Posts Tagged ‘gluten-free’

Sunday, November 3rd: We’ve Fallen Back To Standard Time. It’s Time To Vote Like It Matters… Because It Does!

November 2, 2013
Janelle & Jerry Stokesberry of Stokesberry Sustainable Farm support I-522. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Janelle & Jerry Stokesberry of Stokesberry Sustainable Farm support I-522. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Have you voted? If not, please do. Several items on your ballot will directly affect your Ballard Farmers Market, including:

  • I-517, Tim Eyman’s latest that could unleash aggressive, paid signature gatherers to stand between you and the farmer from whom you are trying to lettuce, literally
  • I-522, the GMO-food labeling law against which corporate agribusiness interests like Monsanto and PepsiCo have spent some $20 million to defeat
  • Seattle City Council & Mayoral races that will determine how the City regulates and supports farmers markets for the next four years

Please do not make the assumption that any race is a sure thing. It is an off-year election, and turnout will determine every race. If you and yours vote, your candidates and issues will prevail. If not, theirs will. You can’t win if you don’t show up. On behalf of the many farmers supporting I-522, like Stokesberry Sustainable Farm, thank you!

Pazazz Apples from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pazazz Apples from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These beauties are Pazazz apples from Collins Family Orchards. They are, essentially, the same as Jazz apples, which makes them phenomenal! Collins has all their rock star apples in now, from Honey Crisp to Pink Ladies to Fuji, so there’s no excuse not to have your apple a day to keep the doctor away. (BTW, did you set your clocks back an hour?)

Wines from Lopez Island Vineyards & Winery. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wines from Lopez Island Vineyards & Winery. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Lopez Island Vineyards will be sampling their award-winning, wonderful Puget Sound Appellation wines, as well as their big reds from the Yakima Valley, today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Try it before you buy it!

Fresh, whole, Puget Sound Keta salmon from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh, whole, Puget Sound Keta salmon from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is Puget Sound Keta salmon season at Loki Fish! For the next few weeks, you can get your salmon as local as it can get — Puget Sound. In fact, it they catch much of their Keta salmon right out in the center of the sound, off of Magnolia Bluff. Keta is an under-appreciated fish. It takes well to sauces, rubs and smoking, is priced well, and it is the one and only commercial salmon fishery of significance on Puget Sound. Other species are slowly making a comeback, but the Keta fishery is robust. If you love local salmon, and you want to support family fishers working the waters you see every day, this is the fish for you!

Cauliflower from Growing Things Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cauliflower from Growing Things Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Growing Things Farm is celebrating the return of Standard Time with a rainbow of cauliflower! From white to yellow to green to purple, and those cool ones with the fractalized spires in them, they’ve got everything cauliflower right now!

Wynne Weinreb and Scott Beaton of Jerzy Boyz Farm support I-522. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wynne Weinreb and Scott Beaton of Jerzy Boyz Farm support I-522. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You won’t find any food that came out of a test tube at Jerzy Boyz Farm. Their heirloom apples and pears were bred for flavor, appearance and durability over centuries, and the seeds are readily available for all to enjoy and grow. No patented crops or trademarked names here. No multinational corporate agenda of greed that spends hundreds of millions of dollars to pressure governments and farmers worldwide to accept their products. Just delicious, wholesome fruit from family farmers with dirt under their fingernails. No wonder they support I-522 and GMO-foods labeling. They’ve got nothing to hide.

Carrots from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Carrots from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wow. Just take a gander at these lovely carrots from One Leaf Farm. They are sooo long and slender, and sooo sweet, too. You know you want to munch a couple of them right now, don’t you? Heck, some of you are now wiping a nose print off of your screen because you tried to go in after one. Well, get yourself to your Ballard Farmers Market now, and grab a bunch… or three!

Canned local albacore tuna in a variety of flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Canned local albacore tuna in a variety of flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is the first Sunday of the month, and that means it is local albacore tuna day at your Ballard Farmers Market! See visit Fishing Vessel St. Jude, and stock up on the best canned tuna you will ever taste, low in heavy metals and high in beneficial omega-fatty acids. Or grab some frozen tuna loins, some smoked tuna, or perhaps some jerkied tuna.  Mmm. Tuna.

A beautiful field of Camelina at Old World Oils. Photo courtesy Old World Oils.

A beautiful field of Camelina at Ole World Oils. Photo courtesy Old World Oils.

This is a field of camelina growing at Ole World Oils, just west of Ritzville in Eastern Washington. This member of the mustard family has been used as a cooking oil for centuries. A seed crop, it is a perfect compliment to grain crops, as it helps build nitrogen and other nutrients into soils, thus reducing the need for chemical additives. Camelina has never been genetically modified, like its much younger cousin, canola. And it produces a cooking oil with a very high smoke point — 475 degrees — that is loaded with beneficial omega-3 fatty acids and anti-oxidents. Ole World Oils now offers their cold-pressed, unrefined Camelina Gold cooking oil at your Ballard Farmers Market. So, you can say you know your cooking oil guys now, too!

Kimchi, Krauts & more from Firefly Kitchens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Kimchi, Krauts & more from Firefly Kitchens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Keep your mouth and your tummy happy with naturally-fermented kimchisauerkraut and more from Firefly Kitchens, based right here in Ballard. They make a perfect condiment to many dishes — I am partial to the caraway kraut on a nice bratwurst from Skagit River Ranch or Stokesberry Sustainable Farm — or you can just enjoy them as is. They often offer bottles of brine from their various batches, too, and it makes for a great mixer, or it’s great straight as a tummy tonic. After all, this is living food full of billions of happy, healthful probiotics. Good… and good for you!

Aged goat cheeses from Twin Oaks Creamery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Aged goat cheeses from Twin Oaks Creamery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Well. the goatee girls at Twin Oaks Creamery are drying up for the winter, which means no more goat yogurt for a few months, though they do still have chevre available. They also have some lovely aged goat cheeses, from their feta to their ashed goat cheese to a nice, hard aged goat cheese (center, above). Of course, they also still have cows milkfresh curds and other cows milk cheeses, too.

Brilliant kales and chards from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Brilliant kales and chards from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

How can you not love fall greens? Boistfort Valley Farm produces some of the most beautiful greens around. Just look at those stunning golden chard and red chard bunches above, flanked by red Russian kale on the left and curly leaf kale on the right. And here’s a shopping tip for you. Look at the cuts on those chard stalks. See how there is little to no discoloration? That’s how you know this chard is very fresh.

Sugar Pie pumpkins from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sugar Pie pumpkins from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Perhaps you are venturing to make yourself a nice pumpkin pie, or some pumpkin soup, or even some pumpkin bread. You will find these gorgeous Sugar Pie pumpkins at Oxbow Farm. Remember, not all pumpkins are for eating. You wouldn’t want to eat a carving pumpkin, for instance. But these babies are specifically for eating. These are the pumpkins from which Pasteria Lucchese makes its famous pumpkin cappellacci. Enjoy!

Pumpkin bread from nuflours gluten-free bakery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pumpkin bread from nuflours gluten-free bakery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Speaking of pumpkin bread, this is gluten-free pumpkin bread from nuflours gluten-free bakery. And it is awesome. If you require a gluten-free diet, rejoice! If you don’t, ignore the fact that this is gluten-free and enjoy! You can thank me later.

Happy Birthday, Dad!

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, January 8th: We’re Back & We Missed You, Too! Farewell Christina. Thanks for the Food Love.

January 8, 2012

Chef Christina Kim Choi slinging mushrooms for Foraged & Found Edibles at West Seattle Farmers Market in 2005. Photo copyright 2005 by Zachary D. Lyons.

With sadness, we share the news of the passing of Christina Kim Choi, a talented young chef who spent many days working at Ballard Farmers Market for Foraged & Found Edibles, which she co-founded with Jeremy Faber, as well as as a shopper. She dedicated herself to local, sustainable food. Christina passed away on Wednesday, December 28, 2011 from a brain aneurism at the age of 34. Rest well, Christina.

Washington black truffles from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Jeremy Faber of Foraged & Found Edibles let me know that he will have his first Washington black truffles of the season today at your Ballard Farmers Market. This rare treat is lovely enjoyed simply shaved over some buttered emmer pappardelle from Pasteria Lucchese. Stop by, pickup some truffles, maybe some chanterelles, pay your respects to Jeremy, then go home tonight, cook up some amazing, local deliciousness with your love ones, give them a hug, and raise a glass to Christina. Because if you love Seattle’s locavoric food scene, whether you realize it or not, Christina’s fingerprints are all over it.

Purple goddess pears from Jerzy Boyz. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

We are sooo glad to be back today at your Ballard Farmers Market today. We’ve missed you woe these three long weeks. You know, it is a bit of a crap shoot for me today to tell you what you’ll find on the tables of the farmers at your Ballard Farmers Market in advance of them arriving this morning, since we haven’t seen them since December 18th. So I am shooting from the hip here. Last I recall, Jerzy Boyz assured me that they would have these gorgeous purple goddess pears for a while. Lets hope “a while” includes today. But if not, I am sure they’ll have plenty of other fruit for you to enjoy!

Beautiful cabbages from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And I am fairly certain Nash’s Organic Produce with have more of these loverly cabbages today. Hey, we’ve got a favor to ask of you. Please help us save the Farmers Market Nutrition Programs from the Governor’s budget axe. This federal-state partnership program leverages $900,000 of federal funds into our state with just a $100,000 state investment. It is also a rare government program that works, and that, in the end, actually pays for itself by generating local economic activity. Please call your state legislator tomorrow or Tuesday at (800) 562-6000 with this simple message: “restore funding for the Farmers Market Nutrition Programs.” To learn more about these program, see yesterday’s blog post on the subject.

Award-winning jersey cow yogurt from Silver Springs Creamery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This jersey cow yogurt from Silver Springs Creamery took top honors in its class at the 2010 American Cheese Society Awards. And it’s no wonder. This is some of the most amazing yogurt you will ever taste. It comes with a thick, creamery cap atop it that is as rich tasting as any yogurt you’ve ever encountered. If you’ve been looking for some yogurt with some body, with an attitude, that ain’t no wussy yogurt, this is for you. And best of all, it comes to you directly from your local dairy!

Mustard greens from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The weather’s been pretty mild since we saw you all last, and so I am going out on a limb and predicting that Full Circle Farm will have some of these mustard greens today. See, we haven’t gotten completely frozen out yet, so hopefully these beauties are still hangin’ in there. But if not, you can count on them to have plenty of other good vege today.

Beautiful bacon from the happy pigs of Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Mmm. Bacon. Salty, smoky, fatty porkiliciousness for any season, direct from George and Eiko at Skagit River Ranch. But get there early today, cuz just like their eggs, their bacon always sells out. Mmm. Bacon.

Desiree potatoes from Olsen Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And, of course, Olsen Farms will have all manner of spudtasticness today, with potatoes of every shape, color and size. I am a particular fan of these desiree potatoes. They have a waxy, yellow flesh that is perfect steamed and slathered with lots of good butter. And they stand up well to being thrown in the pot with your corned beef, too.

A sampler pack of canned tuna from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fishing Vessel St. Jude makes their monthly appearance today with the best albacore tuna you will find anywhere, made all the better because it comes to you right from the boat that caught it off the coast of Washington. This tuna is high in beneficial omega-fatty acids and low in mercury, because they catch it young as it is swimming from the cold waters of their birth in the North Pacific on their way to the tropics to get their party on as young hipsters. Get it as frozen loins, ready to sear or eat raw as sashimi, or get it smoked or dried, and it is the best canned tuna you will ever taste. Just don’t drain off the liquid when you open the can. That’s not water. It’s the flavorful natural juices of the fish!

Gluten-free chocolate decadence cake and chocolate muffins from Deborah's Homemade Pies. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Let us finish with dessert. Mind you, I am a charter member of Dessert First! But most folks eat it after their meal. Go figure. Well, Deborah — the Deborah of Deborah’s Homemade Pies — tells me that she just may have some of these incredible, gluten-free chocolate muffins and chocolate decadence cake today. Seriously, this stuff is amazing. The muffins are moist and delicious, and the cake is rich, dense and, as it should be, decadent. You’ve had a week to get over your holiday gorging. It’s time to treat yourself again!

Just a reminder to please help us save the Farmers Market Nutrition Programs from the Governor’s budget axe. This federal-state partnership program leverages $900,000 of federal funds into our state with just a $100,000 state investment. It is also a rare government program that works, and that, in the end, actually pays for itself by generating local economic activity. Please call your state legislator tomorrow or Tuesday at (800) 562-6000 with this simple message: “restore funding for the Farmers Market Nutrition Programs.” To learn more about these program, see yesterday’s blog post on the subject.

Hey, there is plenty of local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, February 7th: Lotsa New Vendors; Lotsa Game Day Munchies!

February 7, 2010

Autumn Martin returns today with her Hot Cakes! Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hots Cakes, by Chef Autumn Martin, is just one of several new or returning vendors you will find at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Autumn may be best known for her tenure as Chocolatier at Theo Chocolate, but she is first and foremost a pastry chef who is a master of cake making. And you can enjoy little tastes of the deliciousness she creates, hot out of your own oven. Just pick up a dozen or so (though I think the official serving size is one) of her little cakes made in heat resistant Mason jars, and pop them in your oven for a warmed-over explosion of lusciousness in your mouth. And if you really need someone else to do all the cooking, you’ll want to check out new vendor Cibo Pronto with their fully prepped, frozen entrées made from local, organic ingredients, ready, too, for you to pop in your oven.

New Southwestern Pork Pie from Deborah's Homemade Pies. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Since I seem to be getting off on a “the game is on, and we don’t want to friggin’ cook, or we’ll miss a commercial” kinda slant here, how about taking home one of Deborah’s Homemade Pies’ sweet or savory pies, eh? The sweet pies are ready to eat, so you can stuff your pie-hole with one of them while you are waiting for the savory pie, like her new Southwestern Pork Pie (above) to bake in the oven. (Seems I am on a bit of a dessert first slant, too, aren’t I? I think the official logo for Dessert First! is a fist held in the air, a la Earth First!, only it is holding a cake fork.)

Colinwood Farms' salad mix is big and bold with spicy mustards and bitter mizunas. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You’ll want a lazy salad, too, and for that, stop by Colinwood Farms for some of their amazing spicy winter salad mix. Colinwood really is returning to the Market this week. I know I promised their return two weeks ago, but their truck blew an engine halfway to Ballard from Port Townsend. They spent last weekend picking up a new truck. So today, finally, they return. They should also have some gorgeous mustard greens and kale, some spuds, and other goodness from the Banana Belt of the northern Olympic Peninsula.

'Zaw offers gluten-free dough for its pizza crust. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

How about taking home a pizza that’s ready for the oven? ‘Zaw Artisan Pizza In The Raw makes take-and-bake pizzas up fresh, right at the Market, from Market-fresh ingredients. And for those of you avoiding pizza because you can’t handle the gluten in the crust, ‘Zaw offers a gluten-free crust just for you! Oh, a couple other returning folks with stuff for your game day festivities: Pacific Coast Bakery, with an expanded line of yummy baked goods… and do you remember the guy who used to sell his amazing salsa at Ballard Farmers Market years ago? He’s back, too!

Trailhead cheese from Mt. Townsend Creamery. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And cheese. You’ll need cheese. Like this incredible Trailhead aged cheese from Mt. Townsend Creamery. This stuff is so buttery and delicious, you’ll need to get two of three wedges, ‘cuz you’re gonna eat it all, fast. Mt. Townsend is another of our growing number of wonderful vendors from Port Townsend. Of course, you’ll also find great cheese from Estrella, Golden Glen, Samish Bay, and Sea Breeze.

Fresh, hot mini donuts from Market Mini Donuts. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Don’t forget the donuts — delicious, deep-fried dough rings of love, hot and chewy, right out of the fryer, tossed in some cinnamon sugar, just to remind you that the gods did, in fact, create a perfect universe. Be sure to hit up Market Mini Donuts on the 22nd Avenue end of the Market. You’ll need a little bag of a dozen per person in your party. (I’m here to help.)

Mixed baby kales from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Lest you think we’ve foregone anything that will actually require you to do any prep work in the kitchen this week, I give you these lovely mixed baby kales from Alm Hill Gardens. Fact is, greens have really made a comeback from farms throughout the Market. Remember this time last year, when we wondered if we would ever see the sun again, let alone fresh greens? Not this year. The trees are already blooming, and the greens are young, tender and sweet.

And remember, your Ballard Farmers Market is still chock full of all sorts of goodness for you to prep in your kitchen to your heart’s content — game be damned. Look for meat, seafood, poultry, cheese, all sorts of fruits and veggies, baked goods, sauces, confections, fresh-cut flowers, plants for the garden, wild mushrooms, and on and on. For a fuller accounting of what you’ll find at the Market today, go to “What’s Fresh Now!” in the upper right-hand corner.

Go Saints!

Apres Vin: Local Cooking Oil from Local Grapeseeds.

June 28, 2009
Just a sampling of the many flavors of grapeseed oils made by Prosser's Apres Vin. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Just a sampling of the many flavors of grapeseed oils made by Prosser's Apres Vin. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Welcome an exciting, new vendor this week to Ballard Farmers Market — Apres Vin. The name is French for “after wine,” and it fits what these folks do perfectly. Apres Vin makes grapeseed oil and flour from byproducts of the Washington wine industry in Prosser, in the Yakima Valley. You see, when wineries make wine, they crush a lot of grapes, and these grapes all have seeds. Well, as it turns out, these seeds make very high-grade cooking oils and flours. In fact, grapeseed oil is prized for its lusciousness, its high smoke point and its nutritional value, including beneficial fats and antioxidants. Grapeseed Flour also has these nutritional benefits, and it is gluten-free.

Grapeseed flour is as diverse as the wine grapes from which it comes. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Grapeseed flour is as diverse as the wine grapes from which it comes. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Apres Vin’s grapeseed oils and flours retain the distinct flavors of the wine grape varietals from which they come, and their oils come in a wide range of flavors. These are truly artisan products that will provide Market customers with two more items for their kitchens that they will no longer have to get at the grocery or specialty store. No need for exotic oils imported from faraway places. You can get it, made in Washington, right at your friendly neighborhood farmers market. Look for Apres Vin to be set up with Sound Bites Spreads, Sauces and Crackers, which, by the way, uses Apres Vin products in all of its own products.

Apres Vin owners, Eric & Lori, left, with Sound Bites owners Stephen & Rich at Ballard Farmers Market. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Apres Vin owners, Eric & Lori, left, with Sound Bites owners Stephen & Rich at Ballard Farmers Market. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.