Posts Tagged ‘chanterelle mushrooms’

Emmer Gnocchi with Chanterelles, Kale & Brown Butter

November 21, 2010

Chef Peter Birk's gnocchi. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

As prepared by Chef Peter Birk of Ray’s Boathouse for his Eat Local for Thanksgiving cooking demonstration at Ballard Farmers Market on November 21, 2010.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

Gnocchi:

Ingredients:

  • 1# rio grande russets, boiled and riced
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoons freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon each white pepper and salt
  • 2 C Bluebird Grain Farms emmer flour

Preparation:

  • By hand, stir together the potatoes, emmer flour, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Stir in the eggs and mix until well blended.
  • The mixture should come away from the sides of the bowl and hold together. You may need to add 1 to 2 extra tablespoons flour so that the dough is not too soft.
  • Bring a large stockpot of salted water to the boil. Roll portions of the dough into long strands about 1 inch wide, and using a bench cutter or knife cut into 1 inch pieces. Drop them into the boiling water.
  • Cook until the gnocchi float to the surface, 1 to 2 minutes. As soon as the gnocchi are cooked, remove them with a slotted spoon.

Sauce:

Ingredients:

  • 1 recipe gnocchi, see above
  • 3 oz butter, unsalted
  • 4 oz chanterelles
  • 1 leek, julienned
  • 1 small bunch kale, torn into smaller leaves

Preparation:

Heat a sauté pan over medium high heat. Add the butter and heat until just golden and a little foamy. Add gnocchi and toss lightly to coat with butter. Add chanterelles, leeks and kale. Combine all ingredients and sauté until all ingredients are slightly softened and butter is beginning to brown. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Sunday, September 19th: Winter Squash, Bags O’ Carrots, Chanterelles, Native Potatoes, Grapes, Parsnips – Basically, Lots Of New Stuff! Woohoo!

September 19, 2010

Kabocha squash from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fall begins (officially) this coming week, though it feels like it’s been fall for weeks now. I keep finding myself thinking it is really warm for December, you know? I mean, since when do we get a Pineapple Express in September? I might get that beach front property on Crown Hill yet! But hey, when life gives you lemons, make lemonade, right? So lets take a break from building our arcs today to embrace all the lovely fall crops arriving now at our beloved Ballard Farmers Market. Heck, the weather is certainly conducive to cooking fall foods, so we might as well celebrate them now, eh? Like these kabocha squash from Alvarez Organic Farms. Alvarez won the winter squash sweepstakes this year, though actually you’ll find some from other farmers around the Market now, too.

Nash's Best Carrots. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

For those who argue that Nash’s Best Carrots are the sweetest carrots on earth, it is time to rejoice. Nash’s has them again, all bagged up in 5-pound bags ready for crunchy and juicing. Grab a bag to keep on hand for the kids’ lunch boxes and afternoon snacks. If they must eat sweets, let them eat these sweet carrots!

Chanterelle mushrooms from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I have been getting wild chanterelle mushrooms from Mike Peroni of Boistfort Valley Farm since 1991. Seriously. And they have always been the most beautiful, clean, delicious chanterelles I’ve ever had, just like everything else Mike seems to produce from his farm.

Ozette potatoes from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ozette potatoes, like these from Oxbow Farm, are, for all practical purposes, Washington’s only native potato. They are one of four potatoes brought to the Pacific Northwest by Spanish traders in the 1790s. The Spanish established a trading post at Neah Bay in 1791, and they brought with them from South America this fingerling potato that eventually took its name from the local tribes. The Spanish barely lasted until 1793. Apparently, they didn’t like the weather. (Must’ve been two years of weather like the last two we’ve had!) So they buggered off back to points south. But they left the Ozette potato behind, and now it is only one of four potatoes in North America to have travelled here directly from South America. You see, believe it or not, all the other potatoes we know and love here in North America came here from South America via Europe. So enjoy these wonderful native potatoes. They are extremely hardy and rain tolerant, and they are one of the most flavorful and versatile spuds you will ever meet.

Grapes from Magana Farms. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Looking for some sweet, local grapes to munch on or juice? Magana Farms has some right now. For a state that produces so many grapes, not too many make it to the Market. They mostly get turned into wine. So enjoy some of the few that escape the wine press… that is, unless you press them yourself.

Chinese spinach from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Last summer was so hot that Children’s Garden’s Chinese spinach didn’t seem to have a chance. But with this summer being cooler and wetter, their Chinese spinach crop is rocking! I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. This is very possibly the most beautiful vegetable on the planet. Grab some from Children’s Garden today, and ask them to give you some cooking tips while you’re at it.

Black beans from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ah, shelling beans. They are here, finally. Just look at these gorgeous black beans from Stoney Plains. They also have cannellini beans, cranberry beans and edamame now, too, plus some late-season shelling peas. Enjoy them while you can. Or, you can shell them and easily freeze them and enjoy them like they’re fresh during the dark, wet months. After shelling them, I just put them into pint freezer bags, and then, to give them extra protection, I put several pint bags into gallon freezer bags. Then I just pull them out as I need them, cook them in well-salted boiling water until just tender, and then eat them as is, or added to or sided with other foods. I particularly like cannellini beans tossed with duck fat and served alongside for of Sea Breeze Farm’s sausages and some roasted Ozettes.

Sweet corn from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Another weird side-effect of our summer that wasn’t is the ridiculously late sweet corn season. Oh, well. So we all have to suffer with corn in September and October. Oh, the humanity! Well, finally, Westside sweet corn is coming into the Market in adundance. Like this sweet corn from Alm Hill. You know, you can also freeze this stuff very easily, too. Cut the corn from the cobs as soon as you can after getting them home, then put the kernels in pint freezer bags. No need to blanch them , or the beans, first.

Parsnips from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And how about some parsnips? Yup, Colinwood Farms, which came oh, so close to beating Alvarez for the first winter squash of the season, has easily beaten everyone else with the first parsnips of the season. So now, with turnips, beets, spuds, rutabagas, carrots and parsnips in the Market, you can have some absolutely outrageous root roasts, eh? Oh, yeah. Bring on fall, baby. (And we’ll take that with a side of cool, dry, sunshine, please.)

There is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check the What’s Fresh Now! listings in the upper right-hand corner of this page for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now!

Wheatberries with Chanterelles, Apples & Winter Greens

November 20, 2009

Wheatberries With Chanterelles Apples & Winter Greens, as prepared by Chef Peter Birk of Ray's Boathouse for his cooking demonstration at Ballard Farmers Market on November 15, 2009. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This recipes was prepared on November 15, 2009 by Chef Peter Birk of Ray’s Boathouse as part of his Ballard Farmers Market cooking demonstration as part of the Eat Local For Thanksgiving campaign. Wheatberries came Nash’s Organic Produce, apples from ACMA Orchards, chanterelles from Foraged & Found Edibles, the small onion from Nature’s Last Stand, and the kale from Anselmo Farm, all Ballard Farmers Market vendors.

Ingredients:

  • 4 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 1 cup wheatberries
  • 4½ cups broth, stock or water
  • 1 cup chanterelles
  • 1 washington apple, cut into slices
  • 2 cups winter greens, torn in pieces
  • Salt and pepper

Preparation:

In a 5- to 6-quart pan over high heat, heat 2 Tbs. olive oil and add the onion, stir often until browned, about 5 minutes. Add wheatberries to pan and stir until grains are dried, about 2 minutes. Deglaze with a splash of white wine if desired.

Add broth and bring to a boil, then reduce heat, cover pan, and simmer (check and stir occasionally to keep it from boiling over) until wheatberries are tender to bite and no longer tastes starchy, about 50 minutes. Drain the wheatberries and either chill them for later finishing or hold warm to finish sooner.

In a sauté pan, heat remaining 2 Tbs. olive oil over medium high heat. Add chanterelles and apples, cook for 1-2 minutes. Add wheatberries and continue to cook. When mixture is heated through, add the greens and then check for seasoning.

Sunday, September 27th: Wild Things, Uncommon Things & Fall Things

September 26, 2009
King Bolete, a.k.a. porcini, mushrooms from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

King Bolete, a.k.a. porcini, mushrooms from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

One of the many wild treats of fall is the King Bolete, or porcini, mushroom, brought to us by the fine folks at Foraged & Found Edibles. They have all kinds of wild-harvested deliciousness now, from chanterelles to lobster mushrooms to wild huckberries to chicken of the woods mushrooms.

Chanterelle mushrooms from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chanterelle mushrooms from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Boistfort Valley Farm also has chanterelle mushrooms now, in addition to an extraordinary selection of produce that includes fresh-cut herbs, gorgeous onions and Ozette potatoes.

Iceberg lettuce from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Iceberg lettuce from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Under the heading of “uncommon things” is this iceberg lettuce from Stoney Plains. Now, maybe you don’t think iceberg lettuce is all that uncommon, but it certainly is uncommon at local farmers markets. If you want the guilty pleasure some fresh, crisp, cool iceberg lettuce that doesn’t come with all those frequent flyer miles or chemicals, give this stuff a try. Oh, and Stoney Plains has fresh garbanzo beans and edamame now, too, but only for a short time.

Pickling, or flowering, dill from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pickling, or flowering, dill from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Given how many people were asking me, “where did you get that?” in recent weeks, I’d say pickling dill comes under the heading of the uncommon at the moment. I have seen it from two farms of late: Children’s Garden (pictured above) and Oxbow.

Everbearing strawberries from Hayton Berry Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Everbearing strawberries from Hayton Berry Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Many folks think that strawberries are only available in the spring, which makes their presence at the Market now uncommon to them. Everbearing strawberries produce fruit right up to the first frost, and these berries from Hayton Berry Farms are delicious. You’ll also find them at Sidhu, and possibly Jessie’s.

Bok choy from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bok choy from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bok choy uncommon, you ask? Yep. While you will find many farms with baby bok choy, very few in the Market have this true bok choy, above, which comes from Nash’s Organic Produce.

Decorative gourds from G&J's Farm in Lynden. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Decorative gourds from G&J's Farm in Lynden. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Gourds are a decorative, non-edible cousin to winter squash with a very hard outer shell that will last for months, especially if you give them a good shellacking. But most of our Market farms focus on its edible cousin, making these lovely gourds from G&J’s Farm uncommon.

Parsnips from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Parsnips from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Parsnips, like these from Full Circle Farm, are a true sign of fall. They are sweet and earthy, and they lend a brilliant flavor contrast to a root roast and pair well with celery root (celeriac) and potatoes in soups and mashes.

Shallots from Pipitone. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Shallots from Pipitone. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Shallots are another great fall crop. They add a special oniony sweetness and pungency to so many dishes. These shallots, from Pipitone, are the kind that grow in clusters, which some argue are the best kind.

Tanner Woods is one of the members of our Ballard Farmers Market staff. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Tanner Woods is one of the members of our Ballard Farmers Market staff. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Let’s finish of this week’s post with something wild and uncommon: Market staff member Tanner Woods. All of the members of your Ballard Farmers Market crew are a bit wild and certainly quite uncommon, though in general, we try not to fall.

For a fuller accounting of what you’ll find this week at your Ballard Farmers Market, click on “What’s Fresh Now!” in the upper right-hand corner, and we’ll see you today at the Market.