Posts Tagged ‘daikon radishes’

Sunday, December 9th: Beautiful Bowls, Sunny Honey, Fresh Rolls, A Real Jerk & More! Happy Chanukah!

December 9, 2012
Honey & beeswax products from Sunny Honey. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Honey & beeswax products from Sunny Honey. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Happy Chanukah, all y’all! Yup, at sundown yesterday, Jews all over Ballard broke out their menorahs for the first night of Chanukah 2012. And hey, look! We’ve turned on the falling snow again here on your Ballard Farmers Market blog for the remainder of the holidaze. Enjoy! For some extra fun, try moving your cursor around on your browser window. You can make the snow change directions like the wind. Now, let’s sweeten up the season with some fresh, local honey from Sunny Honey, from up in Everson. Annie’s bees help pollinate the crops up at Alm Hill Gardens, and then they give us this lovely deliciousness. Sunny Honey has a variety of honey flavors, as well as honeycombbeeswaxcandles and even beeswax lip balm! Plus, they’ve got those irresistible honey sticks for the kids. Stock up for the holiday for yourself, and remember that Sunny Honey products make great stocking stuffers. And if you are traveling by plane for the holidays, they’ve even got little jars that you can carry on the plane with you!

Beautiful, hand-turned wood kitchenware from Vern Tator Woodturner. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Beautiful, hand-turned wood kitchenware from Vern Tator Woodturner. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Talk about stunning, just take a gander at this stuff! Vern Tator Woodturner is, well, a woodturner. In other words, Vern turns wood and works it with his tools to make these spectacular wood salt & pepper millsbowlskitchen utensilsbottle stoppers and more. These are heirloom quality pieces you will be proud to display in your own home, and that anyone on your gift-giving list will remember you always for. In fact, if anyone is shopping for me, I’d love one of those magnificent salad bowls. Just sayin’.

Collard greens from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Collard greens from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It has come to that time of the year that we find ourselves bidding adieu to some of our farmers, particularly those in extremely cold or flood-prone areas of the state. One of those farms about to part for the next few months is Oxbow Farm. This will likely be their last week until spring, so stop by and gather up the last of their fantabulous produce while you can, and wish them a happy and uneventful winter.

Handmade soaps from Karmela Botanica. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Handmade soaps from Karmela Botanica. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

If you are still buying soap at a Big Box store, you are probably torturing your eyes and skin whilst you miss out on some of the beautiful handmade soaps available direct from the producer right here at your Ballard Farmers Market. Soaps like these from Karmela Botanica, for instance. With an interesting variety of natural fragrances, you’re bound to find one to please everyone on your list. And because this soap is made with gentle, natural ingredients, it will leave you clean and refreshed — not with flaky skin and burning eyes. And it bears repeating: soap makes are great stocking stuffer!

Daikon radishes from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Daikon radishes from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Another farm in the flood plains of the Lower Snoqualmie Valley, One Leaf Farm will only be with us for another week or two as well. By now, they’ve been around your Ballard Farmers Market long enough that you have come to count on them for some of the finest quality produce to be found anyone. Take these daikon radishes, for example. Gorgeous, aren’t they? They’ve also still got a few winter luxury pumpkinscelery rootparsnipsdried beans and more. Stop by today and thank them for another great season, and grab one last load of their deliciousness for your home!

Handmade garments from Suzanne de la Torre. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Handmade garments from Suzanne de la Torre. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Looking for something special for someone that is bigger than will fit in a stocking, or just looking for something beautiful, cozy and warm for yourself? How’s about one of these lovely hand-knit garments from Suzanne de la Torre. Suzanne tries her best to come to your Ballard Farmers Market as much as she can, but as you know, we favor our farmers with vendor space. But with more and more farmers now taking their winter breaks from the Market, Suzanne is back for the holidays. And good timing that, eh?

Fresh sodas from Soda Jerk Sodas. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh sodas from Soda Jerk Soda. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I try to be positive about the vendors at your Ballard Farmers Market, but I have to be honest about this guy. He’s a real jerk. Seriously. A real jerk. Yup, this guy makes fresh sodas the old fashioned way, just like George Bailey did in It’s A Wonderful Life as a kid working at that drug store and soda shop. This is Soda Jerk Soda Company (brought to you, perhaps, by the Department of Redundancy Department… but I digress), and this jerk… this soda jerk is making fresh syrups from local, seasonal ingredients, and then he is mixing them, with the jerk of his tap handle, with soda water, to make the best, freshest soda you’ve probably ever tasted! Please welcome this jerk to your Ballard Farmers Market today, and thank him for being a real jerk, while you’re at it.

Fresh rolls from Four Sisters Gourmet Chili Sauces. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh rolls from Four Sisters Gourmet Chili Sauces. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Did you know that Four Sisters Gourmet Chili Sauces has begun making Vietnamese fresh rolls and spring rolls? And like their chili sauces, these rolls feature plenty of local ingredients from your Ballard Farmers Market farmers, and her shrimp fresh rolls use Gulf prawns from Texas, supporting American fishers while not destroying Mangrove habitats. She sells them regularly, while they last, in small packages, but I bet, if you give her enough notice, and a deposit, she’ll make a bunch of them for your holiday party. What is up!?

Yogurt from Samish Bay Cheese. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Yogurt from Samish Bay Cheese. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Are you missing you some local yogurt? Then you should beeline it to Samish Bay Cheese at your Ballard Farmers Market without delay. They’ve got regular and Greek-style yogurt from cows milk, and they just introduced their Whey Tastier berry yogurt drink (above, right). Of course, they’ve got lots of great cheeses for your holiday celebrations, as well as pork and beef, too!

Seasonal gluten-free deliciousness from d:floured. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Seasonal gluten-free deliciousness from d:floured. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I finish off this week’s installment of local deliciousness with seasonal treats from d:floured bakery. These lovely, luscious morsels are, believe it or not, gluten-free! Yuppers. And your palate will not be able to tell the difference, I promise. What you see here are chocolate-pepperment sandwiches resting on top of peppermint brownies alongside of cranberry citrus bars. Boy, howdy! What’s not to love here? Check out their various savory snacks and breads, while you’re at it, and they’ve got a lovely, seasonal pumpkin mini loaf now, too.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, October 14th: Hardy Kiwis, Carving Pumpkins, Holiday Hams, Celery Root, Cheesecake & More!

October 13, 2012

Hardy kiwis from Greenwater Farm. Photo courtesy Greenwater Farm.

The rains have returned, and frankly… yippee! Don’t get me wrong. I, too, enjoyed having a summer that, well, was a summer. But I wouldn’t live here if I didn’t like rain. And after 81 days without it, it is quite refreshing. The air smells cleaner. The dust is washing off of, well, everything. And I can hear each and every blade of grass cheering. Imagine how our beloved farmers are feeling! So, it really is October. Most farms have already felt a nip of frost by now, and your Ballard Farmers Market is awash in fall crops. Today, we celebrate the arrival of a particularly special Northwest fall crop, the hardy kiwi. These tiny jewels of sweet deliciousness are indeed kiwis, but they have evolved so that they thrive in a cool, temperate climate like we have here in Western Washington. Greenwater Farm grows them in Port Townsend, and they’ll only have them available for a few short weeks. If you’ve never tried them, avail yourself of this opportunity!

Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Halloween is fast approaching, and it is high time to get that perfect pumpkin and carve it. Grab one of these lovely Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins today from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Cut the top out. Scoop, wash and roast the seeds, and carve it up with some menacing looking face. Just be sure to let your kids pick out a pumpkin, too!

A holiday ham from Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Have you ordered your holiday turkeys and hams yet? It’s not too early. Heck, it’s already October 14th! Thanksgiving is less than five weeks away. Seriously. It’s early this year — November 22nd. Swing by Skagit River Ranch today and place your order, so you’ll been sure to have a delicious, humanly-raised, local centerpiece for your Thanksgiving feast.

Celery root, a.k.a., celeriac, from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is by no means the most handsome of fall vegetables, but celery root, or celeriac, is an essential ingredient to many fall dishes. From soups to roasts to amazing mashes — think celery root, parsnips and potatoes! — you’ll need it. In fact, many have been asking about it for weeks. Well, One Leaf Farm, which returned to your Ballard Farmers Market just last Sunday, wins this year’s celery root sweepstakes, being the first farm to roll in with it this year. Woohoo!

Farm-fresh honey from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

We’ve been a little short on honey this past year at your Ballard Farmers Market, so we’ve allowed some of our farmers to bring in honey produced on their farms for sale. This honey, from Boistfort Valley Farm, is made by their resident bees that also pollinate all their crops on the farm.

Kale and collard greens from Gaia’s Natural Goods. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Gaia’s Natural Goods returns today to your Ballard Farmers Market will lots of tasty greens, like the above kale and collard greens. See, with a little nip of frost in the air recently, greens have gotten a lot sweeter, making this a great time of year to enjoy them. Plus, cooking them helps warm up your kitchen and takes the nip out of your house.

Bosc pears from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bosc pears from Collins Family Orchards are in their prime right now. Sweet, juicy, and wonderful to eat, they make for a great addition to junior’s lunchbox, a salad, or a snack at the office during your afternoon break. Enjoy this fall treat while you can!

A colorful fall display at Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Just had to share this photo of the display at Nash’s Organic Produce last week. It comes under the heading of “spectacular displays.” Oh, the fall colors of goldenchiogga and Detroit beetsturnipscelery and arugula. Comforting veggies for cool fall days!

Daikon radishes from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And how’s about some daikon radishes from Colinwood Farms? They have a bright, clean, mild flavor, with just the slightest hint of spiciness. Add them to salads like any radish, shred them as a garnish or to use with sashimi, sauté them. These Asian delights are deliciously versatile!

Cheesecake from Pasteria Lucchese. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

While you are ordering your holiday turkeys, roasts and hams, don’t forget about dessert! From sweet breads to pies to one of these amazing cheesecakes from Pasteria Lucchese, check in with your favorite Ballard Farmers Market dessert makers now to learn about what you’ll need to do to ensure you’ll bring the best dessert with you to whatever holiday festivities.

Finally, another reminder to please bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, October 2nd: Fresh Duck, Daikon Radishes, Concord Grapes, Perfect Peaches & Awesome Artisan Jams!

October 2, 2011

Fresh ducks from Stokesberry Sustainable Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s October, kids, and the seasons are changing — climatically and for crops. It is time to enjoy cooking all those fragrant, home-warming, comfort food kinds of meals that just make the arrival of fall so cozy. And for starters, how about roasting yourself a nice fresh duck from Stokesberry Sustainable Farm? Oh, how I loves me some duck, and Stokesberry raises some tasty ones!

Hey, speaking of cooking, did you know that there’s this new cooking class at Ballard High School to help teach teenagers learn how to eat healthy and cook for themselves? Yep. And your Ballard Farmers Market helps the kids out by donated some produce to them every week. You can help, too! Just swing by the Market Information tent at the Vernon Place end of the Market and buy some Market Tokens for the kids. They will use them to pick out great local deliciousness from our Market farmers. Thanks!

Bulk carrots from Summer Run Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These carrots from Summer Run Farm are so picture perfect, well, I just had to, you know, take a picture of them. They are also sweet and crunchy, ready for adding to salads, dipping in hummus, adding to the kids’ lunches, roasting, or just munching straight.

Daikon radishes from Colinwood Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Not many farms around here grow daikon radishes, and when farms do grow them, they tend to have a short harvest. So swing by Colinwood Farm today for this rare delight. Slaw them. Kimchi them. Pickle them. Add them to salads. Enjoy them while you can!

Carrie sporting Concord grape earings for Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Carrie from Alm Hill Gardens has challenged me to take at least one goofy photo of her modeling Alm Hill’s farm-fresh deliciousness every week until she breaks all of our hearts at the end of the month and moves back to Ohio. In this week’s offering, Carrie sports Concord grape earrings, a la Carmen Miranda. (Sorry, Carrie. The only one of the set I took in which the grapes are lit up by the sun just happened to the only one in which your eyes are closed. Doh!)

Cannellini shelling beans from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Let these fresh cannellini beans from Stoney Plains dry in their pods, then shell them, and you can store them in your cabinet for many months. Shell them while they are still a bit green, then freeze them in pint freezer bags, and you can enjoy them like fresh for months. Fresh shelling beans don’t require soaking, don’t need to be blanched before freezing, take just 20 minutes to cook in boiling water, and provide a different flavor profile than the same beans dried. But now’s the time to stock up. Store some both ways!

Jersey blueberries from Sidhu Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These Jersey blueberries from Sidhu Farms may be tiny, but they pack an enormous blueberry flavor. They are one of my favorite blueberries — remind me of the wild ones I picked in Maine as a kid. If you want to enjoy these all winter long, buy a few flats today, then freeze them on a baking sheet one layer deep. Once frozen, you can slide them into a gallon freezer bag and continue the process with the next batch. You’ll end up with about a gallon bag of loose frozen berries for each flat, easy to use in muffins and oatmeal.

Cauliflower from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Oxbow Farm is famous for having some of the most extraordinary produce to be found anywhere, and their cauliflower is no exception. And for my money, this year’s cauliflower crop is one of the best ever. It is so sweet when oven-roasted. I just toss it with some salt and pepper in olive oil and roast at about 425 degrees until fork tender, preferably with a little browning action going on. And for a little extra flavor, add some cumin!

Hales peaches from Billy's Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Billy’s Gardens still has plenty of these juicy, ripe Hales peaches for you to enjoy. Plus, they still have lots of big beefcherry and heirloom tomatoes, too. And if you want to enjoy this local deliciousness all fall and winter long, load up today, and spend the weekend canning these beauties!

Old Bachelor's Jam from Deluxe Foods. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Welcome Ballard’s own Deluxe Foods to your Ballard Farmers Market today. Rebecca makes amazing jams and jellies with great local ingredients direct from our Market farmers. Above, Old Bachelor’s Jam, as Rebecca from Deluxe Foods explained it to me, has it’s origins in old Europe. Apparently, an old bachelor would come back from foraging the countryside for the day and make a batch of jam with the berries he had gathered, pouring it into a jar. To preserve it, he would cover that layer with kirsch, a double-distilled clear brandy made from cherries. Then, the next day, he would do the same with whatever berries he foraged that day, adding one layer atop another, and covering with kirsch, until the jar was full, ready to be enjoyed all winter long. The result, as you can see in the photo above, is a distinctly layered jam full of a myriad of flavorful surprises. In this case, you see blueberry jam on the bottom and raspberry jam on the top, with, of course, that all important kirsch. You hear me talk all the time about heirloom this and heirloom that. I guess you might call this heirloom jam.

Fuji apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fuji apples mean without a doubt that it is fall. And these gorgeous Fuji apples from ACMA Mission Orchards are certain to satisfy the entire household, while simultaneously keeping the doctor away. Stock up on these and many other varieties of apples today, and store them in a cool, dark place, and you can enjoy them for weeks.

Jerry Baxter, the man behind Got Soup? Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

With a smile like that, I keep telling Jerry from Got Soup? he should go into selling used cars. But hey, he makes some friggin’ incredible soups from Market fresh ingredients, so I guess we can keep him around a bit longer. Of course, he’s smiling today because we were able to find him a treasured spot at your Ballard Farmers Market this week. Woohoo!

Spectacular spuds from Nature's Last Stand. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nature’s Last Stand cranks out some mighty fine potatoes. But I’m not quite sure about what John was thinking with this particular selection of spuds. You see, he’s got red ones, white ones and blue ones — very patriotic — and then he takes a left turn and gives us the fingerling potatoes, too. Can’t quite figure the message he’s trying to send us here. Maybe I’m just over-thinking this.

Hey, there is plenty of local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, October 17th: Beautiful Broccoli, Stunning Sunchokes, Tantalizing Turnips, Sexy Squash, Dashing Daikon & Perky Pluots! (And Some Oysters, Too, But How Do I Make Them Seductive?!?)

October 17, 2010

 

Beautiful broccoli from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

 

Broccoli is back at Alm Hill Gardens. And with the crisp, cool, fall nights we’ve been having lately, it is really reaching its peak of flavor. Indeed, this time of year is best for all sorts of crops that benefit from cold nights and sunny days to sweeten them up and deepen their flavors, so enjoy the bounty that is October, especially in a year in which so many crops were so late that many of them are still around, as well.

 

Red sunchokes from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

 

And how about this for a clear sign that we are deep into fall: sunchokes, a.k.a., Jerusalem artichokes are back. Full Circle Farm just started harvesting both white and red sunchokes. This North American native crop is a member of the sunflower family. Roast them. Fry them. Mash them. Gratin them. Enjoy a bit of American culinary history!

 

Japanese wax turnips from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

 

It is always a pleasure to listen to Oxbow Farm’s Luke Woodward wax poetic about his Japanese wax turnips. And who can blame him? They are one of life’s great vegetables. I can eat them like candy. I understand that there are actual recipes in which one can cook them, but I never get around to that. I either eat them on their own, raw, or I slice them into salads like radishes. They are sweet with a hint of spice. And the greens are great in sautés and salads, too.

 

Winter squash from Colinwood Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

 

Winter squash is at its peak now, in all its colorful, sweet glory. Just look at these beauties from Colinwood Farms. With all these wonderful varieties, you’re sure to find one, if not all, to please your palate.

 

Some serious daikon radishes from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

 

Woohoo! Daikon radishes from Nash’s! Get ’em while you can. Slaw them. Kimchi them. Just plain experiment with them. You know you love them when you go out for Japanese food. See what you can do with them at home. And if you have a great recipe for them you’d like to share, please post it to the comment field below and we’ll put it up in the recipe section of the blog.

 

Flavor Rich pluots from Tiny's Organic. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

 

Sweet and juicy, you will love these Flavor Rich pluots from Tiny’s. They are truly the fall pluot, as they are good keepers, and they are a bit more plumy than other pluots. Enjoy!

 

Shucked oysters from Taylor Shellfish make it easy to add fresh, local oysters to any recipe. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

 

Doesn’t a nice plate of pan-fried oysters or some hearty oyster stew sound pretty good right about now? Well, Oyster Bill of Taylor Shellfish makes it easy for you with these jars of shucked oysters. No frustrating shucking and intimidating shucking knives to deal with. Just grab the oysters right out of the jar and drop them into your stew or stuffing, or bread them and lay them into the fry pan. I don’t know about you, but I have just convinced myself to get a jar this week!

There is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check the What’s Fresh Now! listings in the upper right-hand corner of this page for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now!