Posts Tagged ‘salad greens’

Speaking of Salad Mix

May 31, 2009

Many farms at Ballard Farmers Market offer salad mix, but no two mixes are the same. It is in salad mix that our diverse collection of farmers perhaps best get to express their creative sides and their personalities in greens.

Alm Hill Gardens has one of the earliest mixes of the year, and they even add flowers to it. In May, they added tulip petals. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Alm Hill Gardens has one of the earliest mixes of the year, and they even add flowers to it. In May, they added tulip petals. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Salad mixes can be mild or spicy, made entirely of various lettuces or with no lettuces at all. They are a fun and delicious way to get an incredible variety of flavors, textures, colors and nutrients while simultaneously getting a quick and easy salad that is elegant and beautiful. Sure, they cost a little more, but most at the Market are harvested by hand when the leaves are young and tender, requiring great care on the part of the farmers. The prices are more than fair, given the labor intensive nature of salad mixes, and besides, you have to do less work.

Michaele Blakely's special blend of greens make Growing Thing's spicy salad mix unique. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Michaele Blakely's special blend of greens make Growing Thing's spicy salad mix unique. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Many farms at Ballard Farmers Market now offer salad mixes. They include Alm Hill, Anselmo, Colinwood, Full Circle, Growing Things, Nash’s, and Stoney Plains. If you haven’t enjoyed a salad mix from the market before, what you get at the big box grocery store does not compare, so you should give it a try. And if you have been loyal to one salad mix, why not try a few others, just to mix it up. There ain’t a stinker in the bunch. Then, pick up some radishes, carrots, baby turnips, green onions and a little cheese, and you are ready to build the easiest and most delicious salad you have ever tasted.

Colinwood Farms' salad mix is big and bold with spicy mustards and bitter mizunas. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Colinwood Farms' salad mix is big and bold with spicy mustards and bitter mizunas. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Cellophane Salad Bags

April 22, 2009

Colinwood Farms from Port Townsend uses fully-compostable cellophane bags for its delicious salad mix. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Colinwood Farms from Port Townsend uses fully-compostable cellophane bags for its delicious salad mix. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Keeping the keeping of your greens green green is easy with Colinwood Farms from Port Townsend. They use fully compostable cellophane bags for their salad greens, which means that after that bag has reached the end of its life keeping your salad greens green, the bag itself remains green as you file it in your compost pile or stash it in your yard waste bin. Oh, by the way, Colinwood’s salad greens are a good thing, too!

Chickweed (a.k.a., “satin flower”)

April 11, 2009

Chickweed, or satin flower, at Nash's Organic Producer. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chickweed, or satin flower, at Nash’s Organic Producer. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chickweed (Stellaria media) is probably taking over your spring garden bed as you read this, but surprising to most people is that the stuff you are throwing in the compost pile is actually a nice, tasty, grassy and nutrient-rich spring treat with many culinary applications. Native to Europe, it has become a prolific invasive weed in North America. It gets its name from the fact that chickens love to eat it, and I have never met a cockatiel that could resist it. It’s like candy to them.

While chickweed has some medicinal uses, some advise caution in its ingestion due to its high nitrogen content.

For more information on chickweed, go to Wikipedia.

Recipes:

Miner’s Lettuce

March 13, 2009
Miners lettuce from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Miners lettuce from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Miner’s lettuce (a.k.a., Winter Purslane, Spring Beauty, or Indian lettuce) is a fleshy annual plant native to the western mountain and coastal regions of North America from southernmost Alaska and central British Columbia south to Central America.

It is common in the spring, and it prefers cool, damp conditions. It first appears in sunlit areas after the first heavy rains, though the best stands are found in shaded areas, especially in the uplands, into the early summer. As the days get hotter, the leaves turn a deep red color as they dry out.

The common name Miner’s lettuce refers to its use by California gold rush miners who ate it to get vitamin C to prevent scurvy. It can be eaten as a leaf vegetable. Most commonly it is eaten raw in salads, but it is not quite as delicate as other lettuces. Sometimes it is boiled like spinach, which it resembles in taste.

Miner’s lettuce is also cultivated.

For more information, go to Wikipedia.

Recipe for Simple Miner’s Lettuce Salad.