Posts Tagged ‘pumpkins’

Sunday, September 29th: Happy Fall! (In Case You Hadn’t Noticed.)

September 28, 2013
Dolgo crabapples from Jerzy Boyz. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Dolgo crabapples from Jerzy Boyz. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The hail storms that devastated much of Booth Canyon Orchard’s 2013 crop, of which I wrote last week, also hit Jerzy Boyz hard. That is why they are only coming every other week this fall, as their supply of heirloom tree fruit is greatly diminished. The good news is, this is one of those weeks! And with any luck, they will still have some of these heirloom Dolgo crabapples for us. Think pies, jams, even wine. Few farms grow them around here, and those that do tend to use them as a pollinator. But they are a special little apple, so enjoy them while you can!

Sweet corn from Gaia's Harmony Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sweet corn from Gaia’s Harmony Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It may be the last Sunday in September, and the winds may already be howling, but we are still seeing the arrival of new harvests of sweet corn! This lovely corn is from Gaia’s Harmony Farm up in Snohomish. In the immortal words of Garrison Keillor, “Sex is good, but not as good as fresh sweet corn.” So enjoy it while you can!

Wines from Kitzke Cellars. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wines from Kitzke Cellars. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is tasting day at Kitzke Cellars from Richland, Washington. Stop by to sample their award-winning lineup of wines, including their double gold medal winning 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon, on the right above.

Blackberries from Hayton Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Blackberries from Hayton Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Though most fresh berries have taken their leave of us already this fall, you will still find these lovely blackberries in abundance from Hayton Farms today at your Ballard Farmers Market. So grab a flat or three today, as soon, you won’t be seeing them again for many months!

Red radishes from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Red radishes from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I heart farm-fresh, local radishes, and I, for one, will miss them over the winter. See, they just don’t like the cold all that much. Radishes may be making a resurgence now, but you likely won’t see radishes for several months once winter hits. Therefore, you should revel in them now! These beauties are from Stoney Plains Organic Farm, and they are delish!

Bratwurst from Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bratwurst from Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Have you tried the newest addition to the coolers at Skagit River Ranch? It is bratwurst, made from their delicious pigs, and because I care so much about you all, I did some careful quality control testing on a package of these this past week, and they are spectabulous! Grab a jar of your favorite mustard and some caraway sauerkraut from Firefly Kitchens, and you are good to go, people! You can thank me later.

Flavor Grenade Pluots from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Flavor Grenade Pluots from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

How’s about some late-season pluots from Collins Family Orchards in the form of these colorful and, as the name suggests, exploding with deliciousness, Flavor Grenade pluots?

Winter Luxury pumpkins from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Winter Luxury pumpkins from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

If like our weather, you are charging headlong into fall, you can’t do it any better than with these so aptly named Winter Luxury pumpkins from One Leaf Farm. In as much as they are stunningly beautiful, they are even more delicious. This is a great pie pumpkin, or simply use it as you would any winter squash. They have a gorgeous texture and a lovely sweetness and flavor that may have you wondering why you ever bothering with any other pumpkins.

Wild porcini mushrooms from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wild porcini mushrooms from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wild mushrooms are loving our fall, so far. Stop by Foraged & Found Edibles today for some yellow or white chanterelle mushrooms, some hedgehog mushroomslobster mushrooms or these gorgeous porcini mushrooms.

D.H. Hale peaches from Martin Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

D.H. Hale peaches from Martin Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These D H Hale peaches from Martin Family Orchards are a lovely, late-season peach. They are big, beautiful, sweet and juicy — one last big blast of summer. Few things can top a farm-fresh Washington peach, so enjoy them one last time this season!

Delicata winter squash from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Delicata winter squash from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

As all the winter squash begins pouring into the Market this time of year, I often think, “it’s still a bit too warm to fire up the oven and roast squash.” Well, not this week! So dive headlong into the sea of squashliciousness. I recommend starting with some of this delicata squash from Alm Hill Gardens (a.k.a., Growing Washington). It is sweet, with a gorgeous texture. It roasts nicely in just 20-30 minutes. And you can even eat the skin! I like to simply cut it in half length-wise, scoop out the seeds, slather it will olive oil, and roast it face-down in a baking dish until tender, though you can also slice it thin and sauté it. And don’t throw those seeds in the composts! Oil them up, salt them, and roast them, too, for a lovely, crunchy snack.

Sesame loaf (left) and whole grain sandwich bread from d:floured gluten-free bakery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sesame loaf (left) and whole grain sandwich bread from d:floured gluten-free bakery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Grab a loaf of this gluten-free sandwich bread from nuflours gluten-free bakery today, or any of their other goodies.  Their entire lineup is irresistible, whether you require gluten-free products or not. From cookies to artisan loaves to sweet breads to brownies, it’s all good!

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Saturday, October 28th: A Tribute To Essential Fall Crops!

October 27, 2012

Winter Luxury pumpkins from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey, kids. It’s pumpkin pie season. And you can’t get much better for pie making than these Winter Luxury pumpkins from One Leaf Farm. They are not only beautiful, they are delicious! Indeed, they are aptly named. Stop by One Leaf for a couple of these cool looking gourds, and perhaps some lovely radicchio, too.

Sweet potatoes from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nothing like sweet potatoes fresh out of the oven on a cool, fall night. They fill you with warmth while stoking your energy and pleasing your palate. And while they are a perfect side dish to so many proteins, try adding them to a simple or downright busy root roast. I love cutting them up and roasting them with parsnips, or with beets, carrots, parsnips and sunchokes. Or you can mash them with garlic, some chipotles in adobo sauce, and a touch of maple syrup. Yeah, baby. These Beauregard (left) and O’Henry sweet potatoes (above) are from Lyall Farms.

Golden Nugget squash from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These Golden Nugget winter squash from Stoney Plains Organic Farm have a sweet flesh with a wonderfully smooth texture that’ll just make you purr. And isn’t that what you want from fall foods? It’s cold. It’s wet. It’s dark. Give us comfort food! This is comfort food.

Yellow storage onions from Nature’s Last Stand. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

What doesn’t call for onions in the recipe this time of year. And while the onslaught of October rains may quickly be making our record warm and dry stretch this summer a distant memory, the truth is that that weather made for an epic onion harvest. They loved the sun, and then they were able to dry and cure without getting wet and moldy. That means we’ve got more storage onions, like these yellow onions from Nature’s Last Stand, than we’ve had in years at your Ballard Farmers Market. Enjoy!

Celery from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This also seems to be a stellar year for celery, too. It is bigger, crunchier, even sweeter than in years past. And again, every recipe seems to call for it, from roasts to soups to stuffings. Nash’s Organic Produce has some lovely celery right now at your Ballard Farmers Market.

Viking purple potatoes from Olsen Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These Viking Purple potatoes from Olsen Farms are one of my favorites, and not just because they are gorgeous and have a really cool, Ballard-friendly kind of name. They have this amazingly fluffy, snow-white flesh when they are steamed that just begs for a big dollop of your favorite butter. Mmm.

Shallots from Summer Run Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Shallots also find their way into many a fall recipe. One of my faves is to caramelize them in the same pan with some nice chunky bacon, then toss in some Brussels sprouts, and cook them until they just start to get tender. Then deglaze the pan with some white wine, which will finish cooking the sprouts while it reduces. The shallots above are from Summer Run Farm.

Purple Goddess pears from Jerzy Boyz. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fall is an excellent time to enjoy pears, like these Purple Goddess pears from Jerzy Boyz. So great in salads, baked, in pies and tarts, or just on their own, eaten right off the core. Right now, there is a great selection of pears at your Ballard Farmers Market, so do enjoy them while you can!

Carrots from Gaia’s Natural Goods. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Let us not forget the formidable carrot, whose own ubiquitous presence can be found on almost any fall recipe page. Carrots are sweeter this time of year, due to cooler whether, making them great for any application, or just plain munching on their own. The lovely specimens (above) are from Gaia’s Natural Goods.

Spanish red garlic from Jarvis Family Garlic Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And perhaps no ingredient from your Ballard Farmers Market is more called for in your fall cooking than garlic, and lucky for us, Jarvis Family Garlic Farm from out of Sequim joined us this year with a bunch of amazing heirloom varieties of garlic for you to enjoy. After all. there is no such thing as too much garlic!

Fresh cranberries from Bloom Creek Cranberry Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Let’s finish off this week’s installment with one of the most quintessentially fall crops — cranberries. Bloom Creek Cranberry Farm returned last week with their gorgeous cranberries, so there’s no excuse for you not to bring fresh cranberry sauce with you to grandma’s house on Thanksgiving, is there?

Finally, another reminder to please bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, October 14th: Hardy Kiwis, Carving Pumpkins, Holiday Hams, Celery Root, Cheesecake & More!

October 13, 2012

Hardy kiwis from Greenwater Farm. Photo courtesy Greenwater Farm.

The rains have returned, and frankly… yippee! Don’t get me wrong. I, too, enjoyed having a summer that, well, was a summer. But I wouldn’t live here if I didn’t like rain. And after 81 days without it, it is quite refreshing. The air smells cleaner. The dust is washing off of, well, everything. And I can hear each and every blade of grass cheering. Imagine how our beloved farmers are feeling! So, it really is October. Most farms have already felt a nip of frost by now, and your Ballard Farmers Market is awash in fall crops. Today, we celebrate the arrival of a particularly special Northwest fall crop, the hardy kiwi. These tiny jewels of sweet deliciousness are indeed kiwis, but they have evolved so that they thrive in a cool, temperate climate like we have here in Western Washington. Greenwater Farm grows them in Port Townsend, and they’ll only have them available for a few short weeks. If you’ve never tried them, avail yourself of this opportunity!

Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Halloween is fast approaching, and it is high time to get that perfect pumpkin and carve it. Grab one of these lovely Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins today from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Cut the top out. Scoop, wash and roast the seeds, and carve it up with some menacing looking face. Just be sure to let your kids pick out a pumpkin, too!

A holiday ham from Skagit River Ranch. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Have you ordered your holiday turkeys and hams yet? It’s not too early. Heck, it’s already October 14th! Thanksgiving is less than five weeks away. Seriously. It’s early this year — November 22nd. Swing by Skagit River Ranch today and place your order, so you’ll been sure to have a delicious, humanly-raised, local centerpiece for your Thanksgiving feast.

Celery root, a.k.a., celeriac, from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is by no means the most handsome of fall vegetables, but celery root, or celeriac, is an essential ingredient to many fall dishes. From soups to roasts to amazing mashes — think celery root, parsnips and potatoes! — you’ll need it. In fact, many have been asking about it for weeks. Well, One Leaf Farm, which returned to your Ballard Farmers Market just last Sunday, wins this year’s celery root sweepstakes, being the first farm to roll in with it this year. Woohoo!

Farm-fresh honey from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

We’ve been a little short on honey this past year at your Ballard Farmers Market, so we’ve allowed some of our farmers to bring in honey produced on their farms for sale. This honey, from Boistfort Valley Farm, is made by their resident bees that also pollinate all their crops on the farm.

Kale and collard greens from Gaia’s Natural Goods. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Gaia’s Natural Goods returns today to your Ballard Farmers Market will lots of tasty greens, like the above kale and collard greens. See, with a little nip of frost in the air recently, greens have gotten a lot sweeter, making this a great time of year to enjoy them. Plus, cooking them helps warm up your kitchen and takes the nip out of your house.

Bosc pears from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bosc pears from Collins Family Orchards are in their prime right now. Sweet, juicy, and wonderful to eat, they make for a great addition to junior’s lunchbox, a salad, or a snack at the office during your afternoon break. Enjoy this fall treat while you can!

A colorful fall display at Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Just had to share this photo of the display at Nash’s Organic Produce last week. It comes under the heading of “spectacular displays.” Oh, the fall colors of goldenchiogga and Detroit beetsturnipscelery and arugula. Comforting veggies for cool fall days!

Daikon radishes from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And how’s about some daikon radishes from Colinwood Farms? They have a bright, clean, mild flavor, with just the slightest hint of spiciness. Add them to salads like any radish, shred them as a garnish or to use with sashimi, sauté them. These Asian delights are deliciously versatile!

Cheesecake from Pasteria Lucchese. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

While you are ordering your holiday turkeys, roasts and hams, don’t forget about dessert! From sweet breads to pies to one of these amazing cheesecakes from Pasteria Lucchese, check in with your favorite Ballard Farmers Market dessert makers now to learn about what you’ll need to do to ensure you’ll bring the best dessert with you to whatever holiday festivities.

Finally, another reminder to please bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, November 20th: Eat Local For Thanksgiving with Chef Dustin Ronspies of Art of the Table!

November 20, 2011

Chef Dustin Ronspies of Art of the Table performing a cooking demonstration at Wallingford Farmers Market this past June. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This is where the rubber meets the road, folks. If there is any time to eat local, it’s Thanksgiving. After all, what’s the point of giving thanks for the bounty on our tables if we do not know who to actually give thanks to? Well, when you Eat Local For Thanksgiving, you’ll know the names of each of the farms that produced the ingredients that went into your Thanksgiving feast, and that means you can thank each and every one of them by name as you give thanks over your meal. How cool is that? And to help us with great ideas for Thanksgiving side dishes is Chef Dustin Ronspies of Art of the Table, who will be performing a cooking demonstration today at noon at your Ballard Farmers Market. Dustin has built his entire business around using what’s fresh and local at your Ballard Farmers Market every week as the basis for his weekly menus, so if anyone can talk Eat Local For Thanksgiving, it’s him!

Winter squash from Growing Things Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, it’s time to go down the Thanksgiving grocery check list. And you might as well bring that entire list to your Ballard Farmers Market today. I mean, if for some reason you can’t find it here, you’ll still have four days to get it at the coop or Ballard Market, right? Let’s start with an absolute staple: winter squash. Just look at these beauties from Growing Things Farm. You know, like with so many crops, 2011 was not a good year for winter squash harvests, but the ones our farmers did harvest are awesome, and the Market is flush with them today, so celebrate ’em while you can!

Fresh sausages from Sea Breeze Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

If you are looking at this photo thinking, “What the heck do sausages have to do with Thanksgiving dinner?”, then you need to broaden your horizons a bit! These beautiful, farmstead sausages from Sea Breeze Farm are perfect to mix in with your stuffing, or to toss in with your mashed potatoes or sweet potatoes. Their savory, spicy, fattiness adds complex flavors to all sorts of dishes. So don’t think of them as a main course. Think of them as a seasoning!

Brooke Lucy from Bluebird Grain Farms. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Looking for flour to bake with, or to thicken that gravy? Or maybe you’d like to add a nice pilaf as a side dish. I imagine you have all manner of uses for the whole grains, cracked grains, flours and mixes offered by Bluebird Grain Farms. Well, Brooke Lucy returns today with your direct connection to your local grain grower. Everything else on your holiday table will be local. Shouldn’t your grain products be local, too? Not to mention fresh and delicious!

Granny Smith apples from ACMA Mission Orchards. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Granny Smith apples from ACMA Mission Orchards make for great pies and sauces, and they’ve got a gorgeous fresh crop of them, and many other varieties of apples and pears, right now. And hey, don’t just think desserts and sauces. Think stuffing, or roasting with squash and more. Few meals are more wonderful than Thanksgiving dinner for  celebrating the bounty of this year’s local harvest of magnificent deliciousness. So pull out all the stops!

Sweet potatoes from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Beauregard sweet potatoes from Lyall Farms are another must for your Thanksgiving table. You can roast them whole, or cut them up. You can bake them in a casserole. You can mix them in with your mashed potatoes. You can even try them with a recipe I learned from some of the Mexican farmhands at Full Circle Farm years ago — cube them, steam them until just tender, and then mash them with some canned chipotle peppers in adobo sauce and a little maple syrup. Yeah, baby!

Fresh, local jersey cow milk from Silver Springs Creamery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, just how many dishes will require fresh milk this week? You’ll need them for your mashed potatoes, of course. And for that chocolate cream pie. So let’s be thankful for Silver Springs Creamery for producing for us some of the most incredible, local jersey milk and goat milk you will find anywhere. Support your local dairy while enriching your meal.

Brussels sprouts from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ah, the mighty Brussels sprout from Boistfort Valley Farm. It is peak season for them now. If you love them, you don’t need me to sell you on them. But if you are one of those phobic types, then you clearly have never had them prepared properly. They are amazing oven roasted, but I love them sautéed with pancetta, shallots and a little white wine at the end to deglaze the pan and give them a little steam. You pork-phobic types can leave out the pancetta, I s’pose, if you must. Otherwise, sweat the chopped shallots while you render the fat out of the pancetta, and when they’re both going good, add your halved and quartered sprouts. When they start to get bright green and a bit tender, hit the pan with some white wine for a few minutes, until nicely tender. Just don’t overcook them. That’s why most folks don’t like them. They’ve always had them overcooked.

Viking purple potatoes from Olsen Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

As for those aforementioned mashed potatoes, Olsen Farms has an amazing selection of the finest potatoes you will ever want. For mashing, I am a particular fan of these Viking purple potatoes, with their creamy, white flash that is pretty much put on this earth as a vehicle for butter. But you might be a German butterball fan. Who am I to judge?

Sugar pie pumpkins from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pumpkin pie is a staple of many a Thanksgiving feast, but too many people use that nasty canned stuff. But why, when Stoney Plains has these gorgeous sugar pie pumpkins just waiting for you? These babies are bred specifically for your pie-making pleasure. Please, do not deny them their destiny!

Artisan breads from Grateful Bread Baking. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You might be thinking, “With all the food we’ll have on our table this Thursday, do we really need bread, too?” Uh… yes!!! I mean, you are gonna take it home tonight, cube it up or tear it apart, toss it with olive oil and herbs and spices and roast it in the oven at low heat to dry it out, and then, on Thursday, you are going to make the most amazing stuffing with it. Woohoo! So stop by Grateful Bread Baking for just the right loaf, or three.

Schmaltz, a.k.a., chicken fat, from Stokesberry Sustainable Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And the secret ingredient is schmaltz, or chicken fat. Use it in just about everything. From your mashed potatoes to your baked goods to a rub-down for your turkey, and on and on. Stokesberry Sustainable Farm produces this from their chickens. And they’ve also got plenty of turkey sausage right now. Work some of that into your stuffing, too, eh?

Quince jelly from Deluxe Foods. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You’ll be needing some incredible, heirloom jams and jellies to accompanying many of your dishes, and for that, Deluxe Foods has you covered. Hopefully, they’ve have some of this quintessentially Thanksgiving-esque quince jelly today, though you might have to get here early to get any. But hey, if not, they’ve go many more great flavors.

Parsnips from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Parsnips from Nash’s Organic Produce are great added to a root roast, stew or soup, but for Thanksgiving, I recommend blending some in with your mashed potatoes. Oh, sweet, creamy deliciousness!

Rutabagas from Colinwood Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Let us finish today’s Eat Local For Thanksgiving epistle with the mighty rutabaga from Colinwood Farm. These, too, can be mashed in with your potatoes, but me, I like ’em steamed and mashed with lotsa butter all on their own. For my money, it just ain’t Thanks For The Land Day without a healthy helping of bagas.

Hey, there is plenty of local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.