Posts Tagged ‘rapini’

Sunday, January 20th: Rockridge Ciders Return, Rapini, Dino Kale, Chickweed, Salad Mix & Other Signs Of Brighter Days To Come!

January 19, 2013
Honey Crisp Apple Cider from Rockridge Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Honey Crisp Apple Cider from Rockridge Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wow. Is it just me, or does everyone feel like we’ve been wandering about in a fog all week. I mean, seriously. But hey, we’ll take it, won’t we? Sure beats rain! Anywho, Rockridge Orchards returns this week, after a two-week hiatus, ready for action, and for your thirst. So swing by and get your fix of sweet and hard cidersberry winescider vinegars and seasoned salts. Cuz you may not care who’s playing football today, but you sure miss you some cider!

Rapini from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Rapini from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cold, foggy weather aside, there is hope that we are steadily marching forward toward spring. The days are getting longing — really, they are, even if the sunsets are overrun by fog every evening. And Stoney Plains Organic Farm has the season’s first rapini! Fresh out of their greenhouse, which affords them the luxury of thumbing their noses at Old Man Winter, this cousin of broccoli is a refreshing, energizing promise of spring to come, right now, in January. Enjoy!

Eggs from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Eggs from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This time of year, egg production slows a bit. See, just like us, chickens don’t particularly care for cold air and long, dark nights. There’s a lot of science stuff to explain it all, but suffice it to say that, well, they’d rather be in Cancun right now (where they’d be laying eggs like crazy, I’d imagine). The good news is, Alm Hill Gardens is bringing some of their eggs to Market right now, which is helping take up the slack. That said, if you want farm-fresh, local eggs this time of year, you best get to your Ballard Farmers Market early, as they will sell out earlier in the day than other times of year.

Rainbow chard from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Rainbow chard from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Looking for some tender greens to nourish your body and your soul? Full Circle Farm has lovely rainbow chard. Of course, they also have dino kalespudsbeetssunchokes and much more now, too. Full Circle is located just east of Seattle in Carnation, where they have become one of Western Washington’s most successful farms. Want local? How’s grown in King County sound?

Fresh sausages from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh sausages from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s golden ticket weekend at Sea Breeze Farm. That means that hidden amongst hundreds of packages of their sausages in their meat cases is one package of sausage that contains a golden ticket good for a $100 gift certificate to their restaurant, La Boucherie! Yuppers. And you’ve got eight different delicious, artisan sausages from which to choose: Toulouse, Campagne, Provence, Gremolata, Chorizo, I-Heart-Brandy, Finnochio-Dulce and Breakfast. And they are all amazing, made from the farm’s own meat and other local ingredients. You’ll want to spend all next week eating a different one each night, regardless of the golden ticket!

Dino kale from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Dino kale from Children’s Garden. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Children’s Garden is another King County farm that has worked hard to extend its season in order to bring local deliciousness to you at your Ballard Farmers Market all winter long. Employing the use of row covers to help keep up temperatures for their greens, they are able to bring to you lovely, luscious leafiness like this dino kale right through the cold, dark months.

Herbal teas from Harbor Herbalist Teas. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Herbal teas from Harbor Herbalist Teas. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Harbor Herbalist Teas makes wonderful herbal teas from local and regional ingredients, mostly grown on the West Coast. They offer a tremendous selection of soothing, comforting, healing, warming teas, with a flavor to please every palate. Come by and introduce yourself to your local tea maker, and take some home to help you shake off the foggy gloom this evening!

Chickweed, a.k.a., Satin Flower, from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chickweed, a.k.a., Satin Flower, from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chickweed. It’s not just for your pet cockatiel anymore! In fact, it is a tasty, nutritious winter green that makes for a great salad or a nice garnish. Now, this ain’t your backyard’s chickweed. Chickweed has many, many varieties. This one is bred for eating and for helping farms fix nitrogen into their soil during crop rotation. And those smart kids out at Nash’s Organic Produce in Dungeness figured out it was the right over-winter crop to grow, as it serves that dual purpose. It’s about crop rotation, and it’s about economics for them, and for us, it’s about lunch!

Spicy salad mix from Colinwood Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Spicy salad mix from Colinwood Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Last, but certainly not least today, is this gorgeous salad mix from Colinwood Farms. If you think you either need to forego salads during the winter in order to maintain a local diet, or you have to quit the local diet in order to get your salad on, you would be in err. Colinwood has their greenhouses in Port Townsend working hard, all winter long, cranking out delicious salad mix to keep us happy, healthy and sane!

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, September 12th: Don’t Stop Believin’! New Crops In A New Year!

September 12, 2010

Edamame from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, I admit it. It is really, really late on Saturday night (okay, early Sunday morning, if you must know), and I found myself thinking, “What the heck is going to be my focus this week?” Then it occurred to me that a whole bunch of new crops have suddenly begun to appear at your Ballard Farmers Market, partly in spite of, and partly because of our relentlessly cold and damp “summer” of 2010. Then it occurred to me that we just entered a new year on the Hebrew calendar on Friday — 5771 (can you believe it?!?) — so why not celebrate a new year, albeit the Jewish New Year, and all the new crops that are, finally, coming along with it, after weeks of seemingly the same stuff during a time of year when that should not have been the case. And then that ultimate mega-ballad of late 70s & early 80s (heck, of all time, when you really think about it) by Journey, Don’t Stop Believin’, popped into my head, in keeping with the idea that we shouldn’t give up hope on this year, because lots of local goodness is still in store (and in Market) for us. And since the song just won’t leave my head, I thought by writing about it, I would at least have lots of company today with that song rattling around in our brains. So, feel free to yell, “Don’t stop believin’!” at me in the Market today when you see me, and be sure to spread this musical virus. We’re gonna have all manner of great local food to celebrate in the coming weeks as we finally exit the long summer of our disconten that was the summer that wasn’t. So let’s start with a photo tribute to all the great stuff that’s new at your Ballard Farmers Market this month, like edamame from Stoney Plains.

Thai basil from Nash's. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And Thai basil from Nash’s. Actually, Nash’s has several really cool new Asian crops on their tables. Stop by and check them all out!

Rutabagas from Boistfort Valley. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Boistfort Valley Farm grows amazing rutabagas, and if it’s not gonna be hot this year, we might as well heat up the kitchen while roasting or steaming some of them, right?

Wild blue mountain huckleberries from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

How about these wild blue mountain huckleberries from Foraged & Found Edibles? These have a short season, so enjoy them while you can!

Cranberry beans from Alm Hill. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s taken for friggin’ ever, but finally, we have some honest to goodness shelling beans in the Market! Yup, Alm Hill Gardens has cranberry beans. Woohoo! Now we can get thpthpthperious about thpthpthpuccotash!

Suncrest peaches from Collins. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Suncrest peaches are sweet, juicy, delicious, and as big as your head. Stop by Collins Family Orchards to get some, or just to be mesmerized by them.

Rapini from Full Circle. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Rapini. Isn’t that a spring crop? Ahem. Perhaps you were in Nebraska all summer and didn’t notice that it never got out of spring this summer, save for a week to two. So why not? Thank you, Full Circle Farm, for recognized that when the year gives you lemons that you should make lemonade — or spring crops instead of summer ones, anyway.

Kennebeck potatoes from Oxbow. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The ultimate frying potato, these Kennebeck potatoes from Oxbow are plenty starchy. Need some serious home fries? These are the spuds for you!

Ostergus radishes from Growing Things. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Our endless spring also meant it’s been a great year for radishes. And Growing Things has absolutely been rocking the radishes this year. These Ostergus radishes are a particular favorite of mine, as they are rip-roaring hot. Tired of wimpy-assed radishes. You will love these babies!

Whole chicken and duck breast from Sea Breeze. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sea Breeze raises some tasty chickens, sure, but take a gander (if you’ll pardon the expression) at that duck breast to the right of the chicken, above. Do you see that thick layer of fat under its skin? And that deep, red, beautiful flesh. Oh, my. I had one of those this past week, simply pan seared, and it was marvelous.

Flavor Grenade pluots from Tiny's. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Boom! That’s what I’m talking about. An explosion of flavor from a pluot that is also stunning to look at. It’s the Flavor Grenade pluot from Tiny’s.

Yellow Brandywine tomatoes from Summer Run. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Summer Run is one of the few Westside farms that has had much in the way of beautiful heirloom tomatoes so far this year, and let’s celebrate that fact with this photo of their magnificent yellow brandywine tomatoes. They are huge, juicy and delicious.

Costaluto Genovese tomatoes from Pipitone. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And Pipitone Farms, from Cashmere, has been absolutely raging with the Italian heirloom tomato varieties in the last few weeks. Few places on earth take their tomatoes as seriously as Italy does, and the tomatoes they prize are prized the world over. Like these Costaluto Genovese tomatoes. And you have to admit, they are wicked cool looking, too, aren’t they?

Many melons from Lyall. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Melons have not faired so well in our summer that wasn’t of 2010, but Lyall Farms still has been producing quite a nice selection of them. Above, you can see Tiger, Cantaloupe, Honeydew, Banana Cantaloupe and Water melons. A-friggin-men that someone is rockin’ the melons this year.

Butter from Golden Glen. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Heck, even our creameries have rolled out some new stuff lately, like this Garlic & Sea Salt butter from Golden Glen Creamery. Just add baguette!

Purple Goddess pears from Jerzy Boyz. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And returning for the fall orchard harvest is Jerzy Boyz, with all manner of apples and pears, like these purple goddess pears. At least some crops seem to be on schedule, eh?

And there is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check the What’s Fresh Now! listings in the upper right-hand corner of this page for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now!

Oxbow Farm Is Back!

May 9, 2009

A typical display of bounty from Oxbow Farm -- this scene from 2007. Photo copyright 2007 by Zachary D. Lyons.

A typical display of bounty from Oxbow Farm -- this scene from 2007. Photo copyright 2007 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Surviving snows and floods and cold and a rumored attack of locusts, though no one can confirm it, Oxbow Farm makes it triumphant return to Ballard Farmers Market on Sunday, May 10th after an unusually long winter hiatus.

Oxbow's Luke Woodward restocking the farm's beautiful, and huge, rainbow chard at Ballard Farmers Market in 2008. Photo copyright 2008 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Oxbow's Luke Woodward restocking the farm's beautiful, and huge, rainbow chard at Ballard Farmers Market in 2008. Photo copyright 2008 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Oxbow Farm, located in Carnation, will arrive Sunday with a terrific selection of its magnificent heirloom tomato plants, as well as baby beets (love them greens), green garlic, Japanese turnip rapini, arugula, spinach, Easter Egg and French Breakfast radishes, purple sprouting broccoli, parsley, baby carrots (hopefully, Luke says) and pea tendrils (if there is any justice, Luke exclaims).

Baby chiogga beets from Oxbow in 2008. Photo copyright 2008 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Baby chiogga beets from Oxbow in 2008. Photo copyright 2008 by Zachary D. Lyons.

In case you’ve forgotten what to expect from Oxbow, look above at last year’s baby beets.  These guys give you two dishes in one: roast the beets and sauté the greens… maybe with a little bit of that green garlic. Mmm.


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