Posts Tagged ‘kombucha’

Sunday, February 9th: Here Comes Valentine’s Day!

February 8, 2014
Fresh cut tulips from Alm Hill. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh cut tulips from Alm Hill. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Just when our nerves are beginning to settle from Seattle’s epic first Super Bowl victory, it is time to jangle those synapses again over St. Valentine’s Day. Woohoo! Here is your guide to all-things-local-and-delicious from your Ballard Farmers Market that will show that special someone not only how much you care about them, but also how much you care about your community! Cuz anyone can go to a mall jewelry store or grab a bunch of flowers grown in the Southern Hemisphere somewhere at the Big Box Store, but what’s special about that? That’s you saying, “I love you as much as a million other generic people love their generic sweeties, and these earrings will be hanging from the ears of a million other people, too.” But that’s not how we roll here in the People’s Republic of Ballard. We love unique, local, direct. We love things having a story and a face behind them. We… we love! And that’s why we will start off by handing the ones we love a bunch of freshly-cut tulips from Alm Hill Gardens. Will they last until Friday? Yes! See, their buds are still tight enough that by Friday, they will be bursting with all their glory… just in time!

Wines from Eaglemount Wine & Cider. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wines from Eaglemount Wine & Cider. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Arriving with a gorgeous bottle of red wine from Eaglemount Wine & Cider will be an excellent career move, too. And to make sure you pick the right bottle for you and yours, stop by Eaglemount today and taste a few varieties of their wines and hard ciders. Then, grab a bottle or two of your favorites, and you’ll be all ready to pop that cork come Friday!

Chocolates from Trevani Truffles. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chocolates from Trevani Truffles. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Don’t show up without chocolate! Trevani Truffles makes beautiful and delicious chocolate truffles flavored with lots of local ingredients. And admit it. You just jammed your finger as you tried to reach for one of them on your screen, didn’t you?

Seastack cheese from Mt. Townsend Creamery. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Seastack cheese from Mt. Townsend Creamery. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey, if you must cut the cheese on Valentine’s Day, make it local, artisan cheese from Mt. Townsend Creamery. This award-winning Seastack is nothing short of legendary — here and around the world. So let your love flow… with cheese!

Oysters on the half-shell, on the beach at Hama Hama Oyster Company. Photo courtesy Hama Hama Oyster Company.

Oysters on the half-shell, on the beach at Hama Hama Oyster Company. Photo courtesy Hama Hama Oyster Company.

And if you want to dial it up a notch, you can’t really go wrong with some fresh oysters from Hama Hama Oyster Company. Not only will they help get you in the mood, their zinc will also help you fend off that cold your sweetie has! Besides, is it really a successful Valentine’s Day without a little bit of shucking and slurping?

Non-toxic, natural candles from Cherepashka Candles. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Non-toxic, natural candles from Cherepashka Candles. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Help set the mood this Valentine’s Day without actually taking any years off of the life of you and yours. These non-toxic, natural candles from Cherepashka Candles come scented by a variety of natural essential oils sure the lay the foundation for a pleasurable evening… if you’ll pardon the expression.

Polish garlic from Jarvis Family Garlic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Polish garlic from Jarvis Family Garlic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Good for heart and the soul, a bouquet of these stinking roses from Jarvis Family Garlic Farm will truly test, if not show, your love. After all, when you’ve loaded up on the garlic during dinner, and that cutie next to you wants to kiss you anyway, you know they’re a keeper!

Fresh sausages from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh sausages from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nothing says love like a nice, fresh, plump sausage from direct from a local farm, and Sea Breeze Farm has lots of sausages so fresh and plump that they will keep until Friday’s romantic meal.

Loki Keta Ikura. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Loki Keta Ikura. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Whether you see them as a salty explosion of deliciousness, an expression of fertility, an indulgence, or simply beautiful, ikura (keta roe) from Loki Fish will be a wonderful addition to your special meal. Place a little dollop of ikura on a wedge of Seastack, place it in the mouth of your sweetie, hand them a glass of that red wine, and settle in for a night so memorable that you will have to start thinking the next day about ways to top it next year!

Heat-shaped Kombucha Mothers from CommuniTea Kombucha. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Heart-shaped Kombucha Mothers from CommuniTea Kombucha. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

For the gift of love that keeps on giving, how about one of these heart-shaped kombucha mothers from Communi-Tea Kombucha? With it, you can have fun making your own kombucha at home!

Herbal teas from Harbor Herbalist. Photo copyright 2013 by Ben Chandler.

Herbal teas from Harbor Herbalist. Photo copyright 2013 by Ben Chandler.

A nice cup of herbal tea will warm the heart and the soul. Check out the many blends Harbor Herbalist has to offer — one for just about every mood. And that may come in handy, if your night passes through many different moods.

Sail boat earrings from Itali Lambertini. Photo courtesy Itali Lambertini.

Sail boat earrings from Itali Lambertini. Photo courtesy Itali Lambertini.

And about those aforementioned unique, local earrings… check these beauties out. They are handmade using recycled gold by Itali Lambertini in Port Townsend. Recycled gold tells your love that you care about the entire world, including the salmon up in Bristol Bay and miners in Africa, because you are not creating demand for more virgin gold that is only going to do harm to both.

Chicken (top) and duck eggs from Stokesberry Sustainable Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chicken (top) and duck eggs from Stokesberry Sustainable Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Finally, one last shout out about our Seattle Seahawks. Did you know that they, and the Seattle Sounders, eat these eggs, as well as chickens, from our own Stokesberry Sustainable Farm? It’s true! In fact, apparently, Russell Wilson will only eat their duck eggs. But wait. How about a little bit of 12th Man conspiracy math? You’ve been seeing references to it everywhere this past week, from the safety 12 seconds into the game, to the kick run back for a touchdown 12 seconds into the second half, to the final score of 43 (4 x 3 = 12) to it being Super Bowl 48 (4 + 8 = 12). Let’s add to that that Stokesberry eggs come in packages of 12! (You can’t make this stuff up!) Clearly, the Seahawks were the team of destiny this year.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, December 29th: We Bid Adieu To 2013!

December 28, 2013
Bottle-fermented hard ciders from Finnriver Farm & Cidery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bottle-fermented hard ciders from Finnriver Farm & Cidery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s the end of the year as we know it, and I feel fine! (Um, sorry, REM.) Yes, we’ve hit the bottom of the last page of our 2013 calendars, and now it is time for the one and only day of the year upon which the entire planet takes pause and celebrates. Kind of amazing, really, that the one thing that unites us globally is getting new calendars each year. All over the earth, we will be drinking and dancing and singing and kissing strangers and blowing up fireworks instead of people for just one day.

And that is why I, for one, believe it is time to switch from a 365-day calendar to a one-day calendar. See, if every day was New Year’s Day, and every day was also New Year’s Eve, the world would finally always be at peace. But until we can get world leaders to agree on my new one-day calendar idea, we need to make the most out of our 1-day-in-365 of harmony. So I say, let’s party like its 1999! Hmm. Wait. Bad idea. Let’s just have fun and love one another, no matter one’s nationality, religion, skin color, gender, sexual orientation, political affiliation, or even one’s sports team loyalties. And what better way to kick off the New Year this coming week than with a bottle of the bubbly, as in bottle-fermented Artisan Sparkling Cider from Finnriver Farm & Cidery? This stuff is old-school, and seriously amazing. And it comes complete with its own champagne cork that will go, “pop!”

Dino (lacinato) kale from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Dino (lacinato) kale from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Looking for some greens and roughage in your diet after a month of holiday parties and snacks? Stoney Plains Organic Farm has you covered! They effectively use row covers to keep their greens going all winter long. Some of their tasty dino kale sounds pretty good right about now, doesn’t it?

FreshBucks_LogoToday is the last day to use your Fresh Bucks coupons at your Ballard Farmers Market. If you receive Food Stamps benefits (SNAP/EBT),  when you use them at the Market, we will match them dollar-for-dollar, up to $10, each time you visit the Market through the end of the 2013. Unfortunately, as I pointed out above, today is the last Market of 2013. So use any remaining Fresh Bucks coupons you have today, or score one last set of them, as long as you use them today. Remember, Fresh Bucks are only good for fresh fruits and vegetables from the farmers here at your Ballard Farmers Market.

The sausages of Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The sausages of Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You know, nothing says, “Happy New Year!” like sausage. I am not sure exactly how it says it, but I am quite confident that nothing else says it the same way. And that is why you should get yourself some fresh local sausages today from Sea Breeze Farm.

Samish Bay Cheese makes a variety of delicious farmstead cheeses. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Samish Bay Cheese makes a variety of delicious farmstead cheeses. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Say cheese! Actually, I’m not sure saying “cheese” is really all that important when you are taking a selfie on New Year’s Eve, but I am certain that adding some of this gorgeous and award-winning artisan cheese from Samish Bay Cheese will make your party much, much better.

Cabbage from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cabbage from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Whether you are making some homemade kraut, braising it, slawing it, or playing bocce with it, you have to admit that this is some pretty darned spectabulous looking cabbage from Nash’s Organic Produce. Of course, they also have sweet-as-can-be beets and carrots now, too, recently kissed by freezing weather and all sugared up. And why not give some of their less famous roots a try? From sunchokes to rutabagas to golden turnips, Nash’s is rocking the roots right now. Heck, try them all at once with one of their mixed root bags, and grab a copy of their 21 recipes for them.

Pickled salmon from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pickled salmon from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Mmm. Pickled salmon from Loki Fish. Now, that says, “let’s get this party started!” But get it early, as it sells out fast.

Syrups from Soda Jerk Soda. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Syrups from Soda Jerk Soda. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Make your own non-alcoholic bubbly with these soda syrups from Soda Jerk Sodas. Or use it as a cocktail mixer. And, of course, you can grab a growler or three of their fresh sodas today at your Ballard Farmers Market, too!

Martini Stix and pickled peppers from Purdy Pickle. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Martini Stix and pickled peppers from Purdy Pickle. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These carrot martini stix and pickled peppers will certainly spice up your holiday festivities. Get down to Purdy Pickle today, and get your pickle on! They’ve got a great selection of pickles from which to choose.

Fougasse from Tall Grass Bakery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fougasse from Tall Grass Bakery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And you gotta love olive fougasse from Tall Grass Bakery. Seriously. It is required of you. Mind you, if for some reason, you are one of those rare (and troubled) birds that doesn’t, that just means more for me! I can eat one of these by myself in a single sitting. Happy New Calendars, indeed!

Kimchi, Krauts & more from Firefly Kitchens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Kimchi, Krauts & more from Firefly Kitchens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I seem to have a disproportionate number of fermented products in the year-end countdown, and maybe that is because that last round of glüg and fruitcake feels like it is setting up residency. Now’s a good time for all of us to embrace the fermented, and healing, deliciousness of kimchi and kraut from Ballard’s own Firefly Kitchens. It’s good food that’s good for you, especially after that third plate of holiday cookies.

Fresh kombucha from CommuniTea. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh kombucha from CommuniTea. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And why not finish with one last bit of fermented goodness that will pick you up and cure what ails you. Yes, it is kombucha from Communi-Tea Kombucha. Delish. And hey, it will work great for toasting in the New Year, too. It’s got the fizz. It has a little bit of alcohol, but not too much. And it’ll give you an energy boost to help you make it through the wee hours. (And you thought these posts were never helpful. As if.)

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, April 21st: Happy Earth Day Tomorrow! Let’s See What Lessons We Can Learn From Our Vendors About Respecting Mother Earth!

April 20, 2013
Oysters on the half-shell, on the beach at Hama Hama Oyster Company. Photo courtesy Hama Hama Oyster Company.

Oysters on the half-shell, on the beach at Hama Hama Oyster Company. Photo courtesy Hama Hama Oyster Company.

Happy Earth Day! Most of us have a sense about your Ballard Farmers Market helping us tread a little lighter on our Mother Earth, but today, let’s take a look at many of the ways the Market’s vendors teach us about living more in harmony with our environment. Take oysters from Hama Hama Oyster Company, for instance. Oyster farming in our local waters requires clean water, and as such, this industry actually encourages us to keep Puget Sound cleaner. But did you know that our environmental sins from years ago, and seemingly unrelated to water pollution, are actually threatening our beloved bivalves today? You see, all that carbon we are pumping into the atmosphere from our coal power plants, our cars and our furnaces has to come down somewhere, and a lot of it is being absorbed into our oceans, where is settles to the bottom in an acidic soup. Now, the North Pacific currents are pushing all that acidic water right up into Puget Sound and Hood Canal, where it is beginning to dissolve oyster larvae and other shelled species before they can even get settled in the mud. It is called Ocean Acidification, and we all need to learn about it, change our habits — drive less, get more efficient cars, switch to electric heat pumps, etc. — and we need to Stop The Coal Trains from shipping more coal to China, where it will just make matters worse. If it isn’t good to burn here, we shouldn’t be giving it to them to burn there!

Terry Meyer of Stoney Plains Organic Farm stands alongside garden starts. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Terry Meyer of Stoney Plains Organic Farm stands alongside garden starts. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Plant a garden with local, organic veggie starts from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Sure, we want you to visit us every Sunday all summer long for the best fresh, local produce anywhere, but if you are planning to plant your own garden, get your veggies starts here, too. That way, you’ll know how they were raised, and using what kind of seed. And the more food we can grow right here in Puget Sound, the less we have to import from other parts of the country and world!

Nash's cover crop seed blend returns nutrients to your garden's soil naturally, without the need for harsh chemical fertilzers. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nash’s cover crop seed blend returns nutrients to your garden’s soil naturally, without the need for harsh chemical fertilzers. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Skip the nitrogen chemicals in synthetic fertilizers, and enrich your soil naturally with nitrogen-fixing cover crops. Nash’s Organic Produce offers a nice cover crop seed mix that you can toss about your garden to help draw the nitrogen your veggies will need right out of the air and ground. Then, when you turn it into the soil before your planting, it will breakdown, leaving all those nutrients right there in your garden to feed all your plants!

Pink Beauty radishes from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pink Beauty radishes from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

One Leaf Farm will have these lovely Pink Beauty radishes today, as well as Tom Thumb & Little Gem lettuce, at your Ballard Farmers Market. Did you know that One Leaf is only in its third year of operations? Yup. We are adding farms to King County — they are located in Carnation, for instance — and that means less need to import. During the WTO protests in Seattle back in 1999, visiting farmers from around the world taught me that the best thing we can do to help them in their countries is to buy local food here. That’s because when we buy imported produce, we are supporting a system of corporate agribusiness that takes over local farmland in other countries to grow large amounts of mono-cropped foods for the U.S. market. In the process, they force the local farmers, who are growing culturally relevant and organic foods for their local communities off of their land, resulting in lost crop diversity and food insecurity in regions of the world with very fertile farmland. So, Think Globally. Eat Locally!

Wild morel mushrooms from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wild morel mushrooms from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Eat wild foods! Before European settlers came to Puget Sound, local Indian tribes practiced a form of agriculture that would be almost invisible to us today. They managed the native, wild edible plant and animal species on a grand scale, so that come berry season, mushroom seasons or time for a clam bake, they knew right where to find dinner. In that spirit, folks like Foraged & Found Edibles today try to protect their harvesting grounds, as their livelihoods also depend on them. So enjoy some wild morel mushroomsstinging nettles or fern fiddleheads this week from your Ballard Farmers Market, and get back in touch with your wild side!

Andrew Your Knife Sharpening Guy. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Andrew Your Knife Sharpening Guy. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Keep your knives and tools sharpened and healthy, so they last longer, all while supporting an ancient artisan trade that does not required electricity! Your Knife Sharpening Guy will put a fresh edge on your kitchen knives, garden sheers, shovels and even your reel lawnmowers, all with a zero carbon footprint. There is no need for you to buy new stuff. Your old stuff can be made new again!

Ikura from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ikura from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Support your local fishery! Washington does a very good job managing its commercial fisheries. So you know, when it’s caught in Washington waters, it is done so sustainably. Loki Fish catches Keta salmon, from which comes this Ikura, right here in Puget Sound. And this summer, they will also catch Pink Salmon here, too. Wilson Fish catches King Salmon along the Washington Coast. Your support of these local fishing vessels at your Ballard Farmers Market ensures their ability to keep catching the best fish around, and keep family traditions — and wages — alive, as well!

Wines from Lopez Island Vineyards & Winery. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wines from Lopez Island Vineyards & Winery. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Support Puget Sound Appellation wineries, like Lopez Island Vineyards & Winery. Most folks think all the wine grapes in Washington grow east of the Cascades, but the truth is that there is a robust grape-growing region right here in Puget Sound! Lopez produces three certified-organic estate wines from their island-grown grapes, including Madeleine AngevineSiegerrebe and Wave Crest White. These wines win many awards, and we are lucky to have them right here at your Ballard Farmers Market!

Fresh kombucha from CommuniTea. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh kombucha from CommuniTea. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cleanse your body, rejuvenate your soul, and reuse your bottle! Communi-Tea Kombucha let’s you do all three! This fermented tea beverage will give you a boost of energy, cure what ails you, and when you are ready for your next bottle, they will even take your old bottle back, wash it, and reuse it! Unfamiliar with kombucha? Try one of these handle 250 ml. bottles. This is the finest, freshest kombucha you will find anywhere!

Sunshine rings from Itali Lambertini. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sunshine rings from Itali Lambertini. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Reuse your gold… or someone else’s, at least. That’s what Port Townsend jeweler Itali Lambertini does. Gold mining around the world is very toxic and destructive, and many of us are familiar with the proposed Pebble Mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska, that threatens to destroy the largest wild salmon spawning grounds left on earth — home to more than half of the planet’s remaining wild salmon. And yet, there is plenty of gold already in circulation, mined decades and even centuries ago. So why go to some generic jewelry store in a mall to get a ring made of virgin gold that is the same as a thousand other rings, when you can get a unique ring, made with recycled gold, made by a local artist, right here at your Ballard Farmers Market? I mean, it’s not just the thought that counts. The materials and craftsmanship count, too!

Pea vines from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pea vines from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Oxbow Farm & Education Center is another King County farm, and besides bringing us amazing local veggies, like these pea vines, in season now, they also operate an educational program that teaches children and adults alike all about organic farming and its benefits, right in Duvall! Of course, supporting them also means you are keeping your dollars recirculating in our local economy, thus creating local, living-wage jobs, instead of exporting your dollars to another state or country. Your support of local jobs means that local farmers are able to support you right back, as they, too, support local businesses. You see, a rising tide floats all boats. We all succeed together… or the alternative.

Kale, zucchini & collard chips from House of the Sun. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Kale, zucchini & collard chips from House of the Sun. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Eat lower on the food chain! House of the Sun produces delicious, nutritious raw and vegan foods, like these awesome kale chips! They get their ingredients from Market farmers. They have a smaller carbon footprint, because they aren’t heating things to cook them. Not cooking foods preserves many nutrients that can be destroyed by cooking them. And you can get your savory and sweet snack on without having to go to the Big Box store to buys some over-packaged “food” made who knows where with who knows what!

Golden Harvest Bee Ranch. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Golden Harvest Bee Ranch. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Eat local honey! Local honey, like from our own Golden Harvest Bee Ranch, supports to protection of local bees, which do a lot of the heavy lifting around here, pollinating most of the crops we know and love here at your Ballard Farmers Market. But did you know that the bees themselves are in trouble? And if they are in trouble, we are in trouble. There’s a thing called Colony Collapse Disorder that has devastated honey bee populations far and wide. So remember, while supporting your local bee can help you will allergies and sweeten your tea, you should also learn more about CCD and what you can do to stop it.

Pumpkin bread from d:floured gluten-free bakery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pumpkin bread from d:floured gluten-free bakery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Eat gluten-free! More and more Americans are finding they have gluten sensitivity. But that is no longer a life-sentence of really crappy baked goods. Not at your Ballard Farmers Market, at least. That’s because we have d:floured gluten-free bakery, makers of all manner of sweet and savory gluten-free deliciousness that does not skimp on flavor in its pursuit of gluten-free goodies. Take this pumpkin bread, for instance. I beseech thee to find another pumpkin bread around that is better than this! Quite simply, whether or not you are avoiding gluten, you will love everything on d:floured’s tables.

Julianna from Ascents Candles. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Julianna from Ascents Candles. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Detox your home! Ascents Candles makes their candles with natural oils, not petroleum products, which means you are not filling your home with toxic fumes when you burn them. Plus, they are scented with various natural essential oils that will help set the mood, whatever mood you are aiming for. And if you’re eating dinner and want no scent at all from your candles, they’ve got them, too. Because after all, Earth Day ultimately starts at home!

One more way to celebrate Earth Day every Sunday is to remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, January 13th: Go Ballard Farmers Market! Go Seahawks!

January 12, 2013
Signed 12th Man flag. Photo courtesy Seattle Seahawks.

Signed 12th Man flag. Photo courtesy Seattle Seahawks.

It’s a cold, sunny January day today, and while many will be glued to the boob tube… the one-eyed god… the idiot box… the nearest television, watching the Seahawks take on Atlanta for another shot at the 49ers and the Super Bowl, your Ballard Farmers Market will be open as it always is, come rain or shine, snow, wind or cold, more reliable than the Post Office, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., just like it is every Sunday, year-round. But we understand that many a faithful Ballard Farmers Marketeer is going to be torn between the two events, or maybe you come from a house divided — between Market camp and Game camp (What, did you think I meant Seattle and Atlanta camps? As if…) — or maybe you are one that wants to figure out how to do both.

Good news! At least a dozen venues within one block of your Ballard Farmers Market, up and down Ballard Ave, will be airing the Game today. You can come down, have breakfast while watching the game, and shop the Market during halftime or after the Game. Or you can drop your Game crew at one of these venues, and you can enjoy the Market, and all the other neighboring shops, in peace! Because here in Ballard, we are all about inclusiveness, and that means accommodating Seahawks and Market fans alike. Venues showing the game include Ballard Smoke Shop Bar, Ballard Station Public House, Bastille, Conor Byrne, Flying Squirrel Pizza at Sunset Tavern, Hattie’s Hat, Kickin’ Boot, Lock & Keel, Matador, Shiku and Zayda Buddy’s. Many are opening early today.

Rutabagas from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Rutabagas from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I loves me some rutabagas from Nash’s Organic Produce. A.k.a., Swedes, or as the Irish call them, turnips. These turnip cousins are much denser and have a deeper flavor, both sweet and earthy. They hold up in stews and soups where turnips turn to mush. They are great steamed and mashed with butter. They are a great addition to your long-braised meats, like brisket or corned beef. They make a nice addition to your root roast. Heck, they are even wonderful as veggie chips, fried or baked.

Taylor's Gold Pears from Booth Canyon Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Taylor’s Gold Pears from Booth Canyon Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Booth Canyon Orchards still has lots of beautiful pears from this past fall’s harvest. They grow some stunning heirloom tree fruit in the beautiful Methow Valley, including these Taylor’s Gold pears, available now. Don’t let the cold air fool you. There is still plenty of great, local, nutritious deliciousness available at your Ballard Farmers Market!

Freshly harvested cultivated mushrooms from Sno-Valley Mushrooms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Freshly harvested cultivated mushrooms from Sno-Valley Mushrooms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Have you checked out our newest farm at your Ballard Farmers Market? Yup. Them’s mushrooms, alright. From Sno-Valley Mushrooms over in Duvall. Over the last year, they shifted from a very small producer to acquiring a state-of-the-art growing facility, and now they are producing these gorgeous shiitakelion’s mane and blue oyster mushrooms fresh for us every week. Mushrooms like a controlled environment for optimum production, and that is exactly what they’ve got at Sno-Valley. Enjoy!

Potatoes from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Potatoes from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Colinwood Farms is another of those farms located in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains on the North Peninsula, a.k.a., the Banana Belt. That makes this their high season, while most farms are on winter hiatus. Sure, they’ve got lots of these lovely potatoes, but don’t let that limit your imagination. They also still have salad mix and braising mixwinter squash and lots of other goodies!

Pepper beet jelly from Gaia's Natural Goods. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pepper beet jelly from Gaia’s Natural Goods. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Do you like your jelly with a kick? Try Gaia’s Natural Goods pepper beet jelly. It is sweetened by their beets, with a nice kick of hot peppers — a perfect accompaniment to cheese and crackers, or as an accent to pork or other meats. They also have a nice variety of berry jams made from this past summer’s berry harvest, as well as their famous pickled beets, and the new addition, pickled carrots!

Fresh kombucha from CommuniTea. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh kombucha from CommuniTea. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Kombucha is made from brewing green tea, and then fermenting it using a “mother” of yeast and bacteria, much like how vinegar is made. It is thought to be healthful, and it is refreshing, with a lovely effervescence. It is also ever-so-slightly alcoholic from the fermenting process, so it is sold like beer, to those 21 and older. CommuniTea Kombucha, born right here in Ballard, makes some of the finest kombucha anywhere, or, if you want to try your own hand at making it, they’ll sell you a “mother” of your own.

The sampler gift box from Tiny's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The sampler gift box from Tiny’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Tiny’s Organic Produce has lots of great apples and pears available from fall’s harvest, including galahoney crisp, pink lady and Mt. Fuji apples and D’Anjou pears, all organically-grown in their orchards in East Wenatchee. But did you know they also make preservesdried fruit and applesauce, too? Yessir. Just down the hill from their farm is the little community of Rock Island, home of Pipitone Farms, and Tiny’s uses Pipitone’s kitchen to process their fruit at the peak of flavor and ripeness at harvest time, so that you can enjoy them on toast, in your lunch bag or with cottage cheese all winter long! You can get a nice sampling of them in one of these gift boxes (above).

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.


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