Posts Tagged ‘cabbage’

Sunday, August 10th: Happy Farmers Market Week!

August 9, 2014

WhyMarkets_August2013

Happy National Farmers Market Week! Check out this list of all the amazing benefits markets like your Ballard Farmers Market provide to your community. (You can download this image just by clicking on it.) And guess what else? Your Ballard Farmers Market just won Seattle Weekly’s Readers’ Choice Best Farmers Market Award for at least the fifth year in a row! (Honestly, we’ve lost count. And thank you!) Oh, hey, we’ll have great recipe cards for Farmers Market Week from Washington State Farmers Market Association today at the Market Information Desk, too.

Copia (top) and Brandywine tomatoes from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Copia (top) and Brandywine tomatoes from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

One Leaf Farm is rocking the Brandywine and Copia tomatoes right now! The Brandywines (bottom) may not be the most flamboyant of tomatoes, but they are one of the most delicious — the perfect vehicle for salt and mayo, or on a BLT, or in a simple caprese salad. Copias, on the other hand, are quite flamboyant. Just look at all their different colors and stripes and shapes and sizes! Plus, they are awesome to eat, and they will add a ton of character to whatever creation they join!

Pan-roasted padron peppers from Alvarez Organic Farms by Chef Derek Ronspies of Le Petit Cochon. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pan-roasted padron peppers from Alvarez Organic Farms by Chef Derek Ronspies of Le Petit Cochon. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Padron peppers from Alvarez Organic Farms as pan-roasted by Chef Derek Ronspies of Le Petit Cochon last week during his cooking demonstration at our sister Wallingford Farmers Market. Consider this as enticement to visit today, AND as a recipe. Get your skillet nice and hot, with a high-heat oil, toss in the padrons and pan-roast until tender and a bit browned. Finish with a good sea salt. Eat. You’re welcome!

Rubels blueberries from Whitehorse Meadows Organic Blueberry Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Rubels blueberries from Whitehorse Meadows Organic Blueberry Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These are Rubels blueberries from Whitehorse Meadows Farm. They are a domesticated wild huckleberry from the East Coast. The berries are small and full of flavor, and they remind me of the wild blueberries we used to pick while hiking up Cadillac Mountain in Maine’s Acadia National Park. I remember I used to eat my weight in them.

A saffron crocus in full bloom at Phocas Farms. Photo courtesy Phocas Farms.

A saffron crocus in full bloom at Phocas Farms. Photo courtesy Phocas Farms.

Our pal Jimmy, from Phocas Farms, tells us that he’s still got some saffron crocus corms available today for you to plant to grow your own saffron, and that if you get them today, you still have time to get them in the ground so that you can harvest them this fall! Yep, these beauties bloom in the fall. See those gorgeous red threads in the flower above? That’s the saffron. So grab some today, and start your own little saffron plantation! Oh, and he’s got a little bit of last year’s saffron harvest left, too!

Lodi apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Lodi apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Guess what? It is already apple season! The first apples of the year are now arriving at your Ballard Farmers Market. They tend to be tart, green-skinned varieties, like Ginger Gold, Gravenstein, Shamrock, and these organic Lodi apples from ACMA Mission Orchards.

Carrots from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Carrots from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nash’s Organic Produce is going carrot crazy this week! Besides these sweet and crunchy bunch carrots, they’ve got plenty of their five-pound bags of Nash’s Best Carrots, as well as big bags of juicing carrots. So get down with your bad, carrot-loving self today at your Ballard Farmers Market!

Cherry plums from Tiny's Organic. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cherry plums from Tiny’s Organic. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

From the pages of the confused fruit handbook come these cherry plums from Tiny’s Organic Farm. But unlike so many other stone fruits that have been hybridized to create things like apriums, pluots, nectarcots, peachcots and more, cherry plums are actually a true plum, not a cross betwixt cherry and plum. They get their name from their small, cherry-like size and their color. But they have the flavor and texture of a plum. So mix it up this week and try yourself something new… or actually old, in this case.

Baby cabbages from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Baby cabbages from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And under the heading of learning something new every day comes these little, baseball-sized baby cabbages from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. You see, after they harvest the full-sized cabbages in the field, they leave the cabbage plant there, and it grows a second, smaller head of cabbage… this cabbage. Who knew? So, if you need just enough cabbage for one serving of cole slaw, or perhaps you want to braise or grill little, individual servings of cabbage, this is for you!

Rosa-Hale peaches from Martin Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Rosa-Hale peaches from Martin Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Free-stone peaches have arrived. There is a family of peaches, all with the word “Hale” in their names, and these are the big, yellow, sweet and juicy peaches for which Washington is famous. They come freely off of their pits, ergo the term “free-stone,” and that makes them ideal for cooking and canning, as well as just eating fresh. Think of the pies, cobblers, preserves, salads, and more! These particular peaches are Rosa-Hale peaches from Martin Family Orchards.

Soft-ripened Tallulah cheese from Glendale Shepherd. Photo courtesy Glendale Shepherd.

Soft-ripened Tallulah cheese from Glendale Shepherd. Photo courtesy Glendale Shepherd.

If you love stank cheese like I love stank cheese, then this cheese is for you! Meet Tallulah, a soft-ripened sheep’s milk cheese from Glendale Shepherd. This is the kind of character-rich cheese that would make a Frenchman weep. If you prefer to wrestle with your cheese instead of waltzing with it, you gotta get you some Tallulah today at your Ballard Farmers Market! Oh, and this just in: Glendale Shepherd as also begun packaging a five-cheese shredded blend of their sheep cheeses for easy sprinkling on pastas, salads, grilled sandwiches, roasted veggies and more.

Collard greens from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Collard greens from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I loves me some Oxbow Farm collard greens! Sautéed until just tender with some lovely bacon from Olsen Farms, Skagit River Ranch or Sea Breeze Farm, and some heirloom garlic from Jarvis Family Garlic Farm, how can you go wrong? It is delicious and nutrient dense, and it makes a great side for so many proteins, or just build dinner around the collards themselves!

Canned salmon from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Canned salmon from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Do you have guests visiting from out of town who want to bring home a taste of Seattle’s famous salmon with them? Loki Fish makes it easy! Just get some of their canned salmon. It is self-stable, comes in a convenient, sturdy carrying case, and when they get it back to Dubuque, it’ll be better tasting than any other fish they can get there! (It ships well, too.)

Pain au Chocolat from Snohomish Bakery. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pain au Chocolat from Snohomish Bakery. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

There is just something about a chocolate croissant, you know? Flaky, buttery pastry wrapped around deep, dark chocolate… meow! I heart them! And Snohomish Bakery makes some lovely ones that they offer to you right here at your Ballard Farmers Market. Grab one to snack on at the Market, and a few more for tonight’s dessert!

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, March 16th: Of Emperors, Saints, Confectioners, Fishers & Playwrights, Just For The Halibut!

March 15, 2014
Fresh halibut from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh halibut from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Holy Halibut, Batman! The Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife has opened the Washington Coast to a rare March halibut fishery. And Wilson Fish will have this prized local fish today at your Ballard Farmers Market, while it lasts! Normally, we don’t see fresh, local halibut until May. When asked why Fish & Wildlife opened this historically early halibut fishery, a spokesperson said, “Just for the halibut.” (And no, I’m not sorry!)

Daffodils from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Daffodils from Children’s Garden. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

As we pass through the Ides of March this weekend, we begin to look forward to spring, which arrives at the end of the week. In this March of record rainfalls, let’s celebrate spring’s approach by bringing a little of this month’s rare but spectacular sunshine indoors in the form of these gorgeous daffodils from Children’s Garden. (And for those playing along with this week’s game of “pin the reference in the post title to its corresponding reference in the body of the post,” Ides of March is a reference to both an emperor and a playwright.)

Savoy cabbage from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Savoy cabbage from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Tomorrow is Saint Patrick’s Day, the day on which the 13% or so of Americans who do not have any Irish blood in them drink green beer, wear silly hats and act in a manor that, frankly, is unbecoming of the Irish people. Woohoo! And did you know that there were no actual snakes in Ireland? See, the snakes that Saint Patrick drove out were actually pagans. But hey, we Irish-Americans only seem to get this one day of the year to celebrate our heritage, so why not break out the corned beef, cabbage, red potatoes and rutabagas and get our soul-warming one pot dinner on?! Personally, my favorite cabbage for said purpose is this lovely Savoy cabbage from Nash’s Organic Produce. Because its leaves are less tightly packed than green cabbage, and it is full of nooks and crannies, it cooks faster and absorbs better all the delicious spices in the corned beef broth. Nummers!

Desiree potatoes from Olsen Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Desiree potatoes from Olsen Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I am a big fan of these Desiree potatoes from Olsen Farms for my corned beef feast. They, too, absorb the flavors of the pot well, and their waxy, yellow flesh mashes nicely with butter. However, if you boil your pot, instead of simmering it, they do have a tendency to break apart. Then again, your corned beef won’t be happy, either! Another great option from Olsen is their Red Lasoda potatoes.

Classic sauerkraut from Firefly Kitchens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Classic sauerkraut from Firefly Kitchens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

For all those corned beef leftovers, it’ll be corned beef sandwich time, and for that, you’ll need plenty of classic sauerkraut from Firefly Kitchens. I love this stuff. It is naturally fermented and the perfect compliment to corned beef.

Fresh, local butter from Golden Glen Creamery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh, local butter from Golden Glen Creamery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

We Irish loves us some butter, the richer the better. And we’ll need plenty of it around for slathering onto our potatoes and our soda bread tomorrow night. Lucky for us, Golden Glen Creamery up in Bow makes great butter from the milk of their Jersey cows. Don’t forget to get a little extra for the Faeries.

An "Irish" marion berry pie from Deborah's Homemade Pies. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

An “Irish” marion berry pie from Deborah’s Homemade Pies. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I’m sure just how “Irish” a marion berry pie is, but hey, it’s got a shamrock on it, right? And since it is from Deborah’s Homemade Pies, you know it will be ridiculously good. So what the heck? Make dinner in one pot, and let Deborah make dessert!

Hard ciders from Eaglemount Wine & Cider. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hard ciders from Eaglemount Wine & Cider. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, okay… alcohol in fact does have historical, if not hysterical, relevance to St. Paddy’s Day festivities. See, the Church let folks dispense with Lenten dietary restrictions on St. Patrick’s Day, and that meant eating and drinking. It is a day of feasting, after all! Why not celebrate with some great, local hard cider from Eaglemount Wine & Cider? Today, they will be sampling many of their cider flavors, so find the one(s) you like!

Truffles from Soulever Chocolates. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Truffles from Soulever Chocolates. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Meet the newest member of the vendor lineup at your Ballard Farmers Market: Soulever Chocolates. Their chocolates are predominantly organic, low glycemic, and dairy, gluten, and soy free, and they use local ingredients where they can. These are well-suited for folks with dietary restrictions (such as paleo, vegan or diabetic). Enjoy!

Beef rib chop from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Beef rib chop from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sea Breeze Farm has some amazing, long dry-aged beef steaks and chops available right now. If you want to indulge yourself with one of the beefiest tasting steaks you’ll ever have, give one of these a try. Their cattle are raised on lush, natural pasture on Vashon Island, and long dry-aging evaporates much of the water weight while deepening the complex flavors. And keep this in mind: dry-aged beef costs more, but you are paying for less water. What you get at the Big Box stores is hardly aged at all and is loaded with water. If you removed the water weight from it, you’d find that you are actually paying a lot more per pound of beef than you realized!

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, February 23rd: Spinach, Cabbage, Daffodils, Fermented Vegetables & Hot Cider! Winter Collides With Spring!

February 22, 2014
Bouquets with fresh daffodils from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bouquets with fresh daffodils from Children’s Garden. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

No, I don’t care what the forecast is for today. Those are daffodils. Local daffodils. From Children’s Garden. They are blooming right now, bringing with them the promise of a spring that is not far off. So let Ma Nature get a little more gloppy lowland snow out of her system today. Matters not to me. I’ll have a bundle of spring on my kitchen table! Will you?

Over-winterd Savoy cabbages from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Over-winterd Savoy cabbages from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Oh, yeah, baby! Gotta love those over-wintered Savoy cabbages from Nash’s Organic Produce. Having survived not one, but two week-long hard freezes, they are sweet and nutrient dense, and what makes them strong makes us strong! How about some nice braised cabbage? Maybe sauté some. And how about doing a test-run of corned beef and cabbage in advance of St. Paddy’s Day? It’s just three weeks off, you know.

Baby spinach from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Baby spinach from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Boom! Yup, that’s baby spinach from Colinwood Farms. They just started harvesting a new crop from their greenhouses last week. Talk about a hint of spring. But wait! There’s more! Yes, they also now have salad mix again. Indeed, Colinwood has become famous for its amazing winter salad mix, which is full of hearty greens and tender, spicy mustards. I live off of this stuff this time of year.

Olsen Farms pork belly bacon (left) and jowl bacon (right). Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Olsen Farms pork belly bacon (left) and jowl bacon (right). Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Beautiful bacon from Olsen Farms. That’s traditional pork belly bacon on the left, and pork jowl bacon on the right. Jowl bacon, you ask? Yes, it’s bacon made using the jowl of the pig, and it is amazing. It has a unique, delicious flavor, and it is well suited to many dishes. Hmm. Maybe I’ll sauté some Olsen bacon with some of that cabbage from Nash’s tonight, and finish it off with…

Britt's Curry Kraut. Photo courtesy Britt's Pickles.

Britt’s Curry Kraut. Photo courtesy Britt’s Pickles.

Curry Kraut from Britt’s Pickles. This naturally-fermented kraut is not only uncommon, it is uncommonly good. And it is even certified Kosher! I know what you’re thinking. If it’s Kosher, why am I going to add it to my cabbage and bacon. Look, just because it’s Kosher does not mean you are required to keep Kosher to eat it, but if your do keep Kosher, it’s nice to know you can get a great local product like this, eh? Britt’s joined us last week with their kimchis, krauts and pickles. Stop by and try some samples today!

Over-wintered carrots from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Over-wintered carrots from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The over-wintered carrots at Alm Hill Gardens are amazing right now. Mind you, after the last big freeze, they are a little funny looking. Some have even needed to be trimmed a bit. But remember, sugar is natures anti-freeze, and when it got really cold two weeks back, these bad boys got really, really sweet. They may not be beautiful, but they taste incredible.

Organic apple donut dippers and hot apple cider from Tiny's Organic Produce.. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Organic apple donut dippers and hot apple cider from Tiny’s Organic Produce.. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Tiny’s Organic Produce is mixing it up a bit lately with their organic appliciousness. They have begun to offer hot apple cider and apple donut dippers at your Ballard Farmers Market. The dippers are battered, deep-fried wedges of their apples — a little winter decadence that will still keep the doctor away. And the hot cider comes traditional and spiced, and it will warm you up on this cold, late-winter’s day. Enjoy!

Fresh, local Rockfish from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh, local Rockfish from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Last, but certainly not least today, I present you with fresh rockfish from Wilson Fish. They are catching rockfish, true cod and ling cod this time of year off the Washington Coast when the weather permits. Gotta love some blackened rockfish, eh? But remember, supplies are limited, and this stuff always sells out fast. The early bird get the, um, err, fish.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, December 29th: We Bid Adieu To 2013!

December 28, 2013
Bottle-fermented hard ciders from Finnriver Farm & Cidery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bottle-fermented hard ciders from Finnriver Farm & Cidery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s the end of the year as we know it, and I feel fine! (Um, sorry, REM.) Yes, we’ve hit the bottom of the last page of our 2013 calendars, and now it is time for the one and only day of the year upon which the entire planet takes pause and celebrates. Kind of amazing, really, that the one thing that unites us globally is getting new calendars each year. All over the earth, we will be drinking and dancing and singing and kissing strangers and blowing up fireworks instead of people for just one day.

And that is why I, for one, believe it is time to switch from a 365-day calendar to a one-day calendar. See, if every day was New Year’s Day, and every day was also New Year’s Eve, the world would finally always be at peace. But until we can get world leaders to agree on my new one-day calendar idea, we need to make the most out of our 1-day-in-365 of harmony. So I say, let’s party like its 1999! Hmm. Wait. Bad idea. Let’s just have fun and love one another, no matter one’s nationality, religion, skin color, gender, sexual orientation, political affiliation, or even one’s sports team loyalties. And what better way to kick off the New Year this coming week than with a bottle of the bubbly, as in bottle-fermented Artisan Sparkling Cider from Finnriver Farm & Cidery? This stuff is old-school, and seriously amazing. And it comes complete with its own champagne cork that will go, “pop!”

Dino (lacinato) kale from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Dino (lacinato) kale from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Looking for some greens and roughage in your diet after a month of holiday parties and snacks? Stoney Plains Organic Farm has you covered! They effectively use row covers to keep their greens going all winter long. Some of their tasty dino kale sounds pretty good right about now, doesn’t it?

FreshBucks_LogoToday is the last day to use your Fresh Bucks coupons at your Ballard Farmers Market. If you receive Food Stamps benefits (SNAP/EBT),  when you use them at the Market, we will match them dollar-for-dollar, up to $10, each time you visit the Market through the end of the 2013. Unfortunately, as I pointed out above, today is the last Market of 2013. So use any remaining Fresh Bucks coupons you have today, or score one last set of them, as long as you use them today. Remember, Fresh Bucks are only good for fresh fruits and vegetables from the farmers here at your Ballard Farmers Market.

The sausages of Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The sausages of Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You know, nothing says, “Happy New Year!” like sausage. I am not sure exactly how it says it, but I am quite confident that nothing else says it the same way. And that is why you should get yourself some fresh local sausages today from Sea Breeze Farm.

Samish Bay Cheese makes a variety of delicious farmstead cheeses. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Samish Bay Cheese makes a variety of delicious farmstead cheeses. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Say cheese! Actually, I’m not sure saying “cheese” is really all that important when you are taking a selfie on New Year’s Eve, but I am certain that adding some of this gorgeous and award-winning artisan cheese from Samish Bay Cheese will make your party much, much better.

Cabbage from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cabbage from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Whether you are making some homemade kraut, braising it, slawing it, or playing bocce with it, you have to admit that this is some pretty darned spectabulous looking cabbage from Nash’s Organic Produce. Of course, they also have sweet-as-can-be beets and carrots now, too, recently kissed by freezing weather and all sugared up. And why not give some of their less famous roots a try? From sunchokes to rutabagas to golden turnips, Nash’s is rocking the roots right now. Heck, try them all at once with one of their mixed root bags, and grab a copy of their 21 recipes for them.

Pickled salmon from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pickled salmon from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Mmm. Pickled salmon from Loki Fish. Now, that says, “let’s get this party started!” But get it early, as it sells out fast.

Syrups from Soda Jerk Soda. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Syrups from Soda Jerk Soda. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Make your own non-alcoholic bubbly with these soda syrups from Soda Jerk Sodas. Or use it as a cocktail mixer. And, of course, you can grab a growler or three of their fresh sodas today at your Ballard Farmers Market, too!

Martini Stix and pickled peppers from Purdy Pickle. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Martini Stix and pickled peppers from Purdy Pickle. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These carrot martini stix and pickled peppers will certainly spice up your holiday festivities. Get down to Purdy Pickle today, and get your pickle on! They’ve got a great selection of pickles from which to choose.

Fougasse from Tall Grass Bakery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fougasse from Tall Grass Bakery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And you gotta love olive fougasse from Tall Grass Bakery. Seriously. It is required of you. Mind you, if for some reason, you are one of those rare (and troubled) birds that doesn’t, that just means more for me! I can eat one of these by myself in a single sitting. Happy New Calendars, indeed!

Kimchi, Krauts & more from Firefly Kitchens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Kimchi, Krauts & more from Firefly Kitchens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I seem to have a disproportionate number of fermented products in the year-end countdown, and maybe that is because that last round of glüg and fruitcake feels like it is setting up residency. Now’s a good time for all of us to embrace the fermented, and healing, deliciousness of kimchi and kraut from Ballard’s own Firefly Kitchens. It’s good food that’s good for you, especially after that third plate of holiday cookies.

Fresh kombucha from CommuniTea. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh kombucha from CommuniTea. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And why not finish with one last bit of fermented goodness that will pick you up and cure what ails you. Yes, it is kombucha from Communi-Tea Kombucha. Delish. And hey, it will work great for toasting in the New Year, too. It’s got the fizz. It has a little bit of alcohol, but not too much. And it’ll give you an energy boost to help you make it through the wee hours. (And you thought these posts were never helpful. As if.)

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.