Posts Tagged ‘sugar snap peas’

Sunday, June 1: Sugar Snap Peas, Tomatoes, Strawberries, Cherries, Glorious Sunshine & The Return Of Boistfort Valley Farm!

May 31, 2014
80-11 Rainier cherries from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

80-11 Early Rainier cherries from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And the hits just keep on coming! Yes, those are Rainier cherries80-11 Early Rainier cherries, to be precise, from Lyall Farms. This variety ripens a good two weeks ahead of other Rainier cherries, and Lyall Farms gets another 7-10 days head start on other farms because of the location of their orchard in the warmest, sunniest micro-climate in the state. Add to that the fact that, after colder than average months of December, January, February, March & April, and lots of rain to start off May, May ended up with warmer than average temps and sunnier than normal skies! Go figure. But hey, who’s complaining? 75 and sunny, with Rainier cherries, on the first day of June in Seattle? That’s fine by me!

Sugar snap peas from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sugar snap peas from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

But wait! There’s more! Yes, these are sugar snap peas, I kid you not! I took this photo on Wednesday at our sister Wallingford Farmers Market, which just opened for the 2014 season. These peas are from our friends at Alvarez Organic Farms in Mabton, another of Washington’s warmest, sunniest micro-climates. And Alvarez has their first harvest of Detroit red beets this week, too, and green shallots!

Organic strawberries from Gaia's Harmony Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Organic strawberries from Gaia’s Harmony Farm. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

We’ll have strawberries today from at least three different farms, and perhaps as many as six! These are organic strawberries from Gaia’s Harmony Farm. This is the earliest we have had strawberries in your Ballard Farmers Market in years!

Fresh spinach from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Fresh spinach from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

After their brief annual mid-spring rest, the fields at Nash’s Organic Produce in Dungeness are roaring back to life again. This week, they have lots and lots of their amazing organic spinach for your dining pleasure, as well as freshly-milled buckwheat flour and more!

Hot house vine tomatoes from Magana Farms. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hot house vine tomatoes from Magana Farms. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Okay, now I’m just messing with, right? Nope! These really are tomatoes, grown in Washington, this year! They are hot house vine tomatoes from Magana Farms in Sunnyside, the aptly named town in the Yakima Valley that is also in one of those special micro-climates of which Washington has more than 200. Magana’s big hoop house greenhouse warms naturally using Ole Sol only. This is the same variety of tomato you see coming out of heated greenhouses just north of Bellingham in British Columbia much of the year, except they didn’t require fossil fuels to ripen, or a passport to get here, and you didn’t need a Big Box store, or a nameless, faceless corporate farm to bring them to you.

Lettuce from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Lettuce from Boistfort Valley Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey kids! Boistfort Valley Farm returns today to your Ballard Farmers Market, again… the earliest in years! In fact, this may be the earliest they’ve ever come in! And you can bet they’ll have lots of this gorgeous lettuce, some colorful radishes, some honey and maybe some artichokes, and much, much more.

Canned local albacore tuna in a variety of flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Canned local albacore tuna in a variety of flavors from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is the first Sunday of the month, and you know what that means? Yes, Fishing Vessel St. Jude is here today, with the finest albacore tuna you will find anywhere.

Collard greens from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Collard greens from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Yay! Collard greens are back, baby! I loves me some organic collard greens from Oxbow Farm in Duvall, preferably with some lovely jowl bacon from Olsen Farms, and some green garlic from Alm Hill Gardens. Yeah, baby! Oh, and guess what? Allen is back at Olsen Farms today, too. Could life get any better?

Julie from Four Sisters Chili Sauce. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Julie from Four Sisters Gourmet Sauce. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

With all these farmers and crops returning to your Ballard Farmers Market, we’re running out of room for many of our beloved food artisans. You’ll find many of them at our sister markets in Wallingford and Madrona all summer, though. Today, however, is the last day at Ballard until fall for Four Sisters Gourmet Sauces. So stock up today for the next few months, while you can!

Soda Jerk Truckster. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Soda Jerk Truckster. Photo copyright 2014 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And we finish off this week’s epistle with yet another first: the first ever vendor truck allowed inside your Ballard Farmers Market! That’s because the Soda Jerk Soda Truckster is only nine feet long, from bumper to bumper, soaking wet (as it was last week at this time), meaning it fits perfectly in a standard 10′ x 10′ vendor space. This adorable little fresh soda slinging, street-legal machine was made by Cushman in 1984, and it is the product, in part, of your generosity when you invested in Soda Jerk’s Kickstarter campaign last year. Pretty cool, eh?

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, June 2nd: Local Tuna, Hard Cider, More Strawberries, Spectacular Salad Mix, Glorious Green Garlic & Other Deliciousness!

June 1, 2013
Local albacore tuna loins from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Local albacore tuna loins from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wow! It’s already the first Sunday in June! Besides the fact that we are charging headlong into summer — and the fact that today’s weather actually feels like summer — it also means that today is tuna day! That’s right. Today, we get our monthly visit from Fishing Vessel St. Jude with their amazing albacore tuna. Better yet, they have a new catch of tuna today cut for you. See, they freeze their tuna at sea after catching it to preserve its quality. Then they cut and wrap it in loins and portions on land for Market. Wait, what? Portions? Yes! They will have, for the first time in months, those smaller portioned sizes many of us have been missing. See, one or two people cannot necessarily get through a 2-3 pound lion all by themselves, but the smaller portions of St’ Jude’s sashimi-grade albacore tuna are the perfect size for anyone!

Salad mix from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Salad mix from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

There are so many ways to enjoy local albacore tuna, and one of my favorites is to cut a few steaks off of a loin, pan-sear them simply with a little olive oil — they don’t need much, because of their abundant natural oils — salt, pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice, so they are mostly raw inside, and then lay them over the top of a big, beautiful salad. In fact, I did just that on Saturday night, using as my base some of this extraordinary spicy salad mixed, complete with edible flowers, from Colinwood Farms. A mix of lettuces, mustards, arugula, spinach, mizuna and more, and topped off with colorfully delicious edible flowers, I garnished it with some of Colinwood’s carrots, some pink beauty radishes and Japanese wax turnips from One Leaf Farm, and some garlic chives from Children’s Garden. Yeah, baby!

Hard ciders from Eaglemount Cidery. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hard ciders from Eaglemount Wine and Cider. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Eaglemount Wine & Cider has returned to your Ballard Farmers Market on a regular basis now, and we couldn’t be more excited! Eaglemount and Finnriver Farm & Cidery now both bring excellent artisan ciders and fruit wines to you every Sunday from the Jeffereson County on the Olympic Peninsula — a region becoming a center for Washington’s burgeoning old-world cider-making industry. Grab a bottle or two today, and get a taste of one of the oldest forms of food preservation!

Strawberries from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Strawberries from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

More strawberries! Woohoo! These lovelies are from Alm Hill Gardens (a.k.a., Growing Washington) from up on the Canadian Border in Everson. They just started harvesting them a week ago, so numbers are still a little on the low side. You’d better get here early, if you want some today. But never fear. By this time next week, we’ll have at least six farms in your Ballard Farmers Market with strawberries! (BTW, Sidhu Farms has also started harvesting strawberries, and will have some today.)

Red leaf lettuce from Summer Run Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Red leaf lettuce from Summer Run Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Got lettuce? Summer Run Farm does! This is some of their gorgeous, and humongous, red leaf lettuce. Their heads of lettuce are so big, they are often twice as big as your own head (or two-thirds as big as mine)! So, get your lettuce on today at your Ballard Farmers Market!

Japanese wax turnips from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Japanese wax turnips from One Leaf Farm. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Hey, look! It is some of those aforementioned Japanese wax turnips from One Leaf Farm. They are as tasty as they are beautiful. I love to eat them raw, like a radish, on their own, or sliced up in a salad. Or you can do a quick sauté on them. And don’t forget to toss in those greens when you sauté them. You are getting two veggies for the price of one, so don’t waste those greens, people! They also have some awesome spicy salad mix of their own, plus collard greensfrisee and more!

Sugar snap peas from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Sugar snap peas from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It is sugar snap pea season, folks, and our buddies at Alvarez Organic Farms have a ton of these sweet, crunchy and delicious spring treats just waiting for you to devour them. Throw them into your salad. Dip them in some hummus from House of the Sun. Munch them on their own at the beach, right out of the bag. Lightly sauté them. You cannot go wrong. Enjoy!

Artisan bread loaves from Grateful Bread Bakery. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Artisan bread loaves from Grateful Bread Baking. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

While you are having your picnic at the beach and inhaling an entire bag of sugar snap peas, or you are enjoying your big, beautiful salad topped with tuna, you will need some of this magnificent artisan bread from our friends at Grateful Bread Baking. Oh, and be sure to pick up some butter from Golden Glen Creamery, or some fresh goat cheese from Twin Oaks Creamery to smear on it, while you’re at it!

Green garlic from Pa Garden. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Green garlic from Pa Garden. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Whatever you are roasting, sautéing, grilled — eating — this time of year, you must add some green garlic to the mix! Green garlic is the immature form of the garlic heads we will see later in the summer. Farms like Pa Garden thin their garlic fields this time of year to allow their garlic to be able to bulb out, and they bring the green garlic they thinned out to market for us to enjoy. You can eat the whole thing, as long as the greens are still green and you’ve cleaned it thoroughly. Cut it up like you would a green onion or scallion and toss it in the pan with your favorite greens, or in with your veggies before they go in the oven, and douse it with some olive oil and grill it alongside your protein. Yummers!

Whole grains from Nash's Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Whole grains from Nash’s Organic Produce. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Looking for some local whole grains to mill for flour, roll for cereal, or cook whole for a lovely base or side to many recipes? Nash’s Organic Produce has whole grain red wheat and whole grain rye available for you right now. They also have it milled into flour, so you don’t have to do all the work! Nash’s works very closely with WSU organic grain researcher Dr. Stephen Jones, and they are helping him with field trials of various grains, to identify those that will grow best here in Western Washington. See, it used to be, before the advent of modern industrial agriculture, that all grain was local, and each community relied upon the grains that grew in their region. That’s what folks like Nash’s and Dr. Jones are striving to return us to. Pretty cool, eh?

Tummy Tonics from Firefly Kitchens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Tummy Tonics from Firefly Kitchens. Photo copyright 2013 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Whether you use them as a cocktail mixer, to dress a salad or enhance your slaw, or you just like to ingest it by the shot glass, your palate and your body will love Firefly Kitchens‘s line of Tummy Tonics. These tonics are actually the residual juices left over from the fermenting process when they make their award-winning krauts and kimchis. When they bottle them, they also bottle the  brine left at the bottom of the fermenting vat. There isn’t a lot of this stuff, so you can pretty much only get it here at the Market. Try some today. You can thank me later!

There is plenty more local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Please remember bring your own bags every Sunday, as Seattle’s single-use plastic bag ban is now in effect. Also, please take note of our new green composting and blue recycling waste receptacles throughout your Ballard Farmers Market, and please make an effort to use them correctly. Each container has what’s okay to put in it pictured right on the lid. Please do not put the wrong materials in, because that drives up the cost of recycling and composting, and it can result in the entire container being sent instead to a landfill. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Sunday, June 3rd: Strawberries, Sugar Snap Peas, Cherries, Broccoli, Morels & Big Honkin’ Heads of Lettuce!

June 3, 2012

Strawberries from Billy’s. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s been a tough week for our community. The entire city of Seattle could use a hug right about now. We at your Ballard Farmers Market will endeavor to do just that, in the form of our weekly local food, arts and music community happening on Old Ballard Avenue. We welcome you to come and mix and mingle, get some nourishment for your body and your soul, and share some love with each other here in the People’s Republic of Ballard. Let’s get the love started flowing with some spectabulous strawberries from Billy’s Gardens in Tonasket. Billy’s returned to your Ballard Farmers Market for the 2012 season just last week. They’ve also got some amazing wild arugulafresh cut herbs and other goodies.

Sugar snap peas from Magana Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

It’s sugar snap peas season! Woohoo!!! Now, if that doesn’t put a smile on your face… These beauties are from Magana Farms from over in Sunnyside. They are crisp, sweet and delicious, and you will want to get twice as many as you think you’ll need. Why? Because you are going to eat so many of them before you even get home!

Burlat cherries from Lyall Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Say what?!? Cherries? Yuppers! These are burlat cherries from Lyall Farms. Burlats are the first cherries to come into season each year, and where Lyall grows them in Prosser, they get a 10-14 day jump on the rest of the state with their harvest. That’s why  Lyall always has them first. And don’t think because they are early or an unusual variety that they aren’t good. Burlats rock!

Broccoli from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Chopping broccoli… Oh, yeah, baby! Broccoli from Oxbow Farm. It’s like love in a vegetable! You know, I love Oxbow’s amazing tomato plants — few offer better — but I live for Oxbow’s veggies. And it’s not just broccoli they’ve got now. Their collard greens are also absurdly good. If you’ve never tried them, you must. They are sweet, delicious and tender, and they are loaded with nutrients. I love just sauteing them with a little green garlic, which they also have now, and some nice, smoky bacon from Sea Breeze, Olsen or Skagit River. Now, that’s living!

Wild morel mushrooms from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Wild morel mushroom season finally arrived, about a month late, but hey, it’s here now, right? And Foraged & Found Edibles has ’em. Lots of ’em! There are endless ways to enjoy morels, but my favorite this time of year is to cut them into rings and toss them with asparagus, green sweet onions and green garlic from Alvarez Organic Farms, some olive oil, salt and pepper in a big baking dish and roast the lot in a 425 degree oven until the asparagus is just tender. You get the sweetness of the asparagus and the onions, the mild garlicky flavor of its immature form, and the earthiness of the morels. Serve it as a side to some fresh king salmon or halibut from Wilson Fish, and some fresh artisan bread from Tall Grass Bakery, and you’ve got a simple, serious meal!

Kids tamales from Patty Pan Grill. Photo courtesy Patty Pan Grill.

Did you know that our own Patty Pan Grill recently introduced tamales made especially for kids? They’re half the size of their adult counterparts, and one variety has just cheese, while the other has a very simple, mild bean filling. They are available hot and ready to eat at the Market and in convenient packs to take home. “Just the thing for those parents on the verge, desperate to come up with an easy meal that isn’t full of processed garbage,” says Devra. Oh, and they are also offering a free small serving of their market-fresh vegetables along with any kids’ menu item.

Purple kohlrabi from Stoney Plains Organic Farm. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Stoney Plains Organic Farm down in Tenino always seems to be the first with many crops each year, and they are now with this purple kohlrabi. It can be steamed, sautéed, eaten raw with some onion dip, or find the nearest Eastern European to give you some stellar recipes! Oh, and they’ve also got lamb’s quarterepazote and a late resurgence of miner’s lettuce right now, too. Try to find any of these on any other tables in the Market!

Jon from Summer Run Farm holds heads of red leaf lettuce bigger than his own head! Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

No, Jon from Summer Run Farm does not have a tiny head. It’s just that Summer Run grows ginormous heads of red leaf lettuce. Seriously. Just look at these suckers. They are easily twice the size of his head. Indeed, it is these magnificent specimens of leafy deliciousness for which Summer Run is famous. But you might need to bring a trailer with you today to get one of them home with you!

Split farro from Bluebird Grain Farms. Photo copyright 2012 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Bluebird Grain Farm’s cracked farro makes for some amazing porridge. Or use it as a polenta. Heck, all their heirloom grain products are fantastic and nutrient dense. They mill their flours, cereals and mixes fresh before each Market, so they are at their peak of flavor and goodness when you get them, unlike so many bags of denuded flours in the Big Box Store that have been sitting in warehouses for months and have turned rancid. Bluebird makes its monthly visit to your Ballard Farmers Market today, so stock up!

Cans of albacore tuna from Fishing Vessel St. Jude. Copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Also making its monthly visit to the Market today is Fishing Vessel St. Jude with its incomparable albacore tuna products. They catch their tuna off the coast of Washington as the adolescent albacore swim south from their spawning grounds in the cold waters of the North Pacific to enjoy a leisurely adulthood in warm tropical waters. Because of their youth, this tuna is very low in heavy metals. Because they’ve been living in cold water, this tuna is very high in beneficial omega-fatty acids. Oh, and it is the best tuna you’ll ever taste, too! They’ve got it cannedfrozen freshsmokedjerkiedloxed and a few other ways, just to mix it up.

Hey, there is plenty of local deliciousness waiting for you today at your Ballard Farmers Market. Just check What’s Fresh Now! for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.

Sunday, June 5th: Of Sunshine, Sugar Snap Peas, Carrots & Lotsa Lettuce!

June 5, 2011

Memorial Day Sunday was a beautiful, sunny, busy day at your Ballard Farmers Market. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

This past Sunday, big, happy crowds enjoyed a sunny, mild Ballard Farmers Market on Memorial Day Weekend. And Ballard faithful, please know that our farmers appreciate your patience and understanding with how late all the crops are this year, due to our absurdly long, cold, seemingly endless — until this weekend, anyway — winter. But there now appears to be a light at the end of that long, dark tunnel, and it may not be the headlamp of an oncoming train after all! Yesterday, we recorded the warmest temperatures in Seattle since, well, last Labor Day Weekend. Babies were conceived and born in that stretch on time! Yikes!!! But with this burst of warm, sunny weather, we will finally, it seems, see an acceleration in the growth of local crops. Read on, and celebrate the return of a few overdue favorites! And while you are at it, please vote for your Ballard Farmers Market in the 2011 America’s Favorite Farmers Market Contest, which launched this past week. And tell your friends and family! Use that Facebook and Twitter account of yours for something productive! We came in fourth last year. With your help, this year, we’re gonna win it all!

Sugar snap peas from Alvarez Organic Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

So, did I lie? Yes, this is a photo I took yesterday at Georgetown Farmers Market of fresh sugar snap peas from Alvarez Organic Farms. I did some quality control testing on these — you know, because I care some much about you and all that — and I can vouch. These puppies are sweet and crunchy and delicious, and if you plan to do anything else with them aside from eating them right out of the bag before you even get home today, you will need to buy yourself twice a many as you think you’ll need! Just get there early, as this is the first harvest. They will run out.

Red summer crisp lettuce from Oxbow Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Lettuce Exhibit #1: Red summer crisp lettuce from Oxbow Farm. Beautiful. Refreshing. Delicious. Nuff said.

Carrots from Stoney Plains Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Here’s another crop we’ve been longing for: carrots! Woohoo!!! Oh, happy day! Ding, dong! Do I really need to go on and on? I don’t think so. But beeline it to Stoney Plains today first thing to get a bunch for yourself. If you’re that guy that rolls into the Market all bleary-eyed at 2:17 p.m., you will not find these!

Butterhead lettuce from Red Barn. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Lettuce Exhibit #2: Butterhead lettuce from Red Barn Farm. Magnificent on sandwiches. Terrific in salads. Great for wraps. Just plain lovely.

Ravishing radishes from Full Circle Farm. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Radishes are bursting out all over the Market now, and while they’ve been around a few weeks now, and as such aren’t quite as exciting as carrots and peas (or is that peas and carrots?), they still are delightful, colorfully, crunchy, spicy little jewels, are they not? When it finally gets hot, they will disappear. So enjoy them now, good people of Ballard. March on over the Full Circle Farm and rack ’em up!

Luscious lettuces from Colinwood Farms. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Lettuce Exhibit #3: Red & green leaf lettuces, adorned adoringly with nasturtiums from Colinwood Farms. I look at this wonderful display of lettucelisciousness, and I can’t help but wish for a nice dressing for it, and a really big fork!

Goose Tongue sea grass from Foraged & Found Edibles. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

From the “cool, wild stuff” category, how about some Goose Tongue salty sea grass from Foraged & Found Edibles? This is some tasty, salty stuff folks. Honestly, I haven’t quite figured out how to use it yet, but I am certain that amongst the good people of Ballard, there are more than a few who can give me some tips. Weigh in with your tips for enjoying Goose Tongue sea grass using the comments form. Thanks!

Romaine lettuce from Alm Hill Gardens. Photo copyright 2011 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Lettuce Exhibit #4: Romaine lettuce from Alm Hill. Imagine the BLTs. Ponder the lettuce wraps. Heck, grill it! In the immortal words of Eric Clapton, “It’s all right, it’s all right, it’s all right… romaine!” (And no, I’m not sorry.)

Shaving kit from Brown & Butterfly. Photo copyright 2010 by Zachary D. Lyons.

And now, a pitch for your favorite father, even it that turns out to be someone else’s. Father’s Day is coming up in just two weeks. Show your favorite dad that you put some thought into your annual “thanks for being a great dad” acknowledgement gift. Get him a new shaving kit that is locally made! Brown & Butterfly’s shaving soap is peerless. Heck, I use it exclusively, and you all know how handsome I am! Besides, using shaving soap and a brush eliminates the need for dad to use shaving foams from aerosol cans that create waste and release sketchy gases.

There is much more waiting for you at your Ballard Farmers Market today. Just check the What’s Fresh Now! listings in the upper right-hand corner of this page for a more complete accounting of what is in season right now.