Posts Tagged ‘romanesco’

Sunday, March 8th: Just A Few Of My Favorite Product Photos & My Farewell!

March 7, 2015
A heart-shaped tomato from Around The Table Farm at Wallingford Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

A heart-shaped tomato from Around The Table Farm at Wallingford Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

I have been fortunate to have had the opportunity to combine my three passions into one gig over the last eight years. I managed to find a job in which I got to help develop our local food system while at the same time writing about it and photographing it. What a blessing! I have been working with farmers markets since 1991, and I have served on the board of Seattle Chefs Collaborative since 1999. I also served as executive director of Washington State Farmers Market Association from 1999-2005, and in 2006, I co-authored the Washington State Farmers Market Manual for Washington State University. I have loved all this work, and I am proud of all we’ve accomplish here, leading the nation in local food. So even though I am leaving my farmers market job after today, I will still be around.

For this last official regular blog post for your Ballard Farmers Market, I’d like to revisit with you some of my favorite photos from over the years. Like the one above, taken at Wallingford Farmers Market last summer. This naturally-occuring heart-shaped tomato was grown by Poulsbo’s Around The Table Farm. Yet one more reason to love vine-ripened, farm-fresh tomatoes over homogenous, boring tomatoes from the Big Box stores, if you really needed another reason.

An explosion of carrots from Gaia's Natural Goods. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

An explosion of carrots from Gaia’s Natural Goods. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

While the previous photo was copied all over the intertubes, it is this photo that actually circled the globe. Yes, this is my single-most plagerized photo ever, and I say that with pride (and a little bit of annoyance — please don’t republish photos without permission or giving credit!). I took this photo of baby rainbow carrots that look like an exploding firework not long before Independence Day in 2012. These carrots were grown by Gaia’s Harmony Farm in Snohomish. I published this photo across all of our markets’ blogs and Facebook pages for the 4th that year, and it just spread across the interwebs from there. Imagine how far it would have travelled had a vision of the Virgin Mother be visible in it?

Fresh sausages from Sea Breeze Farmat Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh sausages from Sea Breeze Farmat Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

I’ve taken a lot of nice photos of Sea Breeze Farm’s meats over the years, but I’ve always liked this one of their sausages best. The sausages are all uniform in size and stacked perfectly, highlighted by the wooden butcher block below them. But what sets them off is that they are three such distinctly different colors. Kinda makes you want some right now, doesn’t it? And that is what makes this photo so special.

Rutabagas from Boistfort Valley Farm at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Rutabagas from Boistfort Valley Farm at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Rutabagas are one of my favorite vegetables. I must owe that to my Irish heritage. My family eats them every Thanksgiving. Indeed, it wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without them. Then my Aunt Joyce taught me to add them to the corned beef pot on St. Paddy’s Day. (You need to add them 15-30 minutes before your potatoes, as they’re much denser.) They absorb all the flavors of the spices and meat. Nummers. I’ve also always found rutabagas to be quite beautiful, with their deep yellows and purples. And of all my lovely photos of rutabagas — indeed, of all the thousands of images I’ve taken of markets over the years — this one of rutabagas from Boistfort Valley Farm, spread out randomly in a wooden farm box, is one of my absolute favorites.

Framed cabbage from Full Circle Farm at Wallingford Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Framed cabbage from Full Circle Farm at Wallingford Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

This wonderful photo of symmetrically-arranged cabbages in a wooden box was taken back in 2010. They are from one of the gorgeous displays that Big Dave used to erect for Full Circle Farm at Wallingford Farmers Market. The image quality suffers a bit from my old camera’s inferior technology, but the image is still nice, don’t you think?

Chicories from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chicories from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

One Leaf Farm is known for growing lots of deliciously bitter members of the chicory family. They are quite beautiful, too, and in 2012, I managed to capture this image of escarole, treviso radicchio and Palla Rosa radicchio here at your Ballard Farmers Market. This image is now used on One Leaf’s own website, which pleases me every time I visit it.

Romanesco from Full Circle Farm at Madrona Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Romanesco from Full Circle Farm at Madrona Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Another of the most stunning vegetables — one that magically grows in perfect fractals — is this romanesco, a member of the cauliflower family. And my favorite photo is of this romanesco from Full Circle Farm at Madrona Farmers Market back in 2011. This photos has served as the cover photo for Madrona’s Facebook page ever since.

Chinese spinach from Children's Garden. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chinese spinach from Children’s Garden. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

But for my money, the most beautiful vegetable of all is this Chinese spinach. With its purple and green leaves, it is just flat-out stunning. Only two farms bring it to your Ballard Farmers Market each summer: Mee Garden and Children’s Garden. This image is of some from Children’s Garden from 2011. And in fact, before I published this photo and waxed poetic about the virtues of this gorgeous leafy green, these two farms were hard-pressed to sell any of it. Now, they can’t harvest enough of it. And for that, I love you, good people of Ballard Farmers Market! You are willing to be adventurous in the name of eating local!

Broccoli in the field at Alm Hill Gardens. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Broccoli in the field at Alm Hill Gardens. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Most people probably don’t even think about what broccoli looks like growing in the fieldThis is what it looks like! That’s the developing floret right there in the center surrounded by all those lovely, and edible, mind you, leaves. That’s why I’ve always loved this photo from Growing Washington in Everson — it surprises people. No, milk doesn’t just magically come in a carton, and yes, broccoli does have leaves!

Winter squash from Summer Run Farm at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Winter squash from Summer Run Farm at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright Zachary D. Lyons.

Winter squash is also very photogenic. And this photo of delicata and carnival squash from Summer Run Farm taken just this past fall happens to be my favorite. The colors are simply explosive, aren’t they? No wonder so many restaurants will use their squash as decorations around the dining room for weeks before cooking them!

Cauliflower in every color from Growing Things Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cauliflower in every color from Growing Things Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Did you know that cauliflower comes in so many colors? Just it this photo you’ll see purple, yellow, green, white and green romanesco from Growing Things Farm. Seriously, aren’t farmers markets so much more fun in every way than a boring Big Box store, where you’ll only get white cauliflower, and it won’t be remotely as sweet as this stuff is?

Viking purple potatoes from Olsen Farms at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Viking purple potatoes from Olsen Farms at Ballard Farmers Market. Copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Finally… and this is the big finally… in honor of Ballard’s Scandinavian roots, and because this photos has actually been republished in national print magazines, let’s finish off my celebration of my favorite product photos, and my role as Blog Master, with these Viking purple potatoes from Olsen Farms. Their magnificent purple skin belies snow white flesh that makes them a perfect masher.

Thank you for joining me week in and week out for all these years, as I have brought you the news of the day as to what’s fresh now at your Ballard Farmers Market, with a sprinkling of snark and commentary. If at times my tone has seemed revolutionary, that is because the revolution starts here, on your fork. Know that I won’t be too far away, and that you’ll likely still see me around the Market on Sundays. Hopefully, I’ll contribute the odd guest post in the future. And now that I have the time, I’ll be whipping my personal blogs into shape with tales of food and adventure from near and far. You can find my blogs via mayoroffoodtown.com, though give me a couple of weeks to spit-polish them a bit, as they’re a bit tarnished from years of neglect. (If you have need for a skilled writer, photographer or event organizer, contact me through that site.) And I won’t turn down hugs today, either. (Unless you’re sick. Just got over norovirus, and that stuff is just plain nasty.)

xoxo Zach

Advertisements

Sunday, September 22nd: Chile Peppers, Concord Squash, Cheddar Cauliflower, Red Kuri Squash & More!

September 21, 2013
Goathorn chile peppers from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Goathorn chile peppers from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Well, how ’bout them… well… insert any name of a local sports team except the Mariners, am I right? (Okay, gratuitous pandering to Seattle’s rabid sports fans. Check.) Above is a variety of goathorn chile peppers from Alvarez Organic Farms. They are a medium hot chile with a wonderful, bright flavor. Well, it is full-on pepper season at Alvarez. They grow over 200 varieties, and this is a prolific year for peppers, like for so many other crops. This time of year, the pepper fields are so colorful at Alvarez, they are kind of reminiscent of the tulip fields in Skagit Valley in April. You can get a pretty good idea of their many varieties of peppers by checking out our Facebook photo album of them!

Concord grapes from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Concord grapes from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey, kids! It’s Concord grapes from our friends at Lyall Farms! Concord grapes make the best juice, and even better grape jelly. They have a deep, bold, natural sweetness to them, and you can even let them ferment with their own natural yeasts (that’s the ashy stuff on the outside of the grapes) into a nice wine.

Cherry tomatoes and garlic from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cherry tomatoes and garlic from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I just love this image of garlic framed by cherry tomatoes at Alm Hill Gardens. It just underscores how our farmers do not just work the soil and grow delicious things, but they are artists, too. And we get to enjoy the delicious rewards of their labors and creativity!

Clara Frijs pears from Booth Canyon Orchard. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Clara Frijs pears from Booth Canyon Orchard. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The summer of 2013 has been one for the record books. Warm, humid, prolific crop production with epic harvests, lots of thunder storms… and it is this last item that brought with it a dark, destructive side the likes of which we rarely see around here in summer. Sure, there were the lightening-caused fires. But the real trouble came with the deluges of rain, and worse yet, the hail. Not so much on this side of the mountains, but on the other side, along the eastern slopes of the Central and North Cascades. And some of the worst  damage was caused in northern Chelan and eastern Okanogan Counties, like up in the Methow Valley, where Booth Canyon Orchard is located. Between late spring freezes and late summer hail, they lost almost all of their various heirloom apple crops. That is why, when they returned to your Ballard Farmers Market this past Sunday, they came only with pears, and mind you, these are the pears that made it through the hail storms. So, if you loves you some Booth Canyon fruit, focus on their pears right now, like these Clara Frijs pears, above, and celebrate them. Cuz this year, they are among the chosen few, and the chosen few are invariably the most delicious. Enjoy them, and support Booth Canyon, too!

Nash's Best Carrots from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nash’s Best Carrots from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nash’s Organic Produce is famous for its carrots. So it’s no wonder they call them “Nash’s Best”. Sure, they produce lots of delicious veggies over in Dungeness. But these carrots are a thing to behold. They are so sweet. And right now, they are available in their iconic five pound bags right here at your Ballard Farmers Market!

Nectarplums from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Nectarplums from Collins Family Orchards. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Here is yet another installment from the Collins Family Orchards book of funky, hybridized stone fruit. These beauties are nectarplums. Yup, they are a cross betwixt plum and nectarine, and they are amazing! But they have a short-lived season, so enjoy them while you can!

Cheddar cauliflower & romanesco from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cheddar cauliflower & romanesco from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Curiously, in this prolific summer of 2013, another of the few crops that underperformed is the cauliflower family. So Oxbow Farm having this colorful cheddar cauliflower and this geometrically pleasing romanesco right now is something worth celebrating!

Kabocha and Red Kuri winter squash from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Kabocha and Red Kuri winter squash from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Woohoo! Winter squash from One Leaf Farm! These lovelies are kabocha (left) and red kuri winter squash. They both have such gorgeous textures and deeply sweet flavors, and when you roast them, you can even eat their skins. Oh, and be sure to toss the seeds in some olive oil, sprinkle them with a little salt, and roast them in a pie tin in the oven for a wonderful little salty, crunchy snack. Yup. Fall does begin tomorrow, alrighty!

Blueberries from Sidhu Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Blueberries from Sidhu Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This is the last week for blueberries from Sidhu Farms, and likely from all of our farms, as with the return of the rains and cooler weather, the berries are beginning to turn to mush on the bush. So again, enjoy them while you can, for one last time. Stock up and freeze a bunch to enjoy all winter!

Pickled jalapeños peppers from Purdy Pickle. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pickled jalapeños peppers from Purdy Pickle. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Purdy Pickle has a fresh supply of these gorgeous pickled jalapeño peppers that they got from Alvarez Organic Farms. These are the perfect compliment to so many thing, or just on their own. Enjoy!

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, July 24th: Sweet Corn & Spinach Together In July! Oh, the Wonders of the Non-Summer of 2011!

July 24, 2011

Sweet corn from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, just when I was about to give up on corn altogether this summer, along comes Alvarez Organic Farms with the first sweet corn of the season. And if that doesn’t give you hope, or at least something to keep living for, they have also begun harvesting watermelons and pickling cukes. Excited? Me, too! So, while you are excited, we would like you to take a moment right now, even before you head to your Ballard Farmers Market, to please remember to vote for your Ballard Farmers Market in the 2011 America’s Favorite Farmers Market Contest! And thank you.

Spinach from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

You know, in as much as the appearance of sweet corn this summer is a pleasant surprise, whereas any other year it would have be expected, another pleasant surprise, and a side benefit of our ridiculous weather, is that Boistfort Valley Farm still has spinach! Lots of it, in fact. Their radishes are about done, but hey, they should’ve been done over a month ago. And they’ve got some romaine lettuce that is the size of a small child! Go figure. And enjoy!

Blackberries from Hayton Berry Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Look, another crop of summer… finally. Blackberries are in at Hayton Berry Farms. I’m not even sure if the invasive, feral ones in the parks are even blooming yet. But the really good ones are here, now. So start making jams and pies, people!

Magda summer squash from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Magda summer squash from Alm Hill Gardens. This has long been my favorite summer squash. But this year, it just seems a little bit sweeter yet. Particularly these puppies, grown up in Whatcom County, in what is arguably the coldest part of the state right now, in the coldest summer ever. But hey, I’m a glass-is-half-full kinda guy. If a cold summer means I have to suffer with the best summer squash ever, so be it!

Blueberries from Sidhu Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Ah, blueberries from Sidhu Farms. Now we’re talkin’. The rest of the country is sweltering. Their crops are withered or flooded out. So it’s a little chilly and damp around here. We have blueberries!

White pearl onions from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Pearl onions from Full Circle Farm. Bacon from Skagit River Ranch. Green Beans from Alvarez Organic Farms. A match made in heaven. Fresh pearl onions have a very short season, and very few people grow them. You probably thought they only came in a can, didn’t you? Enjoy them now, while you can!

Vans cherries from Bill's Fruits. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Vans cherries, like these from Bill’s Fruits, are one of my favorite cherries. They have a deep, dark, delicious flavor. They don’t get all the hype of bings and Rainiers, but I’d choose them over those two any day of the week. Haven’t tried vans? What are you waiting for?!?

Yellow brandywine tomatoes from Billy's Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Billy’s Gardens is really hitting its stride now with heirloom tomatoes, like these yellow brandywine tomatoes. With their amazing selection of varieties, in every shape, size and color, you’ll find the perfect tomato for flavor, application and acidity just for you. Of course, that means lots of quality control testing. You’d better by some of each!

Romanesco from Growing Things Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey look, kids! Romanesco from Growing Things Farm. It’s the only vegetable that grows in fractals! Pretty cool, huh? Just check out those tight spirals. Of course, romanesco is not just another pretty face. A cousin of cauliflower, it can be used similarly. Sometimes, I just steam it and top it with fresh-grated parmesan. Or you can roast it in the oven, or even pan roast it with pancetta and bread crumbs.

Red Haven peaches from Pipitone Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

When you approach Pipitone Farms today to get yourself some of these red haven peaches, don’t go fondling them. They are carefully put into these protective trays for a reason. See, Jerry Pipitone picks them at the peak of ripeness, and then he puts them into these trays. Those are the only two times these peaches are touched before you get them. Perfectly ripe and juicy and sweet, and no bruises!

Squash blossoms from Stoney Plains. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Here’s a thought. How about we take some of these spectacular squash blossoms from Stoney Plains Organic Farm, and we stuff them with some fresh goat chevre from Silver Springs Creamery? Then we can pan-fry them. Nuff said.

Shortcake from Grateful Bread Bakery. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And let us finish off this week with these lovely little shortcakes from Grateful Bread Bakery. They are the perfect vehicle for all those berries you are getting every week. Again, nuff said.

There is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now. And please remember to vote for your Ballard Farmers Market in the 2011 America’s Favorite Farmers Market Contest!

Sunday, October 24th: Puget Sound Keta Salmon, Brussels Sprouts, Black Truffles, Gluten-Free Bread & A Rainbow Of Cauliflower!

October 24, 2010

Fresh Puget Sound keta salmon from Loki Fish. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Happy Sunday, all! Never mind the calamity you see outside your windows this morning, because your Ballard Farmers Market is about as well stocked as ever with a veritable cornucopia of fall deliciousness normally unheard of this late in the year. Like fresh Puget Sound keta salmon from Loki Fish. Yup. Keta salmon is quite versatile, and in this case, it is the only commercially viable salmon fishery still remaining on Puget Sound. And since you can actually easily walk from the Market to Puget Sound, you’ll agree: it doesn’t get much more local that this.

Concord grapes from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The grape harvest is very late this year, but here it is — concord grapes from Alm Hill Gardens. These sweet and quintessentially grape-flavored grapes are great as table grapes (complete with seed spitting!), or you can make your own grape juice or wine with them. And did I mention that grapes are loaded with anti-oxidants?

Brussels sprouts from Summer Run. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Brussels sprouts! Oh, happy day!!! How I have missed you, oh, mighty mini cabbages put on this earth to befuddle many and to enthrall those of us who appreciate their inextricable relationship with bacon, shallots and white wine… and Ciscoe Morris, of course. Congratulations to Catherine at Summer Run for winning this fall’s Brussels sprouts sweepstakes by having the first farm at your Ballard Farmers Market to harvest them.

Kohlrabi from Red Barn. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

I was just thinking that during my recent visit to Milwaukee, Wisconsin — a great city that has one of the most impressive local food scenes in the United States (Seattle having the most impressive, of course) — I had perfectly cooked local Brussels sprouts to accompany my local, grass-finished beef meatloaf at The Comet Cafe. But being a city of many Eastern Europeans, I also found myself enjoying dishes featuring kohlrabi at the Serbian restaurants I visited. Our farmers around here grow some absolutely magnificent kohlrabi, like that above from Red Barn, which we recently welcomed back to your Ballard Farmers Market with all manner of deliciousness. Perhaps if we could encourage some of our neighbors with great kohlrabi recipes to share them with us, the many of us who are intimidated by this unusual vegetable will give it a chance. If you’ve got a recipe to share, please use the comment field below send it to us. Thanks!

Fall flowers from The Old Farmer. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Our Hmong farmers are famous for the spectacular flower arrangements they make year-round. But I think I like the fall bouquets best of all. There is a vibrance and warmth to these beautiful blooms from The Old Farmer, don’t you think? Now, I know that you are not really thinking you want to bring fall into your home today, but I think one of these lovely bunches of floralrificness on your dining room table would take the edge off our first big storm of the season, don’t you?

Washington black truffles from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

These Washington black truffles from Foraged & Found Edibles pack an enormous amount of flavor in their little fungal bodies. And one of the easiest and most enjoyable ways I’ve eaten them is when Chef Seth Caswell of emmer&rye served them simply shaved over some Pasteria Lucchese pappardelle that had been tossed with butter. Delicious!

Gluten-free breads from Platypus Breads. Photo courtesy Platypus Breads.

Platypus Breads is back at your Ballard Farmers Market today with gluten-free breads worth seeking out. Lindsay took a well deserved break for a couple of weeks, but she’s back and baking up gluten-free breads which are — I will say it again until it sticks — moist and flavorful. Have you been looking for a gluten-free bread to add to your elegant dinner? Here it is!

White, green, cheddar and romanesco cauliflower from Growing Things. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cauliflower is in the house! (Okay, it’s in the Market. But if you bring it home with you, it will be in the house.) Again, here’s another crop that came to us oh, so late this year, but now that it is here, let’s celebrate it. Especially when it comes in so many varieties from our friends at Growing Things Farm. I’ve captured 4 kinds above — white, green, cheddar & romanesco, which is the only vegetable that actually grows in fractals! So get your cauliflower on, baby!

Herbs de Provence butter from Golden Glen Creamery. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The ladies up at Golden Glen Creamery got inspired by the recent visit to Seattle by the American Cheese Society, and they’ve started having fun with all sorts of flavors infused into their farmstead butter. They’ve got three new flavors on their table, including: Bittersweet Chocolate & Orange; Northwest Mushroom Trio; and Herbs de Provence (above). Enjoy!

There is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check the What’s Fresh Now! listings in the upper right-hand corner of this page for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now!