Posts Tagged ‘flour’

Sunday, March 2nd: More Spinach, Salad Mix, Local Cornmeal, Brisket & More!

March 1, 2014
Fresh spinach from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh spinach from Children’s Garden. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Well, it’s snowing in Bellingham again. Good thing we’re not in Bellingham! Cuz we’ve got fresh spinach here at your Ballard Farmers Market. Yup, Children’s Garden has begun to harvest its winter crop of spinach. Spring can’t be far off now! Children’s also has mint and cilantro now, too. Yay!

Organic, pasture-raised beef brisket from Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Organic, pasture-raised beef brisket from Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You know what else is not far off? St. Patrick’s Day, that’s what. And if you want corned beef that is head and shoulders above the vac-packed stuff in the Big Box stores, why not corn it yourself? Skagit River Ranch has lots of beef brisket available right now just for that purpose. But don’t wait another week to get it. You need to get it today! Why? Because properly brined corned beef takes up to 10 days.

Spicy salad mix from Colinwood Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Spicy salad mix from Colinwood Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

In the meantime, let’s get our salad on again, Ballard Farmers Market style. Colinwood Farm’s spicy salad mix is hitting its prime right now, flush with lots of tender, spicy mustards, arugula, hearty greens and more. You’ll never have a dull mouthful, and your body will thank you for it!

Freshly-milled Yellow Dent cornmeal from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Freshly-milled Yellow Dent cornmeal from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I like to pan-fry Hama Hama jar oysters or Wilson Fish true cod in a nice coating of spices and cornmeal. Now, I can get my cornmeal from our buddies at Nash’s Organic Produce! They continue to diversify their farm, adding grains and legumes, and producing pork for restaurants. But just recently, they began to bring dried corncornmeal and even buckwheat to your Ballard Farmers Market. Awesome! Soon, we will only have to go to the Big Box store for lemons and avocados! (Of course, with global warming and such, we’ll be able to source those locally soon, too.)

Certified organic D'Anjou pears from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Certified organic D’Anjou pears from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

ACMA Mission Orchards still has plenty of great, certified organic apples and pears from the fall 2013 harvest. They’ve got about a dozen different varieties still, including these D’Anjou pears. Great for the lunchbox and to keep the doctor away.

Bagels from Grateful Bread Bakery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bagels from Grateful Bread Baking. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bagels from Grateful Bread Baking will help brunch you through this fine, if not dry, Sunday. Fresh from the bakery and nice and chewy, they are the perfect vehicle for…

Fromage blanc from Mt. Townsend Creamery. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fromage blanc from Mt. Townsend Creamery. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

…some fromage blanc from Mt. Townsend Creamery. Or better yet, try some of their truffled fromage. Beats the heck out of that stuff from Philly, and that is coming from a guy who used to live in Philly!

Sweet yellow Spanish onions from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sweet yellow Spanish onions from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Add a nice slice of one of these sweet yellow Spanish onions from Lyall Farms next. It provides a nice crunch and a bit of a bite to contrast the cheese and bagel, and it provides a nice platform for…

Salmon lox from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Salmon lox from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

… some wild salmon lox from Loki Fish. They lox up cohoketa and sockeye. I actually prefer the coho and keta to the sockeye. It’s all great, but I grew up in the East, and they use a milder fish than sockeye there for lox. Loki’s coho lox is the closest thing to it, while still being wild and local! And don’t forget to try out their salmon sliders!

Spicy fermented pickles from Britt's Pickles. Photo courtesy Britt's.

Spicy fermented pickles from Britt’s Pickles. Photo courtesy Britt’s.

You know, a nice, naturally-fermented, spicy, kosher pickle from Britt’s Pickles would go well alongside that bagel we just constructed. (And no, it is not called a “bagel sandwich.” It is a bagel. Just like the French eat fries, and people in Buffalo eat wings… well, wangs, actually.)

Siegerrebe from Lopez Island Vineyards. Photo courtesy Lopez Island Vineyards.

Siegerrebe from Lopez Island Vineyards. Photo courtesy Lopez Island Vineyards.

I don’t know whether a bottle of Siegerrebe from Lopez Island Vineyards goes well with our bagel or not. I suppose, with its nice grapefruit finish, that it does have a kind of brunchy quality to it. Of course, you can decide for yourself , since Lopez is sampling its wines today at your Ballard Farmers Market. And did you know that siegerrebe grapes grow in the Puget Sound appellation? Yup. Lopez Island Vineyards grows them right on the island. They like the cool, damp climate.

Breakfast burrito from Los Chilangos. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Breakfast burrito from Los Chilangos. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Of course, you could just get breakfast right here at your Ballard Farmers Market and eat it while you shop! Stop by Los Chilangos for one of their famous breakfast burritos made with Olsen Farms’ pork and Stokesberry Sustainable Farm’s eggs. Yummers!

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, January 19th: Cooking Oil, Cranberries, Leeks, Chickweed & Refillable Wine Bottles!

January 18, 2014
Camelina oil from Ole World Oils. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Camelina oil from Ole World Oils. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Happy Sunday! This is the first Sunday since December that your Ballard Farmers Market has had to share with the Seahawks, but fortunately, kickoff in the NFC Championship Game does not happen until 3:30 p.m., half an hour after we close. So you’ve got plenty of time to get down here, get your localiciousness on for the coming week, zip home to drop it off, and get back down here again to watch the Game with us and the gang in one of Ballard Ave’s 13,478 watering holes. And for the 13% of you who still don’t care about the Seahawks, we’re here for you, too!

Oh, hey. Ole World Oils returns today with their camelina oil. This cooking and finishing oil is made from cold-pressed camelina seeds (a mustard cousin) that are grown and processed by Ole World Oils on their farm just outside of Ritzville in Eastern Washington. This oil is fresh, delicious, high in beneficial omega-fatty acids, is great drizzled over salads and as a finishing oil, and has a very high 475 degree smoke point, making it perfect for any cooking application. And it is priced to easily replace all of your imported oils, be they from Italy, Canada or California.

Fresh Washington true cod from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh Washington true cod from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wilson Fish may be best known for its fresh, frozen and smoked Washington salmon and its halibut, but this time of year, if you want fresh fish from them, this true cod and ling cod are what you are likely to find. I love pan-frying their true cod. I make a breading of grits, whole grain flour, rice flour, corn starch, salt, pepper, chile powder, garlic granules and some dried oregano, mixing it altogether in a bowl with a fork, to ensure everything is carefully blended. Then, I like to cut the fish into “nugget” sized pieces, which I give a quick dip in egg, then roll in the breading until fully coated. Then, I toss it in a hot BluSkillet iron pan that I’ve put a healthy amount of camelina oil into, and I fry it on each side until crispy. It doesn’t take long, and you can make up the breading in advance and save any leftover breading in the freezer. This breading works great with Hama Hama Oyster Company shucked oysters, too!

Chickweed from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chickweed from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hmm. Maybe a nice side of chickweed salad would be good with that pan-fried true cod. Stoney Plains Organic Farm has chickweed already, just for this purpose. Farms like Stoney Plains grow chickweed over the winter as a nitrogen-fixing crop that helps build nutrients back into their soil naturally. Smart farms like Stoney Plains choose varieties of chickweed at are good for human consumption, so they get an addition crop out of it, and we get an additional winter and early spring green. Make a simple chickweed salad by tossing it with some salt, pepper, some sheep feta from Glendale Shepherd, some sunflower seeds or pine nuts, a little lemon juice or local verjus, if you’ve got some, and some camelina oil.

Frozen organic cranberries from Starvation Alley Farms. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Frozen organic cranberries from Starvation Alley Farms. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Look, kids! Starvation Alley Farms has frozen organic cranberries for you! Woohoo!!! Make pies, jams, sauces, muffins, cookies, whatever you love to do with cranberries. Make a nice dressing with them for that chickweed salad. Cranberries: they’re not just for Thanksgiving anymore!

Refillable bottles (left) from Wilridge Winery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Refillable bottles (left) from Wilridge Winery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Those big bottles on the left above? They are refillable! Seriously. Wilridge Winery, based in Madrona, worked it out with the Liquor Control Board so that they can reuse these magnum-size (1.5 liter) bottles. Why, you ask? Lots of reasons. First off, whether a new bottle is made from virgin or recycled glass, it still requires a lot of energy to make them. Not these. Next, when they reuse bottles, they do not have to buy new bottles for each new bottling, a cost they would normally pass onto you. And because the bottles are larger, you get twice the wine for the price of one bottle, not to mention that it cuts the cost of labor to fill that bottle in half, too! The result is that for $20 plus an $8 bottle deposit, you get an excellent, everyday, local table wine. Wilridge will be sampling their  wines today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Give them a try, and then grab one of these refillables for your Hawks party, or for the party you having not watching the Game.

Wool from Glendale Shepherd. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wool from Glendale Shepherd. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Glendale Shepherd makes great sheep’s milk cheeses. But something else their sheep produce is wool! This wool, in fact. Mind you, the wool usually isn’t this color of green whilst on the sheep, unless the sheep is acting out against its parents.

Leeks from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Leeks from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Mmm. Leekliciousness. Think sauces, soups, sautés, tortes… tarts for that matter. Winter leeks are wonderfully sweet for whatever application you have, and Alm Hill Gardens has these lovely young leeks for you now.

Many butter flavors from Golden Glen Creamery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Many butter flavors from Golden Glen Creamery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

A little butter with them thar leeks sounds pretty good, too. Or for cooking your eggs… which come to think of it, might make for a nice scramble with some leeks, eh? Or buttered toast with one of Golden Glen Creamery’s many sweet or savory flavored butters. Golden Glen’s farmstead butters are made up on their farm in Bow, and if you haven’t tried them, you likely don’t really know what truly fresh butter tastes like. Trust me.

Certified organic beef chuck roasts from Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Certified organic beef chuck roasts from Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

When it is cold, dark and damp this time of year, it is the perfect time to warm up your whole home with a nice roast, don’t you think? Skagit River Ranch has these gorgeous, delicious, grass-fed and finished, certifed organic beef chuck roasts from their farm up in Sedro-Woolley, in the Skagit River Valley. Grab yourself some roots, and get roasting!

Curly leaf kale from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Curly leaf kale from Children’s Garden. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is also serious kale season, and Children’s Garden has lots of this green curly leaf kale right now for you. They’ve also got some nice collard greens now, too, as well as fresh herbs, and, of course, their beautiful flower bouquets, even this time of year.

Organic Pink Lady apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Organic Pink Lady apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

ACMA Mission Orchards still has plenty of their certified-organic apples and pears from their fall harvest for you. Like these Pink Lady apples — sweet, crunchy and satisfying, they will help you keep the doctor away all winter long.

Whole grains, flour and dried legumes from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Whole grains, flour and dried legumes from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nashs’ Organic Produce produces lots of grains and legumes in addition to the produce for which they are both named and loved. Right now, you can get lots of dried beans from them, from fava beans to kidney beans to black beans to field peas, as well as several types of grains, from hulless oats to triticale to rye to wheat. They even have several kinds of flours milled right on the farm and delivered fresh to you at your Ballard Farmers Market!

Sunflower sprouts from Jarvis Family Garlic Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sunflower sprouts from Jarvis Family Garlic Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Finally, let’s get our sunflower sprouts on for winter, eh? Packed with nutrients and flavor, they make a great addition to salads and sandwiches, and a great garnish, too. Jarvis Family Garlic Farm has these fresh sprouts now, as well as wheatgrass, great for juicing.

Go Hawks!

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, August 5th: Nothing Says National Farmers Market Week Like Ripe, Juicy Melons!

August 5, 2012

Organic cantaloupe melons from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Happy Sunday, dear citizens of the People’s Republic of Ballard! It’s National Farmers Market Week, it’s the hottest day in two years, and it’s August! Let’s have some fun with silly stuff, gorgeous still, visiting stuff, uncommon stuff and just plain delicious stuff. And let’s get this party started with the perfect summer treat for a hot day like this: melons! Yes, melons have arrived this week in abundance at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check out these lovely organic cantaloupe melons from Alvarez Organic Farms. They’re juicy, sweet, and they’ll even rehydrate you on a hot day! What’s not to love?

BTW, thank you for voting your Ballard Farmers Market “Best Farmers Market” for the umpteenth year in a row in Seattle Weekly’s annual “Best Of…” poll. Oh, hey, and in honor of National Farmers Market, we’d like to ask you to take a moment to show your appreciation for your Ballard Farmers Market by voting for us in the 2012 America’s Favorite Farmers Market Contest. Click this. Then click “Ballard Farmers Market.” Answer a couple of questions, and you’re done!

Fava beans from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Whether or not Oxbow Farm actually brings any fava beans to Market today, you just gotta love this sign from last Sunday. And for those of you who don’t know the man behind the farm that is Oxbow, you might not get the full humor of this sign. You see, that man is Luke Woodward, and he grew these favas. Get it now? (Thanks, Siobhan, for that devastatingly charming wit of yours!)

Mountain magic tomatoes from Billy’s Gardens. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These little mountain magic tomatoes from Billy’s Gardens are richly flavored and nice and fleshy, making them an excellent cooking tomato. They will hold up just fine on the grill alongside of what have you. They have skins that don’t burst, and they hold their shape great, so you don’t just end up with a smoky blob of tomato mush. I gave them a test drive for you, and I can attest — these little guys rock. And I do loves me some grilled maters in the summertime.

Chinese spinach from Children’s Garden. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I continue to maintain that Chinese spinach is the most beautiful vegetable on earth. And it is coming into season right now at Children’s Gardens. I only know two farms around here that bring this delicacy of Asian cooking to Market around here. And it is plenty easy to prepare, too. A little garlic and a quick sauté is all it needs, though you are welcome to gussy it up however you see fit!

All blue potatoes from Nature’s Last Stand. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I just love the color of these particular all blue potatoes from Nature’s Last Stand. And first, let us clarify… there are no truly blue fruits or vegetables. Those that are called blue really are just very dark shades of purple. But what I love about these beauties is that they don’t even bother to hide their purpleness. It kinda just jumps right out at you.

Red Vein Sorrel from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

More cool looking food alert! Check out this red vein sorrel from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. At first glance, I’d say it is venturing to give Chinese spinach a run for its money, but really, I think it wins more in the coolness category than the straight up stunningly beautiful category. Either way, one thing you can’t say about your Ballard Farmers Market is that the tables of produce throughout it are boring or the same old same old, like at the Big Box stores.

Donut peaches from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Now, here’s a peach that Homer Simpson can really wrap his mouth around! This is the coolest looking stone fruit — the donut peach from Collins Family Orchards. Donut peaches are great in so many ways. They are free-stone peaches, meaning the flesh comes cleanly off of the pit, or stone. The pit is tiny, meaning that pound-for-pound, you are getting more peach for your buck. And for flavor, they simply cannot be beaten. They are sweet, juicy and delicious, and I count them as my favorite peach.  Plus, because of their shape and size, they actually are the least messy peach to eat.

Emmer/farro pasta flour from Bluebird Grain Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This is the flour from which Italians originally made pasta. Bluebird Grain Farms does a fine milling on their emmer farro pasta flour so that it is easier to work with for making pasta. Indeed, when you see emmer pastas at Pasteria Lucchese, they are making it with this flour. It is a whole grain flour with a rich, nutty flavor that makes for amazing pasta. Oh, and Bluebird is making its monthly visit to your Ballard Farmers Market today!

Gypsy peppers from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Look! Pepper season has begun! And these gypsy peppers from Lyall Farms are a staple of my summer grilling diet. They are mild, with only the slightest hint of heat, and they grill beautifully, becoming soft and smoky. On hot days like this, I look to eat everything off of the grill, and keeping some of these fellows around fits that bill perfectly.

Gluten-free loaf bread from Dolce Lou. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

If you must eat a gluten-free diet, you probably have been waiting for a decent gluten-free loaf of bread to cross your path. You know, a loaf of bread that looks and tastes like, um, bread? Chewy. Moist. A loaf that, when you squeeze it, it regains its shape. And a loaf with great flavor! Well, your wait is over. Dolce Lou has succeeded where so many others have failed! Check out their 90% whole grain sandwich bread (left) and their olive loaf! Woohoo! So start enjoying bread again!

Canned albacore tune from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fishing Vessel St. Jude joins us today for their monthly visit to your Ballard Farmers Market, and Joyce tells me that they have a great new batch of honey-smoked albacore — “very delicious,” Joyce says. They also have some great sushi-grade loin cuts, as well as their famous canned albacore in many varieties.

Finally, another reminder to please bring your own bags today, and every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, July 1st: BYOB = Bring Your Own Bag! Celebrate Independence In Seattle From Plastic Handle Bags!!!

July 1, 2012

Canvas holiday Ballard Farmers Market shopping bags at Venue and the Market info desk. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Happy Canada Day, eh? And to celebrate the myth of Canadian independence from Great Britain, Seattle is instituting its new ban on single-use plastic bags today. That means those pesky plastic handle bags, often called “t-shirt bags” (though most folks think they look more like a tank top, frankly), are no longer legal in Seattle. So please bring your own bag with you today to your Ballard Farmers Market. Yes, you may continue to see some of those plastic bags around for a little while longer as folks use up their inventories, but don’t count on them. And hey, while you are at it, please practice at the Market what you do at home – separate your waste. That’s right. Your Ballard Farmers Market now has three kinds of waste receptacles: blue for recyclable, green for compostable, and brown for “heading to a landfill in Oregon.” Please pay attention to what you are throwing into which container, because when you are lazy and put stuff in the wrong container, it can cause the whole lot to be landfilled instead of recycled or composted, and that costs extra money and is bad for the environment. Your thoughtful cooperation is greatly appreciated. And if you don’t know what goes where, please ask for assistance.

An explosion of carrots from Gaia’s Natural Goods. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

In honor of Independence Day, coming up this Wednesday, we give you this explosion of baby carrots from Gaia’s Natural Goods. It really does kinda look like a big firework bursting high above Lake Union, doesn’t it? You know, with the 4th just a few days away, today is a great day to stock up on local deliciousness for you holiday, whether you plan to stay home, grill and watch fireworks, go sailing or go camping. Farmers market produce is so fresh, it’ll hold up at least a week longer than stuff from the Big Box stores.

Early bing cherries from Martin Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Martin Family Orchards has the first of their fresh early bing cherries today from their orchards in Orondo, north of Wenatchee. One of the most northern of our cherry farms, they tend to come in latest in the season, but when they do, they come in strong! And they may even have a last few of their lovely d’anjou pears from last fall, too!

Jerry Stokesberry of Stokesberry Sustainable Farm holding one of their fresh chickens. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Meet Jerry Stokesberry of Stokesberry Sustainable Farm in Olympia. Jerry raises soem of the most delicious chickens and ducks you will find anywhere, and they’ve actually got them fresh in their little black fridge for you right at the Market. I’m thinking one of these birds would be great on the barbecue with a can of beer up its bum on the 4th, don’t you?

Alice holding huge heads of Jericho romaine lettuce from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey kids, it’s two faces in a row! How often does that happen on this blog? Today, the lovely Alice is modeling some of Oxbow Farm’s ginormous heads of Jericho romaine lettuce. These suckers are bigger than Alice’s head! And the big leaves are perfect for lettuce wraps, or chop it up for an awesome caesar salad, and you can even toss it in a little olive oil and grill it. Yummers!

Red, white and blue potatoes from Nature’s Last Stand. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nature’s Last Stand returns today to your Ballard Farmers Market for the 2012 season. Of course, since John’s got us all on pins and needles about just what he’s bringing to Market today, I get to play, “guess what the farmer will have today.” Okay, I know a lot of you are thinking, “isn’t that what you do every week?” Well, sorta, but in this case it is hard to even make an educated guess. That said, I have chosen this photo of red, white and blue potatoes from 2010. Why? Because John has always liked to have red, white and blue potatoes for July 4th. And even if he doesn’t this year, the idea is a good one, don’t you think?

Salad mix from Growing Things Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Is this not some lovely salad mix from Growing Things Farm? I think so! It has taken a while for things to dry out over in the Snoqualmie River Valley at Growing Things, but now Michaele and her posse of interns are starting to crank out some serious veggies for us to enjoy. Of course, they’ve still got plenty of their famous eggs and chickens, too.

Fresh porchetta roast from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hopefully, Sea Breeze Farm will have more of these fresh porchetta roasts for us today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Sure, the ones they have already roasted that they will slice off a chunk of for you are plenty delish, but one of these puppies fresh out of the oven or off of the barbecue is simply to die for. Oh, the herbaceousness. Oh, the pork bellyliciouosness. However, if they were just teasing us with these last week, the good news is, they’ll still have plenty of other tasty hunks of dead animals today, ready for the grilling this coming week!

Paglia e Fieno fettuccine from Pasteria Lucchese. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Paglia e Fieno fettuccine from Pasteria Lucchese is as much fun to eat and it is to pronounce! This best of both worlds pasta just begs for being tossed with summer’s bounty, fresh from the Market. And Sam can’t wait to give you any number of delicious, simple recipe ideas for working with it. Even if you already know what you are going to do with it, ask Sam for ideas, if only to listen to his charming Italian accent and watch him gesture his description of a “tear drop of cream.”

Cauliflower from Summer Run Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Summer Run Farm grows some of the most beautiful, perfect cauliflower you will find anywhere, and the good news is that you will find it here, at your Ballard Farmers Market, fresh out of the field and ready for munching. Roast it. Grill it. Make gorgeous salads with it. Or just dip it in freshly made cocktail sauce, like my mom loves to do!

Purslane from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

What up?! It’s purslane (not to be confused with Lois Lane) from Alm Hill Gardens. This crunchy, tangy green is the stuff of legendary salads and gorgeous garnishes. And it is pretty darned good for you, too! But it isn’t around for very long, so grab some today and enjoy! You can thank me later.

Apriums from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Apriums from Collins Family Orchards are sweet and juicy right now. Apriums are a hybrid between apricots and plums, favoring apricots in appearance and flavor. They are the earliest of the larger stone fruits with a limited season, so enjoy them while you can!

Patty pan summer squash from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Yay! Summer squash is in the house! Yup, Alvarez Organic Farms has kicked summer into high gear with eight different kinds of summer squash already, and even more to come. This patty pan squash is awesome on the grill alongside your favorite hunk of meat or fish, and it is so simple to prepare, though you are perfectly welcome to take a more difficult route, if you so choose. Oh, hey, BTW, it is the first Sunday of the month, and that also means we get our monthly visits from Fishing Vessel St. Jude with local albacore tuna and Bluebird Grain Farms with emmer and emmer floursmixes, etc.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,900 other followers