Posts Tagged ‘pearl onions’

Sunday, August 11th: A Little Rain Makes For Happy Farmers & Even More Local Deliciousness!

August 10, 2013
Wild Black Elderberries from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wild Black Elderberries from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

For a couple of weeks each summer, Foraged & Found Edibles is able to harvest these wild black elderberries. They had some to offer last Sunday, and hopefully, they will have more today. Native to Eastern Washington, they can be made into wine, jellies, sauces. syrups, baked goods and more. They are loaded with vitamin C, are coated with a natural, wild yeast that makes them ideal for making wine and as a bread starter, and they are believed to have many medicinal qualities as well.

Saffron corms from Phocas Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Saffron corms from Phocas Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These are saffron corms from Phocas Farms. They are the bulb from which the saffron crocus grows. And when these crocus bloom, it is the bright red stigma that becomes the spice we all know as saffron. Surprisingly, saffron crocus grows well around here. Equally surprising is that August is a great time of year to plant their corms, because they spring to life and bloom in early fall when most other plants are going into hibernation. So, while it is next to impossible for you to get your hands on the dried saffron spice that Phocas Farms produces, because it is all pre-sold to local chefs, you can get some of their corms and try growing it yourself!

Sharon (left) & Gary McCool of Rosecrest Farm chatting with our own Gil Youenes in their on-farm shop. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sharon (left) & Gary McCool of Rosecrest Farm chatting with our own Gil Youenes in their on-farm shop. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

When we visited Rosecrest Farm in Chehalis, we learned some naturally cool things about how they make their amazing Swiss cheeses. The photo above was taken in their on-farm store, and that big, white door between Sharon and Gary McCool is the door to their aging room. That door is something like 16″ thick. Seriously. See, the room was originally built decades ago for aging beef, and it was designed to maintain a constant temperature without refrigeration. Amazing! And perfect for aging cheese, as it holds at 50 degrees or so year-round. That’s pretty cool, figuratively and literally.

Fennel bulb from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fennel bulb from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Check out these ginormous fennel bulbs from Alm Hill Gardens (a.k.a., Growing Washington). Fennel bulb is wonderful stuff. I add it raw to salads, grill it, cook it down into a nice, caramelized accent to pork, pickle it… the sky’s the limit. It has a mild licorice flavor and is slightly sweet. And it is great this time of year. Just be sure to clean it thoroughly, as bits of dirt get down inside it.

A smoked whole side of king salmon from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

A smoked whole side of king salmon from Wilson Fish. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wilson Fish is catching some of the largest wild king salmon of the season right now off the coast of Washington. And because these fish are getting ready to swim up Northwest rivers, like the Hoh and Frasier, to spawn until they die, they are loaded up with delicious fat. And that makes for incredible smoked king salmon. This is as moist and divine as any smoked salmon you will ever taste. But because they smoke it up fresh every week, they also sell out every week, so get here early!

Red pearl onions from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Red pearl onions from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I heart pearl onions from Boistfort Valley Farm. These tiny little alliums are only available fresh for a few weeks each summer — a very common theme in today’s post, eh? They may be available dried in the fall, but I like them best sautéed fresh with hericot vert beans (find them now from Growing Things Farm or Stoney Plains Organic Farm), and both are only available fresh this time of year. Peel the outer skin off of the pearl onions, and trim off the top and the root hairs, but keep the onions whole for cooking. I like to toss them with a good bacon — try the jowl bacon from Olsen Farms, which has a nice smoky sweetness to it. As the bacon browns, its fat renders out and caramelizes the onions beautifully. When the onions start to become translucent, and the bacon is mostly rendered out and beginning to brown, toss in the beans and sauté them all together until the beans are heated through but still have a nice crunch to them, which just takes a few minutes. Enjoy!

Shamrock apples from Tiny's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Shamrock apples from Tiny’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This time of year, as the early apples come into season, it is not uncommon to see different varieties of apples come and go every week. Between the different growing seasons throughout Washington and the hundreds of different varieties of apples grown here, apples are seemingly always coming into or going out of season. On the one hand, that means you need to pay attention, so that you can enjoy your favorites while they are in season. On the other hand, if you are more adventurous, you can experiment with new kinds of apples all the time! Like these Shamrock apples from Tiny’s Organic Produce, which are in season right now… for a little while, anyway.

Japanese Black Truffle tomatoes from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Japanese Black Truffle tomatoes from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This week’s gorgeous tomato of the week from our friends at One Leaf Farm is the Japanese Black Truffle tomato. This heirloom tomato traces its origins to Russian, where it is prized and fetches a high price. Its flesh is very dark, ergo its name. (Though you might ask, “then why is it called ‘Japanese’ if it’s from Russian?” Don’t have a good answer for you.) It is pear shaped, and it has a deep, rich flavor. It is just one of eight tomato varieties currently being harvested by One Leaf! (See a photo album of all their tomatoes on our Facebook page.)

Tomatillos from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Tomatillos from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Tomatillos! Hmm. Can you say salsa? Alvarez Organic Farms has everything — and I do mean everything — you will need for amazing salsas right now, from these tomatillos to tomatoes to garlic to onions to chile peppers to cucumbers! Heck, you can even toss in some of their watermelon!

Early Italian prunes from Magana Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Early Italian prunes from Magana Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Italian prunes have early and late varieties, meaning we see some in August, and then some more in October. And lucky us, as they are one of the finest stone fruits around! But don’t get hung up in the name “prune” like Californians did. They actually rebranded them as “plums” because they were worried that Americans associated the word “prune” with constipated old people. Europeans do not have this uptightness, and the Italians celebrate their beloved prunes. And while they will keep you regular, please do not be afraid to eat these delicious jewels because of their name. Eat them fresh, dried, in jams, jellies, sauces, chutneys, syrups, pies, tarts and more. Find them today from Magaña Farms.

Raspberry jam with thyme from Deluxe Foods. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Raspberry jam with thyme from Deluxe Foods. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Speaking of folks who can appreciate a fine prune, Deluxe Foods is back today with their wonderful lineup of jams, jellies, chutneys and sauces, though it is a little early yet for their prune varieties. See, they make their products with fresh, local, seasonal ingredients using heirloom recipes, and they sell them until, well, they run out. That means we’ll see prune flavors in a month or two, just in time for hearty fall dishes. For now, you can enjoy their berry flavors on your toast, like this Raspberry Jam with Thyme.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, September 30th: Hard Cider, Pearl Onions, Concord Grapes, Fresh Peanuts & One Adorable Child Eating Broccoli!

September 29, 2012

Hard ciders from Alpenfire Cider. Photo courtesy Alpenfire Cider.

It’s the last Sunday of the month, and that means Finnriver Cidery will let one of its fellow cider makers take over their spot at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Today’s special guest is Alpenfire Cider, from Port Townsend. Their cidery is nestled in the woods at the end of a street on the west side of PT, surrounded by orchards. They make great hard ciders with their own twist on them, and they also make amazing vinegars, too! Plus, they’re certified organic!

Prairie Spy apples from Booth Canyon Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Booth Canyon Orchards is located in the beautiful Methow Valley in Okanogan County. They grow amazing tree fruit — many wonderful heirloom varieties. Like these beautiful Prairie Spy apples. Stop by and learn all about their many amazing apples and pears, and take some home to try!

Fresh green peanuts from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Look, kids! It’s fresh peanut season at Alvarez Organic Farms! Take them home and boil them in a big pot of heavily salted water for a great Southern-style treat. Eat them freshly boiled, or drain them, let them dry a little, and then put them on a baking sheet in the oven for a while for fresh-roasted salted peanuts. Or for unsalted, you can just put them straight in the oven and roast them without boiling them.

Flavor Grenade pluots from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, there are so many kinds of pluots, and they come in so many sizes and colors, but one of the coolest looking pluots, and the one I think has the most macho name, is the Flavor Grenade pluot, like these, above, from Collins Family Orchards. And hey, just like their name suggests, they explode with flavor!

Pea vines from Gaia’s Natural Goods. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Here’s a little rebirth of spring for you! Gaia’s Natural Goods has a fresh crop of pea vines! I love these just sauteed with a little garlic in some olive oil, and imagine serving some local halibut from Wilson Fish, if you get here early enough to get any, or a nice grilled pork chop from Olsen Farms, over a bed of sauteed pea vines, eh? Yummers! They’ve also got carrotsberries and more today, too.

Concord grapes from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

There are lots of grapes coming through your Ballard Farmers Market now, ready for making jelly, wine, sauces, raisins or just eating fresh off the vine. These are Concord grapes from Lyall Farms. They grow on the slopes along the east side of the Columbia River in Mattawa. They’re sweet, juicy and delicious!

Tomatoes from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And how’s about early fall, farm-fresh tomatoes? Just look at these beauties from Alm Hill Gardens. Big ones. Little ones. Slicers, poachers. Sweeter ones, more acidic ones. And in all sorts of great colors to liven up your meal! Enjoy them right now. You will miss local, farm-fresh tomatoes come winter!

A dizzying variety of flower bulbs from Choice Bulb Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D Lyons.

It’s getting into bulb planting season again, and now’s a great time to stop by Choice Bulb Farms to check out the dozens of varieties of flower bulbs they have to offer. Remember, the bulbs you plant this fall will provide beautiful flowers next spring and summer!

Red Bartlett pears from Tiny’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is peak season for fall tree fruit at your Ballard Farmers Market, so revel in it.  Looks like a record year! Try out these red Bartlett pears from Tiny’s Organic Produce, for instance. And they’ve got lots of apples and pluots now, too!

Radicchio from Growing Things Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ah, radicchio! The stunningly beautiful, bitter chicory favored by Italians everywhere. Grill it. Add it to salads. Heck, top a sandwich with it. It’ll add color and a nice bite to many a dish. I love the stuff. Find these lovely heads of radicchio at Growing Things Farm.

Little Marina loves her some Oxbow Farm broccoli! Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

If there was ever a poster child for eating right, I think little Marina here would be it. Her mom had just purchased this lovely head of broccoli from Oxbow Farm last week, and Marina just had to hold it for mom. Mom soon found out why, as Marina began devouring it on the spot. I loved it when mom calmly asked Marina, “Please don’t eat all of it before we get home. We won’t have any for dinner.”

Red pearl onions from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Let’s finish this week’s epistle with one of my favorite things — pearl onions. These little jewels are very hard to grow, so not many farms around here grow them. And yet, they are so amazing caramelized whole with some Sea Breeze bacon and then tossed with some hericot vert beans from Stoney Plains Organic Farm — a true treat! Well, lucky us, Boistfort Valley Farm has some of these cured red pearl onions right now! But they won’t last long!

Finally, another reminder to please bring your own bags today, and every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, July 24th: Sweet Corn & Spinach Together In July! Oh, the Wonders of the Non-Summer of 2011!

July 24, 2011

Sweet corn from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, just when I was about to give up on corn altogether this summer, along comes Alvarez Organic Farms with the first sweet corn of the season. And if that doesn’t give you hope, or at least something to keep living for, they have also begun harvesting watermelons and pickling cukes. Excited? Me, too! So, while you are excited, we would like you to take a moment right now, even before you head to your Ballard Farmers Market, to please remember to vote for your Ballard Farmers Market in the 2011 America’s Favorite Farmers Market Contest! And thank you.

Spinach from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You know, in as much as the appearance of sweet corn this summer is a pleasant surprise, whereas any other year it would have be expected, another pleasant surprise, and a side benefit of our ridiculous weather, is that Boistfort Valley Farm still has spinach! Lots of it, in fact. Their radishes are about done, but hey, they should’ve been done over a month ago. And they’ve got some romaine lettuce that is the size of a small child! Go figure. And enjoy!

Blackberries from Hayton Berry Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Look, another crop of summer… finally. Blackberries are in at Hayton Berry Farms. I’m not even sure if the invasive, feral ones in the parks are even blooming yet. But the really good ones are here, now. So start making jams and pies, people!

Magda summer squash from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Magda summer squash from Alm Hill Gardens. This has long been my favorite summer squash. But this year, it just seems a little bit sweeter yet. Particularly these puppies, grown up in Whatcom County, in what is arguably the coldest part of the state right now, in the coldest summer ever. But hey, I’m a glass-is-half-full kinda guy. If a cold summer means I have to suffer with the best summer squash ever, so be it!

Blueberries from Sidhu Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ah, blueberries from Sidhu Farms. Now we’re talkin’. The rest of the country is sweltering. Their crops are withered or flooded out. So it’s a little chilly and damp around here. We have blueberries!

White pearl onions from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pearl onions from Full Circle Farm. Bacon from Skagit River Ranch. Green Beans from Alvarez Organic Farms. A match made in heaven. Fresh pearl onions have a very short season, and very few people grow them. You probably thought they only came in a can, didn’t you? Enjoy them now, while you can!

Vans cherries from Bill's Fruits. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Vans cherries, like these from Bill’s Fruits, are one of my favorite cherries. They have a deep, dark, delicious flavor. They don’t get all the hype of bings and Rainiers, but I’d choose them over those two any day of the week. Haven’t tried vans? What are you waiting for?!?

Yellow brandywine tomatoes from Billy's Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Billy’s Gardens is really hitting its stride now with heirloom tomatoes, like these yellow brandywine tomatoes. With their amazing selection of varieties, in every shape, size and color, you’ll find the perfect tomato for flavor, application and acidity just for you. Of course, that means lots of quality control testing. You’d better by some of each!

Romanesco from Growing Things Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey look, kids! Romanesco from Growing Things Farm. It’s the only vegetable that grows in fractals! Pretty cool, huh? Just check out those tight spirals. Of course, romanesco is not just another pretty face. A cousin of cauliflower, it can be used similarly. Sometimes, I just steam it and top it with fresh-grated parmesan. Or you can roast it in the oven, or even pan roast it with pancetta and bread crumbs.

Red Haven peaches from Pipitone Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

When you approach Pipitone Farms today to get yourself some of these red haven peaches, don’t go fondling them. They are carefully put into these protective trays for a reason. See, Jerry Pipitone picks them at the peak of ripeness, and then he puts them into these trays. Those are the only two times these peaches are touched before you get them. Perfectly ripe and juicy and sweet, and no bruises!

Squash blossoms from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Here’s a thought. How about we take some of these spectacular squash blossoms from Stoney Plains Organic Farm, and we stuff them with some fresh goat chevre from Silver Springs Creamery? Then we can pan-fry them. Nuff said.

Shortcake from Grateful Bread Bakery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And let us finish off this week with these lovely little shortcakes from Grateful Bread Bakery. They are the perfect vehicle for all those berries you are getting every week. Again, nuff said.

There is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now. And please remember to vote for your Ballard Farmers Market in the 2011 America’s Favorite Farmers Market Contest!

August 9th: Tomatoes, Melons, Celery, Plums, Eggplant, Apples… Everything!

August 9, 2009
Many heirloom tomatoes from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Many heirloom tomatoes from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The Ballard Farmers Market is full of incredible tomatoes today, like these from Oxbow Farm. From heirlooms to cherries to beef steaks, in every shape, size and color, we have reached peak tomato season. And this is a bumper season for tomatoes. With our hot weather recently, tomato plants have gone into overdrive. Come to the market and enjoy them while you can.

Honey Yellow icebox melons from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Honey Yellow icebox melons from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The Market is awash in melons now, too, including a wide variety of icebox melons like these honey yellow melons from Full Circle Farm. Icebox melons are small varieties of melons, many of which were researched and developed right here in Washington by WSU.

Collard greens from Nash's. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Collard greens from Nash's. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

With the extreme heat recently, many farms saw certain crops overwhelmed. Greens in particular suffered. But the beauty of the geographic diversity of the many farms at Ballard Farmers Market is that most crops are still available from at least one or more farms. Take these collard greens, for instance. While many farms currently do not have them, Nash’s does. So take time to look around the Market today to find what you want, and consider trying something new, if you can’t find what you had hoped for, like radishes, which will be in very tight supply today.

Celery from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Celery from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Boistfort Valley Farm has the first celery of the year at the Market. Strangely enough, celery is one of those crops not grown by many market farmers, and yet it ends up in so many of our fridges. Well, I am here to tell you, if you have never had super-fresh celery straight from the farmer, as opposed to that old, well-travelled, rubbery stuff at the big box store, you must try some. The snap. The taste. You can’t beat it.

Shiro plums from ACMA Orchards. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Shiro plums from ACMA Orchards. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Everywhere you turn today, you will find stone fruit, from peaches to cherries to nectarines to pluots. You’ll see apricots, cherry plums, and these lovely Japanese Shiro plums from ACMA, above.

Spud nuts from Olsen Farms come in three convenient sizes. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Spud nuts from Olsen Farms come in three convenient sizes. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Potatoes are hitting their stride now, and it is cool enough for us to cook them now, too. Olsen Farms is famous for its dryland potatoes from Northeast Washington, and for their spud nuts in particular, like these above.

Some many peppers from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Some many peppers from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Alvarez Organic Farms grows something like 150 varieties of peppers. Above is just a sampling of them available now. Look for more and more in the next few weeks, in every shape, color and heat index.

Purple Rain eggplant from Alvarez. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Purple Rain eggplant from Alvarez. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Alvarez also grows some 15 varieties of eggplant, like this Purple Rain eggplant, above. You’ll find 10 varieties of eggplant today from Alvarez, and eggplant is now available from many other farms, too.

Pickling cukes from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pickling cukes from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is pickling season. Many farms grow pickling cukes. Stoney Plains grows some of the best. And you can order them in 25# bags, sorted by size, in order to make your pickling process easier. And Alm Hill, as well as several of the Hmong farms, has pickling dill available now, too.

Stoney Plains has the first westside corn of the year. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Stoney Plains has the first westside corn of the year. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Stoney Plains also has the first sweet corn of the season from Western Washington available now. Westside farmers often plant different varieties of corn than Eastside farms, so check some out and compare.

Organic artichokes from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Organic artichokes from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Alm Hill has artichokes and tomatillos now, and it may have cranberry shelling beans and okra this week. Ever-bearing strawberries are beginning to reappear in the Market now, from Billy’s to possibly Sidhu and Alm Hill. If you can’t find them this week, you will next. And many varieties of green beans — from concesa to dragon tongue to Roma to yellow wax — and you will find lots of them at Local Roots, Growing Things, Stoney Plains, Summer Run, Boistfort Valley, and many others.

Red pearl onions from Full Circle. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Red pearl onions from Full Circle. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. Too few farms grow pearl onions. But Full Circle is one of them. These little onion jewels are a short-season summer treat. I like to sauté them with bacon and green beans. Yeah, baby!

Shamrock apples, from Tiny's, are one of the first apples of the season. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Shamrock apples, from Tiny's, are one of the first apples of the season. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Two signs summer is not long for this world: back-to-school sales and fresh apples. Tiny’s has Shamrock apples, above, an early apple. ACMA has another early variety called Lodi apples.

Of course, this is just a teaser of all the deliciousness available today at the Ballard Farmers Market. For a full list of what you can hope to find today, click on “What’s Fresh Now!” in the upper right-hand corner.