Posts Tagged ‘gourds’

Sunday, November 16th: Local Hazelnuts, Holiday Hams, Sweet Squash, Perfect Pears, Soul-Warming Teas & More!

November 15, 2014
Hams for the holidays from Olsen Farms at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Hams for the holidays from Olsen Farms at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s been c-c-c-c-c-o-l-d-d-d-d this past week, and that means we may be missing some crops today. But hey, it could be worse. We could live in Fargo, where you needed a jackhammer to harvest potatoes this week. Guess what else? There are just 11 days left until Thanksgiving! Have you gotten your turkey or ham yet? If not, better snap to it. You can still arrange for hams from Olsen Farms or Skagit River Ranch, and Growing Things Farm still has a few turkeys left, but you need to buy or reserve them today for delivery next Sunday!

(BTW, if you love being able to get meat, poultry, seafood, cheese, eggs and other animal products at your Ballard Farmers Market, please read our Tuesday blog post about ridiculously high proposed new health permit fees from King County that could drive some farms out of farmers markets and some markets in the county out of business. We need your help writing letters and attending meetings on behalf of your favorite farms and markets!)

Hazelnuts from Holmquist Hazelnuts at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Hazelnuts from Holmquist Hazelnut Orchards at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

This time of year, I am just nuts for nuts. Aren’t you? And lucky for us, Washington’s own Holmquist Hazelnut Orchards is returning today to your Ballard Farmers Markets after several years’ absence! Up in Whatcom County, they grown some of the finest hazelnuts you will ever taste anywhere. They are big, fresh and sweet. They have them raw, roasted, seasoned in a wide variety of flavors, and they even offer some absolutely fabulous hazelnut oil, great for finishing soups, salads and other dishes.

Beautiful carnival winter squash from Growing Things Farm at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Beautiful carnival winter squash from Growing Things Farm at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Growing Things Farm also has lots of gorgeous winter squash and pumpkins right now. Choose from a couple of varieties of kabocha squashsweet dumpling squashred kuri squashJarradhale pumpkins, or these beautiful carnival squash.

Crispy pears from Collins Family Orchards at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Crispy pears from Collins Family Orchards at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

These are crispy pears from Collins Family Orchards. Honestly, I don’t remember seeing them in previous years. So I did what any farmers market blogger worth his salt would do… because I care about you. I got one, and I ate it. (It’s a dirty job, but someone has to do it!) These cute little pears are quite juicy and not overbearingly sweet. I quite enjoyed mine. I think you’ll enjoy these, too!

Fresh Keta Ikura from Loki Fish at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh Keta Ikura from Loki Fish at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

This past Thursday may have marked the last day in the 2014 Puget Sound Keta salmon fishing season, so today may be your last day to enjoy fresh Keta salmon from Loki Fish. They actually catch this keta in the center of Puget Sound, straight out from Magnolia Bluff. And besides the versatile fillets Loki offers, they also take Keta roe (eggs) and cure them with salt to make ikura. This local delicacy is great for the holidays. I love it on some Tall Grass Bakery baguette with some truffled fromage from Mt. Townsend Creamery.

Herbal teas from Harbor Herbalist at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Ben Chandler.

Herbal teas from Harbor Herbalist at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Ben Chandler.

Cold nights and approaching holidays call for tea. Why not try some local herbal teas from Harbor Herbalist this fall? They are blended with many ingredients grown on Vashon Island and other local farms, and they come in a terrific selection of delicious blends. Some will relax you. Some will wake you. Some with help cure what ails you. And some will even put you in the mood. Now, that’s a tea that will warm you up, people! And it makes a great stocking stuffer, too!

Kale, zucchini & collard chips from House of the Sun at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Kale, zucchini & collard chips from House of the Sun at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

There are only two more Sundays for House of the Sun Raw & Vegan Foods at your Ballard Farmers Market. Adam is retiring his business and moving on to other adventures. So stop by now for all the kale chips you can carry to your car! And give the big lug a hug and a thank you, while you’re at it!

Serrano chile peppers from Stoney Plains Organic Farm at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Serrano chile peppers from Stoney Plains Organic Farm at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Peppers are pretty much done for this year. Pretty much, I say, save for the fact that Stoney Plains Organic Farm harvested a LOT of them before the cold set it, and today, they’ll have some left just for you at your Ballard Farmers Market! They should still have jalapenospoblanos and some of these lovely serrano peppers. These… and red sunchokes, too!

Decorative gourds from Boistfort Valley Farm at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Decorative gourds from Boistfort Valley Farm at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

We finish our weekend installment this week with these pretty ornamental gourds from Boistfort Valley Farm. They are perfect for sprucing up your home for fall. Boistfort also has plenty of the edible gourds, too — winter squash and pumpkins, as well as garlichoneyrutabagasparsnips and lots of other fall localiciousness!

Don’t forget to check out this week’s midweek blog post for more information on what you’ll find today at you Ballard Farmers Market. And there is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, October 27th: Fresh Cranberries, Apple Cider, Old World Cooking Oil, Ornamental Gourds, Sweet Potato Chips & More!

October 26, 2013

We are sad to report the loss of one of our longtime vendors over this past weekend. Jaroslav “Jerry” Makovicka, of Little Prague European Bakery, passed away suddenly on Saturday, October 19th. He was a fixture at Ballard Farmers Market for many years, selling his wife Marie’s famous Czech pastries. He always had a smile and a joke to share through his thick Czech accent. Our thoughts are with Marie and his family and friends. (A memorial service will be held next Tuesday, October 29th at noon in Lynnwood. For info, or if you wish to share a memory, you can also do so at this link. If you wish to make a cash contribution to help the family with expenses at this time, you can do so at the Market Information Desk this Sunday at Ballard Farmers Market.)

Fresh, local cranberries from Bloom Creek Cranberry Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh, local cranberries from Bloom Creek Cranberry Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is fresh cranberry season at your Ballard Farmers Market! Bloom Creek Cranberry Farm, from Olympia, returns today with their beautiful fresh cranberries. Time to make that homemade cranberry sauce, cranberry juice and all manner of cranberriliciousness. But they are only around for a few weeks, so get them now, while you can!

Fava bean leaves from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fava bean leaves from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Stoney Plains Organic Farms has fava bean leaves now, for a few weeks. Yes, fava bean leaves. Fava beans grow a lot like peas, and like peas, you can eat the leaves, too. Try giving some a quick sauté for dinner tonight!

Camelina cooking oil from Old World Oils. Photo courtesy Old World Oils.

Camelina cooking oil from Ole World Oils. Photo courtesy Old World Oils.

Please welcome a new farm vendor to your Ballard Farmers Market: Ole World Oils and their Camelina Gold cooking oil. Camelina is an ancient seed oil crop that is non-GMO, high in omega-3 fatty acids. packed with antioxidants, and has a very high (475 degrees) smoke point. It is cold-pressed and unrefined. The Greenwalt family was among the original homestead farmers in Eastern Washington in the late 1800s, and they have been farming just west of Ritzville for over 110 years. Not only does camelina, a member of the mustard family, make for great cooking oil, it also helps the farm maintain healthier soils, allowing them to farm more sustainable.

Fresh apple cider from Jerzy Boyz.  Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh apple cider from Jerzy Boyz. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey kids! Jerzy Boyz has fresh apple cider! This stuff is like the old-school cider you remember as a kid, before everything had to be cooked to death. Mind you, this is pasteurized. It has to be now. But it is minimally processed, and it is fabulous! (Oh, and it’s organic, too.)

FreshBucks_LogoDo you have WIC or Senior Farmers Market Checks or Fresh Bucks coupons that are about to expire on October 31st? Be sure to use them today at your Ballard Farmers Market!

Fresh ducks from Stokesberry Organic Poultry. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh ducks from Stokesberry Sustainable Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Stokesberry Sustainable Farm has fresh ducks this week, and they should have more next week. They are certified organic, and they are delicious! But here’s a tip: if you try to buy one this week and they are sold out, be sure to reserve one for next week!  Mmm. Fresh duck.

Shallots from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Shallots from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These beautiful, big shallots are from One Leaf Farm, and they have plenty of them. 2013 was a stellar year for onions, garlic and shallots, and besides tasting wonderful, these foods are full of essential nutrients to keep the doctor away, and lots of other things, too!

Taylor's Gold pears from Booth Canyon Orchard. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Taylor’s Gold pears from Booth Canyon Orchard. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This week’s heirloom pear of the week from Booth Canyon Orchard is Taylor’s Gold pears. Originally from New Zealand, these organic lovelies are grown in the Methow Valley in the North Cascades. Booth Canyon has a limited supply of these, and of all of their fruit, this year due to late summer storm damage, and to that end, they will miss the next two weeks of your Ballard Farmers Market, so stock up now, while you can!

Sweet potato chips from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sweet potato chips from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You know and love sweet potatoes from Lyall Farms, right? Well, now you can also get these sweet potato chips from Lyall Farms! They are offering them with a couple different types of seasonings, from sweet to savory. Try something a little different — a local chip that also comes with all the goodness and flavor of local sweet potatoes!

Sweet peppers from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sweet peppers from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is last call for sweet peppers and all things nightshade from Alvarez Organic Farms. The nights have gotten colder over in Mabton, and that means the peppers and eggplants are done producing. Enjoy them this week for one last time!

New fall flavors from Soda Jerk Sodas. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

New fall flavors from Soda Jerk Sodas. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Soda Jerk Sodas has rolled out some new fall flavors, like this Theo Chocolate soda (left), just in time for Halloween, Lemon Lavender and Sour Apple (right). The sun is back today. Celebrate with a fresh, local soda! (And please remember to vote. Every vote will be critical this year, and several items on your ballot will directly affect your Ballard Farmers Market.)

Ornamental gourds from Alm HIll Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ornamental gourds from Alm HIll Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Dress your house up for fall with these ornamental gourds from Alm Hill Gardens (a.k.a., Growing Washington). Not only do they complete your Halloween display, but they will round out your Thanksgiving table, too!

A fall flower bouquet from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

A fall flower bouquet from Children’s Garden. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And while you are gussying up your house, hows about a gorgeous bouquet of fall flowers from Children’s Garden? You won’t find a bouquet like this at any Big Box store, and these are local, fresh, unique and fit the season perfectly!

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, December 2nd: ‘Tis The Holiday Season At Your Ballard Farmers Market!

December 2, 2012
Fresh holiday wreathes from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh holiday wreathes from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey kids, it’s December! Allow me to be the 187th person to wish you Happy Holidays! We’re past Thanksgiving already, and the college football season is over. Heck, Chanukah begins next Saturday night at sundown. We are deep in it, folks. Look, it’s been some crazy times over the last year in our community, our nation, our planet. Yet, we’re still here. How’s about we take a step back, do some reflecting, and make this time of year a little extra special this year. I don’t mean go to the mall and buy your sweetie that jewelry or perfume you saw on TV that 1,263,982 other people are going to buy for their sweeties this year. I mean, how friggin’ special a gift is that? Besides, you’ve been carrying on about how Bain Capital or the Obama Administration have been killing American jobs for the last 12 months, right? Well, why don’t you do something about it, while at the same time getting your loved ones something special this year — something unique — which will, of course, make them feel special, too. It’s easy. Just head on down to your Ballard Farmers Market and visit any of our vendors. Everything you’ll find is unique, special, and locally produced by them. That means you’ll be directly supporting good American jobs while getting something special. Pretty cool, huh? Why not start with one of these lovely holiday wreathes from our friends at Alm Hill Gardens. They are made carefully, by hand, from things growing on the farm up in Everson. Good luck getting the guys at the Big Box store to tell you what farm their wreathes and trees came from. Here, you’re getting them directly from the farmers!

Gingerbread from Tall Grass Bakery. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Gingerbread from Tall Grass Bakery. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nothing says the holidays like luscious holiday breads, right? Their smell, their appearance and their flavor accent the season like few other things. Sometimes, I think we’ve gotten so absorbed in our technology that we forget the power of our senses and our experiences. I look at this gorgeous loaf of gingerbread from Tall Grass Bakery, though, and I can just smell it… and my mind fills with memories and fond associations. That December it snowed so much. A party with friends, candles, a pot of warm glüg, and festive music on a cold, wet, blustery night. Ah. Work can wait until January.

Knitted scarves from Gypsy Beaded Creations. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Knitted scarves from Gypsy Beaded Creations. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Like I was saying before, what you will find at your Ballard Farmers Market is produced by the people selling it. Like these beautiful knitted scarves from Gypsy Beaded Creations. In fact, you’ll likely find Corrine knitting her next work of wearable art right at the Market. You won’t get much more unique a gift than this, and it’ll come with an actual, local face behind it — someone you know you supported with your holiday gift-giving dollars. And your loved ones will look fabulous and stay warm and cozy, too!

Canned local albacore tuna in a variety of flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Canned local albacore tuna in a variety of flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

When I was editing photos for this week’s post, it pleased me to find this one. It is so colorful, isn’t it? Like a brilliant string of festive lights or old-fashioned glass ornaments. And yet, what it is is (I think I just had a Bill Clinton flashback) canned local albacore tuna in many flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Yup, it is time for their monthly visit to your Ballard Farmers Market today. And you’ll want plenty of their tunaliciousness around for the holidays. Not just the canned stuff, but frozen sashimi grade tuna loinstuna loxsmoked tuna and more! Mmm. I just had some for dinner. And remember, canned tuna makes a great stocking stuffer!

Goat milk soap from Harmony's Way. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Goat milk soap from Harmony’s Way. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Do you have sensitive skin? Does someone you love? Goat milk soap is incredible gentle on your skin — luxurious, I dare say. It is creamy and mild, and just plain lovely. Lucky us, we actually have a local goat dairy making us these beautiful bars of goat milk soap from the milk of their own goats right here at your Ballard Farmers Market. Harmony’s Way hails from over in Chimacum, on the Olympic Peninsula, just south of Port Townsend. They make their soaps in a variety of scents, shapes and sizes, and you can even get it plain, if you like. If yours is a family that already puts nice soaps in each others stockings, why not get some made locally, direct not only from the soap maker, but from the soap farmer!

Piñata apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Piñata apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You know, some folks even put apples in each others stockings. Funny that. But hey, don’t you associate apples with the holidays? You bake them, sauce them, make pies and crisps with them. And why not? They are our dominant local fruit this time of year. Still, when it comes to festive, you really can’t ask for an apple that just sounds more like a party waiting to happen than these piñata apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Just don’t go hanging them from a low-hanging branch and swinging a big stick at them blindfolded. Instead of a shower of candy, you’re gonna get covered with little, moist bits of apple pulp.

Ornamental gourds from Boistfort Valley Farm.Decorative faceplates for your electrical outlets and switches from Dimensional  Colors. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ornamental gourds from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, ornamental gourds from Boistfort Valley Farm do not make good stocking stuffers, regardless of the fact that they will fit nicely into most stockings. Still, they do make for a lovely, decorative addition to your holiday decking of the halls. Just don’t try to eat them. Unlike their winter squash cousins, this gourds ain’t for eating, and you’ll probably break your knife or cut off a finger trying to cut them open anyway. Instead, surround some candles with them on your dinner table, add them to your mantle, or arrange them with some other fun decorations on an end or coffee table.

Seasoned salts from Rockridge Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Seasoned salts from Rockridge Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Here’s a great stocking stuffer for the foodie in your life, and if you are shopping at your Ballard Farmers Market, you are bound to have a foodie or three in your life. These are seasoned salts from Rockridge Orchards. They’ve got them seasoned with all different sorts of things, from herbs and spices to local applewood smoke. Of course, we won’t tell anyone if you realize that the foodie in your life is actually you, and you just buy them for yourself. Heck, take them home, wrap them up and put them in your own stocking, and then watch how confused it will make the rest of the family!

Cirrus Wood from Coal-Free Washington. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cirrus Wood from Coal-Free Washington. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cirrus Wood from Coal-Free Washington created a photo essay at your Ballard Farmers Market last week of vendors against huge coal trains coming through Ballard and local farmlands carrying coal from Montana and Wyoming to coastal ports for shipping to China. You can see his photo essay, and learn more about the issue, on their Facebook page.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, September 27th: Wild Things, Uncommon Things & Fall Things

September 26, 2009
King Bolete, a.k.a. porcini, mushrooms from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

King Bolete, a.k.a. porcini, mushrooms from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

One of the many wild treats of fall is the King Bolete, or porcini, mushroom, brought to us by the fine folks at Foraged & Found Edibles. They have all kinds of wild-harvested deliciousness now, from chanterelles to lobster mushrooms to wild huckberries to chicken of the woods mushrooms.

Chanterelle mushrooms from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chanterelle mushrooms from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Boistfort Valley Farm also has chanterelle mushrooms now, in addition to an extraordinary selection of produce that includes fresh-cut herbs, gorgeous onions and Ozette potatoes.

Iceberg lettuce from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Iceberg lettuce from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Under the heading of “uncommon things” is this iceberg lettuce from Stoney Plains. Now, maybe you don’t think iceberg lettuce is all that uncommon, but it certainly is uncommon at local farmers markets. If you want the guilty pleasure some fresh, crisp, cool iceberg lettuce that doesn’t come with all those frequent flyer miles or chemicals, give this stuff a try. Oh, and Stoney Plains has fresh garbanzo beans and edamame now, too, but only for a short time.

Pickling, or flowering, dill from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pickling, or flowering, dill from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Given how many people were asking me, “where did you get that?” in recent weeks, I’d say pickling dill comes under the heading of the uncommon at the moment. I have seen it from two farms of late: Children’s Garden (pictured above) and Oxbow.

Everbearing strawberries from Hayton Berry Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Everbearing strawberries from Hayton Berry Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Many folks think that strawberries are only available in the spring, which makes their presence at the Market now uncommon to them. Everbearing strawberries produce fruit right up to the first frost, and these berries from Hayton Berry Farms are delicious. You’ll also find them at Sidhu, and possibly Jessie’s.

Bok choy from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bok choy from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bok choy uncommon, you ask? Yep. While you will find many farms with baby bok choy, very few in the Market have this true bok choy, above, which comes from Nash’s Organic Produce.

Decorative gourds from G&J's Farm in Lynden. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Decorative gourds from G&J's Farm in Lynden. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Gourds are a decorative, non-edible cousin to winter squash with a very hard outer shell that will last for months, especially if you give them a good shellacking. But most of our Market farms focus on its edible cousin, making these lovely gourds from G&J’s Farm uncommon.

Parsnips from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Parsnips from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Parsnips, like these from Full Circle Farm, are a true sign of fall. They are sweet and earthy, and they lend a brilliant flavor contrast to a root roast and pair well with celery root (celeriac) and potatoes in soups and mashes.

Shallots from Pipitone. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Shallots from Pipitone. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Shallots are another great fall crop. They add a special oniony sweetness and pungency to so many dishes. These shallots, from Pipitone, are the kind that grow in clusters, which some argue are the best kind.

Tanner Woods is one of the members of our Ballard Farmers Market staff. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Tanner Woods is one of the members of our Ballard Farmers Market staff. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Let’s finish of this week’s post with something wild and uncommon: Market staff member Tanner Woods. All of the members of your Ballard Farmers Market crew are a bit wild and certainly quite uncommon, though in general, we try not to fall.

For a fuller accounting of what you’ll find this week at your Ballard Farmers Market, click on “What’s Fresh Now!” in the upper right-hand corner, and we’ll see you today at the Market.