Posts Tagged ‘pea shoots’

Sunday, June 27th: Apricots, Summer Squash, Pea Shoots, Tomatoes, Plus Q & A With Olsen Farms’ Butchers!

June 27, 2010

Gorgeous apricots from Pipitone Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s apricot season! Pipitone Farms has their wonderful, organic apricots back at your Ballard Farmers Market today. They just began this year’s harvest on Monday. Come get the first cots of the season. Lyall Farms has new crop apricots today, too. And there are ever more cherries arriving at the Market each week. Among this week’s varieties, you will find Chelan, Tieton, Rainier, Bing and Super Bing cherries, and we welcome the return of Martin Family Orchards this week for another season.

Just thinking about all this delicious stone fruit reminds me of one of the many reasons why Ballard Farmers Market is my favorite farmers market. Is it yours? Then say so! Vote for Ballard Farmers Market now in American Farmland Trust’s America’s Favorite Farmers Markets contest. Just click the link, type “Ballard” in the search field and vote. Please tell your friends and neighbors, too!

Several varieties of summer squash from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Amazing what a little (finally) heat in Eastern Washington will do. In just a week, Alvarez Organic Farms went from having no summer squash to having six different varieties of it. And before this summer is over, they will have upwards of 10 varieties. This week, they have Italian, Lebanese, yellow, 8-Ball, and green zucchini and crookneck squash. They also have a limited supply of squash blossoms, ready to stuff with some goat cheese from Port Madison, bread with some flour from Nash’s and milk from Golden Glen, and fry. Yum!

Field pea shoots from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nash’s is rockin’ the pea shoots right now. These are the shoots of the field peas they will harvest and dry later in the year. I think one of my favorite things about these, besides how delicious they are, is that field peas are used mostly by farmers as a nitrogen-fixing cover crop. Yet Nash’s recognizes that they are a perfectly wonderful food crop, too. In fact, if you count the shoots and the dried peas, they are two wonderful food crops! Nash’s also has some great organic strawberries, pastry flour (for making a base for those strawberries, I suspect), and horse radish (not to be combined with the strawberries, but I bet you could find lots of great savory uses for it).

Rack of lamb, saddle of lamb and standing beef rib roasts from Olsen Farms. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Do you ever look at all the beautiful cuts of meat farms like Olsen Farms bring to Market and wonder things like what part of the animal a cut is from, how it got its name, the best methods for cooking it, etc.? Well, the butchers from Smokey Ridge Meats — that’s Olsen Farms’ butcher shop — will be at your Ballard Farmers Market today to answer your questions. Come see if you can stump the butchers, or just settle that long-standing bet you have with Cousin Jimmy as to the origins of the term, “Boston Butt” used for pork shoulder roasts.

Striped German tomatoes from Billy's. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Billy’s has all sorts of heirloom tomatoes already, including these Striped German tomatoes (above), Big Beef, Paul Robeson, brandywine, Japanese Truffle, vintage wine, and yellow brandywine. Just think of the sauces, salsas, salads, soups and sandwiches you will make out of these babies.

Cauliflower from Summer Run. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Summer Run grows spectacular heads of lettuce, gorgeous chard and collard greens, beautiful broccoli, and this incredible cauliflower. This cauliflower is so wonderful, Chef Dustin Ronspies of Art Of The Table could not help but wax poetic about it during his cooking demonstration at Wallingford Farmers Market this past Wednesday.

Your Ballard Farmers Market is chock full of all sorts of goodness for  your kitchen, from meat, seafood, poultry, cheese, to all sorts of fruits and veggies, baked goods, sauces, confections, fresh-cut flowers and fresh milled flours, plants for the garden, wild mushrooms, and on and on. For a fuller accounting of what you’ll find at the Market today, go to “What’s Fresh Now!” in the upper right-hand corner.

Sunday, May 2nd: Fresh, Troll-Caught Washington Coastal SALMON! Woo-hoo!!!

May 1, 2010

Fresh, wild, Washington king salmon from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s b-a-c-k!!! Yep, Fresh, wild, troll-caught, Washington coastal (not to be confused with “postal”) king salmon is back at Wilson Fish. The season opened yesterday, May 1st, and Steve Wilson went and caught some right off the bat, in spite of the cranky weather on the coast. In fact, the boys at Wilson Fish will have fresh king salmon, halibut, true cod and rockfish today, but not a lot, and it will go fast. Some forget that second cup of coffee this a.m. You’d better be in line when the market opens!

Spring pea shoots from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You know, that salmon would be lovely with a nice side of sauteed pea shoots, eh? A little garlic, a little olive oil. Heaven. Colinwood Farms has a limited supply of pea shoots, so once you fight your way to your piece of salmon, run recklessly (well, not really) to Colinwood for your pea shoots.

Lemon grass starts from Billy's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Billy’s Organic Produce is back, though it will be a while before they have fresh tomatoes. In the meantime, they have lots of plants, including something you might not expect — lemon grass. It is plenty hard to find fresh lemon grass in stores, so why not just grow your own, eh?

Cayenne powder from Pipitone Farms. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I just love the fact that more and more dried local herbs and spices are becoming available from our market farmers, don’t you? And the farm that has truly blazed this trail is Pipitone Farms from Cashmere. Here is one of their latest additions: cayenne powder. You use it. Why not get it from a local farmer?

Culinary herb rub from Moosedreams Lavender Farm. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I had the pleasure of visiting Moosedreams Lavender Farm recently. Not only do they grow lavender on their tiny farm in the foothills of the Olympic Mountains, in Port Angeles, but they produce all manner of products from it, from soap to pet products to bath salts to culinary herb rub, above. I love this stuff on steak. An half hour before you throw your steak on the grill, pull it out of the fridge, slather it with olive oil, and coat it with this rub. Then let it sit and warm up while you built your fire in your Weber. Oh, yeah. That’s what I’m talkin’ about!

Chicken pies from Deborah's Homemade Pies. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Deborah’s Homemade Pies returns today to your Ballard Farmers Market. Deborah was off running a marathon — Boston, I think — but she’s back, and amen for that. Gotta get me one of them chicken pies and a slice of chocolate decadence.

Salted caramel brownie from Pasteria Lucchese. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I don’t know if these new brownies from Pasteria Lucchese will cure what ails you, but they certainly will cause you to care less about it. These salted caramel brownies are intensely delicious without being overpowering, and yet, like all of the amazing dessert creations Pasteria Lucchese has produced, a little goes a long way, meaning you can enjoy it in multiple sittings, unless if what ails you is a complete lack of willpower, in which case get two of these, as the first won’t even survive the trip home.

And remember, your Ballard Farmers Market is chock full of all sorts of goodness for  your kitchen, from meat, seafood, poultry, cheese, to all sorts of fruits and veggies, baked goods, sauces, confections, fresh-cut flowers and fresh milled flours, plants for the garden, wild mushrooms, and on and on. For a fuller accounting of what you’ll find at the Market today, go to “What’s Fresh Now!” in the upper right-hand corner.