut with Pork Belly & Potatoes (right, above) last week. They used their pork in it, and the rest of the ingredients came from other Market farmers, except the bay leaves. I harvested those puppies for them! (Thanks, Jenny.)

Chickweed from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And I end this week with another sign that this winter cannot last forever — chickweed from Stoney Plains. Hey, not only can you eat this stuff, but it actually tastes good. It kinda has a grassy flavor to it. Try it alongside some albacore from St. Jude. You can thank me later.

There is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check the What’s Fresh Now! listings in the upper right-hand corner of this page for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now. But please note that due to our recent cold weather, some crops may not be available as anticipated.


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