Posts Tagged ‘goat milk soap’

Sunday, December 2nd: ‘Tis The Holiday Season At Your Ballard Farmers Market!

December 2, 2012
Fresh holiday wreathes from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh holiday wreathes from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey kids, it’s December! Allow me to be the 187th person to wish you Happy Holidays! We’re past Thanksgiving already, and the college football season is over. Heck, Chanukah begins next Saturday night at sundown. We are deep in it, folks. Look, it’s been some crazy times over the last year in our community, our nation, our planet. Yet, we’re still here. How’s about we take a step back, do some reflecting, and make this time of year a little extra special this year. I don’t mean go to the mall and buy your sweetie that jewelry or perfume you saw on TV that 1,263,982 other people are going to buy for their sweeties this year. I mean, how friggin’ special a gift is that? Besides, you’ve been carrying on about how Bain Capital or the Obama Administration have been killing American jobs for the last 12 months, right? Well, why don’t you do something about it, while at the same time getting your loved ones something special this year — something unique — which will, of course, make them feel special, too. It’s easy. Just head on down to your Ballard Farmers Market and visit any of our vendors. Everything you’ll find is unique, special, and locally produced by them. That means you’ll be directly supporting good American jobs while getting something special. Pretty cool, huh? Why not start with one of these lovely holiday wreathes from our friends at Alm Hill Gardens. They are made carefully, by hand, from things growing on the farm up in Everson. Good luck getting the guys at the Big Box store to tell you what farm their wreathes and trees came from. Here, you’re getting them directly from the farmers!

Gingerbread from Tall Grass Bakery. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Gingerbread from Tall Grass Bakery. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nothing says the holidays like luscious holiday breads, right? Their smell, their appearance and their flavor accent the season like few other things. Sometimes, I think we’ve gotten so absorbed in our technology that we forget the power of our senses and our experiences. I look at this gorgeous loaf of gingerbread from Tall Grass Bakery, though, and I can just smell it… and my mind fills with memories and fond associations. That December it snowed so much. A party with friends, candles, a pot of warm glüg, and festive music on a cold, wet, blustery night. Ah. Work can wait until January.

Knitted scarves from Gypsy Beaded Creations. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Knitted scarves from Gypsy Beaded Creations. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Like I was saying before, what you will find at your Ballard Farmers Market is produced by the people selling it. Like these beautiful knitted scarves from Gypsy Beaded Creations. In fact, you’ll likely find Corrine knitting her next work of wearable art right at the Market. You won’t get much more unique a gift than this, and it’ll come with an actual, local face behind it — someone you know you supported with your holiday gift-giving dollars. And your loved ones will look fabulous and stay warm and cozy, too!

Canned local albacore tuna in a variety of flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Canned local albacore tuna in a variety of flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

When I was editing photos for this week’s post, it pleased me to find this one. It is so colorful, isn’t it? Like a brilliant string of festive lights or old-fashioned glass ornaments. And yet, what it is is (I think I just had a Bill Clinton flashback) canned local albacore tuna in many flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Yup, it is time for their monthly visit to your Ballard Farmers Market today. And you’ll want plenty of their tunaliciousness around for the holidays. Not just the canned stuff, but frozen sashimi grade tuna loinstuna loxsmoked tuna and more! Mmm. I just had some for dinner. And remember, canned tuna makes a great stocking stuffer!

Goat milk soap from Harmony's Way. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Goat milk soap from Harmony’s Way. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Do you have sensitive skin? Does someone you love? Goat milk soap is incredible gentle on your skin — luxurious, I dare say. It is creamy and mild, and just plain lovely. Lucky us, we actually have a local goat dairy making us these beautiful bars of goat milk soap from the milk of their own goats right here at your Ballard Farmers Market. Harmony’s Way hails from over in Chimacum, on the Olympic Peninsula, just south of Port Townsend. They make their soaps in a variety of scents, shapes and sizes, and you can even get it plain, if you like. If yours is a family that already puts nice soaps in each others stockings, why not get some made locally, direct not only from the soap maker, but from the soap farmer!

Piñata apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Piñata apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You know, some folks even put apples in each others stockings. Funny that. But hey, don’t you associate apples with the holidays? You bake them, sauce them, make pies and crisps with them. And why not? They are our dominant local fruit this time of year. Still, when it comes to festive, you really can’t ask for an apple that just sounds more like a party waiting to happen than these piñata apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Just don’t go hanging them from a low-hanging branch and swinging a big stick at them blindfolded. Instead of a shower of candy, you’re gonna get covered with little, moist bits of apple pulp.

Ornamental gourds from Boistfort Valley Farm.Decorative faceplates for your electrical outlets and switches from Dimensional  Colors. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ornamental gourds from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, ornamental gourds from Boistfort Valley Farm do not make good stocking stuffers, regardless of the fact that they will fit nicely into most stockings. Still, they do make for a lovely, decorative addition to your holiday decking of the halls. Just don’t try to eat them. Unlike their winter squash cousins, this gourds ain’t for eating, and you’ll probably break your knife or cut off a finger trying to cut them open anyway. Instead, surround some candles with them on your dinner table, add them to your mantle, or arrange them with some other fun decorations on an end or coffee table.

Seasoned salts from Rockridge Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Seasoned salts from Rockridge Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Here’s a great stocking stuffer for the foodie in your life, and if you are shopping at your Ballard Farmers Market, you are bound to have a foodie or three in your life. These are seasoned salts from Rockridge Orchards. They’ve got them seasoned with all different sorts of things, from herbs and spices to local applewood smoke. Of course, we won’t tell anyone if you realize that the foodie in your life is actually you, and you just buy them for yourself. Heck, take them home, wrap them up and put them in your own stocking, and then watch how confused it will make the rest of the family!

Cirrus Wood from Coal-Free Washington. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cirrus Wood from Coal-Free Washington. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cirrus Wood from Coal-Free Washington created a photo essay at your Ballard Farmers Market last week of vendors against huge coal trains coming through Ballard and local farmlands carrying coal from Montana and Wyoming to coastal ports for shipping to China. You can see his photo essay, and learn more about the issue, on their Facebook page.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, July 31st: Of Camera Crews, Farmers Out Standing In Their Fields, Legends Of The Biz & Other-Worldly Stone Fruit.

July 31, 2011

A film crew from the Port of Seattle shoots at Ballard Farmers Market on July 24, 2011. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

There was a camera crew from the Port of Seattle at your Ballard Farmers Market last Sunday. Why? Well, apparently there is some sort of international conference of ports meeting in Seattle next month, and they are putting together a presentation on all the great things Seattle has to offer. And needless to say, though I will anyway, no such presentation would be complete without a segment on your Ballard Farmers Market. After all, Ballard Farmers Market is Seattle’s favorite farmers market, right? The question I have for you now, all 3,000 or so of you who will read this epistle this week, is do you believe Ballard Farmers Market is America’s Favorite Farmers Market? Because we need your vote! And don’t get all, “But we want to keep this our little secret” Seattleite on me, either. Besides the fact that that ship has already sailed, if we win this year, we get $$ to help us make the Market even better, and you get free “No Farms, No Food” canvas bags! So please, take a moment to vote for us now. It is the simplest thing you can do today to thank us for all the hard work we put in to bring you this grand market every week, year-round, rain, sun, snow, wind. And thank you!

Donut Peaches from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Aliens!!! No, just donut peaches from Collins Family Orchards. Sure, they look like a weird flying saucer, and some even get nicknamed “Saturn peaches.” Whatever you wanna call ’em, I just call ’em delicious. Yep, these are my favorite peaches, bar none. Amongst the newest of peach varieties, I remember when I first encountered them while I stayed on a farm in Naches in 1999, just a few miles from Selah, where these particular donut peaches, above, are grown. It is perfect fruit growing territory, as the fruit at Collins Family Orchards will tell you.

Eric Sundstrom of Silver Springs Creamery chats with one of the girls. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Actually, one of the perks of my job is that I get to visit the farms represented at the Market. This past week, I had the pleasure of visiting several, including Silver Springs Creamery, way up north in Lynden, so close to the Canadian border that there were more cars with BC plates than Washington plates. And if a picture speaks a thousand words, this one speaks for farmer Eric Sundstrom’s close relationship with the cows and goats that produce the extraordinary milk he brings to Market every Sunday for us to enjoy. As we walked out into the pasture to meet the girls, they all came right over to us to say hi. And among the many things I learned from Eric during my visit is that healthy jersey cows that will produce plenty of good milk should actually show some ribs in their profile, like the one in the photo above. Eric said that at first, he thought these were unhealthy cows, but as he learned the business, he found out that it’s just the opposite for dairy cows. And the proof is in the milk, yogurt and cheese he brings to Market every Sunday. If you haven’t tried it yet, you are really missing out.

Raspberries from Jessie's Berries. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I also got to visit Jessie’s Berries on Fir Island, near Mount Vernon, where I got to walk through the rows of raspberries, doing plenty of quality control as I did. Sorry, I don’t have photos from there, as it was raining like crazy on Monday, and my camera and water just don’t mix well. And if you are wondering why strawberries are now gone, you can blame that rain. But hey, if we can get, finally, a few weeks of warm and dry, we may get us another round of strawberries in a few weeks.

Sweet corn from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey, it’s sweet corn season folks. This corn is from Lyall Farms. I got to visit their farms a couple of years ago. This corn grows on their property in Sunnyside, where it’s hotter and drier than just about anywhere else in the state. Good corn-growing territory. Alan plants several successions of sweet corn varieties, so he can get about eight weeks of corn harvest out of it. Hey, that means we’ve still got seven weeks to go!

Succulents from Phocas Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

After a brief hiatus, Phocas Farms is back at your Ballard Farmers Market. In fact, this will be the first late-summer we’ve got Jim here with his gorgeous succulents, and this time of year, they are in all their glory, hatching chicks, throwing flowers and exploding with color. You can plant succulents easily any time of year. But this time of year, you can really get a sense of what they look like at their peak.

Pickling cukes from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Perfect pickling cucumbers from Stoney Plains. You know, these pickling cukes always remind me of the late Bob Meyer, the patriarch of Stoney Plains, and a founding farmer of many farmers markets in Washington, as well as the Washington Tilth Producers. For years, I have made my pickles using these cukes. And I always think of my friend, Bob, and I miss him. But he lives on in the wonderful produce his family still brings to Market every week, year round. You can order your pickling cukes by the 25 pound bag from Stoney Plains, sized to your needs, and they can even set you up with pickling dill, also now in season.

Bath-sized plain goat milk soap from Harmony's Way. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Harmony’s Way raises milk goats. And with the milk those goats produce, they make soap. This soap. See, goat milk soap is very mild on your skin, so if you are sensitive to many other soaps, you might want to give this soap a try. And this particular soap, pictured above, is their new bath-sized bar of plain, as in scent-free, goat milk soap. Treat yourself to some soapilicious luxury today!

Clayton Burrows of Alm Hill Gardens in one of the tomato hot houses. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Another farm I visited this past week was Alm Hill Gardens. Here, farm manager Clayton Burrows stands in one of their tomato hot houses and explains the difference between determinant and indeterminant tomato plants. The indeterminant ones will just keep growing taller and taller, producing more and more fruit, so farmers string them up like this in hot houses to help them do their thing. You can see lots of ripening beefsteak tomatoes lower on these plants. Indeed, some of these very tomatoes will likely be at your Ballard Farmers Market today!

Romanian beef sausages in fresh sauce by Chef Tara Mielke of La Spiga. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sea Breeze Farm makes a lot of amazing artisan sausages. One of my favorites is this Romanian beef sausage, but they don’t make it very often. In fact, I’ve been begging them to make it for months! Well, they have it today. In the photo above, Chef Tara Miekle of La Spiga prepared some on Friday at our Madrona Farmers Market in a fresh sauce she made from Market tomatoes, garlic, onions and fennel, then sliced and served it on some Tall Grass baguette. Oh, yeah, baby. That’s living!

There is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now. And please remember to vote for your Ballard Farmers Market in the 2011 America’s Favorite Farmers Market Contest!

Sunday, December 12: Pork Bellies, Paprika, Lamb Skins, Smoked White King Salmon, All The Kale You Can Eat (for a price), Great Holiday Gifts & Miner’s Lettuce (really)!!!

December 11, 2010

A Mother's Day 2009 visit to Ballard Farmers Market from the entire family Vojkovich of Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

See how good looking you can be when you eat nothing but the bounty found at your Ballard Farmers Market? Actually, Eiko (left), Nicole & George Vojkovich of Skagit River Ranch are in large part responsible for keeping us all healthy and good looking around here with all of their pasture-finished, certified organic beef, pork, chicken, eggs, and for my money, the best sweet Italian sausage around these parts. Are you looking for a special holiday roast? Click through to their website (or ask them at the Market) to see how to call them to pre-order your whole beef tenderloins, prime rib roasts, boneless hams and pork bellies now, and they’ll deliver them to you at the Market on December 19th.

Spicy and delicious paprikas from Some Like It Hott! Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Welcome back, Some Like It Hott! Just in time to put some kick into your holidays. Charlie Bodony got his itch for all things paprika from his Transylvanian ancestors, and now he raises, dries, smokes and grinds his own paprikas, in the style of his elders, in Port Townsend. His paprikas range from mild to atomic, with a wide variety of flavors and colors. And don’t be intimidated by those small bottles. A little goes a long way. Oh, and ask if he’s got any of his homemade liquid smoke. He makes it from the condensation created when he alder smokes his chili peppers.

Fresh, tasty miner's lettuce from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I suppose that, given how screwed up the growing seasons have been this year, we should not be surprised by the appearance of miner’s lettuce from Full Circle Farm in December, instead of February. Miner’s lettuce is native to these parts, and it got its name when miners foraged it for food back in the late 1800s. Still widely found growing wild all over Western Washington in the late winter and early spring, it is now also cultivated by many local farmers. It’s leaves have a spinachy toothsomeness to them, though the flavor is very mild, and it takes well to a simple dressing of olive oil and lemon juice with some pinenuts or sprinkled over a pizza or gratin raw after they’re done cooking.

Fun hair barrettes from Solstice Designs. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Solstice Designs has all manner of lovely items to pretty up  yourself, or that special someone, this holiday season. (Not that you need any prettying up, mind you.) You’ll find fun and inspired earrings, pendants, necklaces, and more, including these great barrettes that’ll have all your friends asking, “where did you get that?”

Gift sampler 3-packs of canned tuna from Fishing Vessel St. Tuna. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

For the person who thinks they have everything, how about a gift 3-pack of canned tuna from Fishing Vessel St. Jude? They get three of St. Jude’s most popular versions of their canned tuna in a handy steel can, complete with colorful, decorative and informative label. And the tuna contained therein is, frankly, the best canned tuna they will find anywhere. Plus, it’s low mercury and high in omega fatty acids. Just don’t drain off the liquid. They don’t add water. That liquid is the delicious and nutritious fats from the tuna itself!

Sheep skins from Olsen Farms. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Olsen Farms has lotsa potatoes, beef, pork, lamb, bacon, sausage, ham, and right now, a limited number of sheep skins. These gorgeous sheep skins are soft, warm, and make for a cozy Hollywood moment with someone special in front of a crackling fireplace with a bottle of red wine from Sea Breeze or Lopez Island. And never fear, they are also washable, for when you ruin the moment by spilling that red wine on it. They’ve got about a dozen going for $120 each, and they go fast every year, so get yours early!

Dried fava beans from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Stoney Plains had a rockin’ year for fava beans, and lucky for us, they dried some of them. Talk about the ultimate year-round farm. Greens and beans all winter long! So enjoy this new addition to the dried bean lineup at your Ballard Farmers Market, and enjoy your fava beans all winter long.

Adam Lewis, from House Of The Sun raw & vegan foods, stands behind lots of Nash's kale. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

From the category of “a picture speaks a thousand words” comes this photo of Adam from House Of The Sun raw and vegan foods holding up their deliciously famous kale chips while he stands behind a huge pile of Nash’s kale that he will use to make more kale chips. It is one thing to be a local food processor who makes a great product. It is another to be one who makes that great product from local ingredients!

Red storage onions from Anselmo's. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Anselmo’s, your Ballard Farmers Market’s founding farmer, is always a great source for all things onions, shallots and garlic. Just take a gander at these beautiful red storage onions, for instance. Just think of the Christmas morning bagels and lox with a slice of one of these lovelies!

Goat milk soap from Harmony's Way. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Is your skin sensitive to many soaps? Are you looking for something milder? How about goat milk soap from Harmony’s Way in Chimicum? They raise and milk their own goats to make this wonderful soap, and they offer it in a variety of shapes, sizes, scents and designs. And while maybe a lot of the girlier looking and smelling bars won’t appeal to us manly men, these new standard-sized rectangular bars (above) with rugged, manly aromas will suit us just fine, so we can still look tough, even while pampering our delicate skin.

Smoked whole sides of white king salmon from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Are you entertaining an uppity bunch this holiday season — you know, the kind that will only accept the best nibbles laid out in front of them? Then pickup a side of smoked white king salmon from Wilson Fish. White salmon is the oiliest, most moist of all salmon, and when smoked, it is beyond divine. Lay one of these suckers out with your holiday spread, then scoff at your friends’ tables when you go to their parties!

Milk, cream and butter from Golden Glen Creamery. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You will be spending a lot of time in the kitchen over the next few weeks preparing all sorts of delicious recipes that call for butter, cream and milk. Lucky for you, Golden Glen Creamery has you covered. Bottled in refillable glass bottles for superior flavor and a kindness to the environment, their milk and cream has few rivals, and their farmstead butter is the only farmstead butter made in Washington. But cream supplies are limited, so get there early!

There is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check the What’s Fresh Now! listings in the upper right-hand corner of this page for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now. But please note that due to our recent cold weather, some crops may not be available as anticipated.

Sunday, April 18th: Oxbow, Ayala & Red Barn Farms Returns!

April 17, 2010

Oxbow Farm's Luke Woodward proudly showing off his prized carrots. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Oxbow Farm is just one of the several farms returning to your Ballard Farmers Market today for the 2010 season. Given the sassy tone of his recent emails, it sounds like Luke is chomping at the bit to be back at the Market today. Luke says he will have purple sprouting broccoli, some baby carrots, cauliflower rapini, tomato plants, and some other things they manage to liberate from the farm.

Ramon Ayala examines blossoms and young fruit on one of his cherry trees in Sunnyside. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ayala Farms is back at Ballard Farmers Market today with asparagus. Ramon Ayala has 120 acres of asparagus near Sunnyside, Washington, as well as fruit trees, like the cherry tree he is tending above, and he grows a wide variety of vegetables and melons, too.

Julie from Red Barn Farm examining some of her vegetable starts. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Back with gorgeous vegetable starts today is Red Barn Farm from Enumclaw. Red Barn is located in the shadow of Mt. Rainier on damp, fertile volcanic soil that produces spectacular food for our tables. In fact, I do believe the finest rutabagas I have ever eaten came from Red Barn.

A smoked ham hock and some lovely cheese from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Every week brings new deliciousness from Sea Breeze Farm. From fresh meat and poultry to charcuterie to milk, wine, eggs and cheese, Sea Breeze does it old school out of their refer cases. I like just checking out their cases every Sunday to see what surprises they hold, and then building a meal around them.

Ravishing radishes from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Spring means some much rebirth and goodness at the Market, but perhaps above all else, spring means radishes, like these from Full Circle Farm. Radishes are beautiful, colorful, spicy, sweet, round, cylindrical, and just plain delicious. And unlike other root crops, they don’t like the cold, making them a true arbiter of spring, and as good a reason as any to soldier through any winter.

Sweet potatoes from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

A holdover from fall, these sweet potatoes from Lyall Farms won’t be around for much longer. Lyall Farms was the first farm ever to bring Washington sweet potatoes to Ballard Farmers Market this past fall. And they are wonderful. I had some for dinner last night. Deeply sweet, they roast up beautifully in the oven, or you can cube and steam them , then mash them with canned chipotles in adobo sauce and a touch maple syrup for a peppy side to a steak.

Goat milk soap from Harmonys Way Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Harmonys Way Farm, on the Olympic Peninsula, makes goat milk soap from the milk of its own goats. Goat milk soap is very mild — perfect for people who have skin sensitive to stronger soaps. It is creamy and delicate. If you have been looking for a mild soap, treat yourself to some goat milk soap from Harmonys Way today.

Red cabbage starts from Sunseed Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sunseed Farm returned to Ballard Farmers Market recently with a fantastic selection of vegetable, herb and flower starts for your garden. Just imagine these red cabbage starts coming to maturity this summer, making a great cole slaw for that summer picnic. Take a look at all they have to offer today, and plant your own little Victory Garden.

Wild wood sorrel from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Our local forests continue to offer up more and more spring delicacies, like this wood sorrel. Find it, and other wild foods, from Foraged & Found Edibles.

Molasses ginger caramels from Jonboy Caramels. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Looking for some sweets for the sweet? How about some Jonboy Caramels. They make them from local cream and butter, and they rock. Stop by for a sample. And since my dentist told me I had to choose between my cap and J0nboy’s caramels, I ask you to enjoy as many of these lovelies as you can, so that I might still enjoy them, if only vicariously through you.

German, Italian and andouille sausages from Olsen Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Olsen Farms has beef brisket on sale this week for $7/pound, and lamb loin chops for $19/pound. Oh, and they have a whole lot of sausages just waiting for you to enjoy, too. They even have some seed potatoes, if you want to grow some of your own. Got Soup? has the following soup offerings this week: Broccoli Cheese; Cioppino; Corn & Shiitake; and Orange & Cumin Sweet Potato.

And remember, your Ballard Farmers Market is chock full of all sorts of goodness for  your kitchen, from meat, seafood, poultry, cheese, to all sorts of fruits and veggies, baked goods, sauces, confections, fresh-cut flowers and fresh milled flours, plants for the garden, wild mushrooms, and on and on. For a fuller accounting of what you’ll find at the Market today, go to “What’s Fresh Now!” in the upper right-hand corner.