Posts Tagged ‘vendor’

Loki Fish Returns

May 2, 2009

Loki Fish, which makes its home at Ballard's Fishermen's Terminal, back at Ballard Farmers Market. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Loki Fish, which makes its home at Ballard's Fishermen's Terminal, back at Ballard Farmers Market. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Loki Fish, whose boats are based right here in Ballard at Fishermen’s Terminal, returned to Ballard Farmers Market on Sunday, May 3rd.

 

Loki Fish frozen salmon fillets. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Loki Fish frozen salmon fillets. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Loki Fish harvests wild salmon in both Southeast Alaska and Puget Sound waters. Depending on the time of year, Loki may have king, sockeye, coho, pink and/or keta salmon species available for sale.

 

 

Loki Fish offers a wide variety of wild salmon products. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Loki Fish offers a wide variety of wild salmon products. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Currently, Loki has fresh frozen pink, coho and keta fillets, and whole pink, coho and sockeye. It also has jerkied, smoked and lox salmon, as well as salmon spread and ikura, a salted salmon roe. And Loki has salmon sausage and salmon patties, too.

 

 

Loki salmon sausage and patties. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Loki salmon sausage and patties. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Loki expects to have fresh Alaskan salmon available at the market in late June.

 

For more information on Loki, go to lokifish.com.

Communi-Tea Kombucha

April 16, 2009

Kombucha is the Western name for sweetened tea or tisane that has been fermented using a macroscopic solid mass of microorganisms called a “kombucha colony”.

Communi-Tea Kombucha is sold in earth-friendly reusable bottles. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Communi-Tea Kombucha is sold in earth-friendly reusable bottles. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

The recorded history of this drink dates back to the Qin Dynasty in China (around 250 BC). The Chinese called it the “Immortal Health Elixir,” because they believed Kombucha balanced the Middle Qi (Spleen and Stomach) and aided in digestion, allowing the body to focus on healing. Knowledge of kombucha eventually reached Russia and then Eastern Europe around the Early Modern Age, when tea first became affordable to the populace. (For more information on the history of kombucha and more, go to Wikipedia.)

Communi-Tea Kobucha comes to the Market by bicycle power. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Communi-Tea Kobucha comes to the Market by bicycle power. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons.

Communi-Tea has Washington’s first WSDA-licensed kombucha facility. The reuse their bottles and use an electrically-assisted bicycle trailer for hauling and deliveries.

Bluebird Grain Farms

April 14, 2009

A display of Bluebird Grain Farms products at a Seattle Chefs Collaborative event in 2007. Photo copyright 2007 by Zachary D. Lyons.

A display of Bluebird Grain Farms products at a Seattle Chefs Collaborative event in 2007. Photo copyright 2007 by Zachary D. Lyons.

 On Sunday, April 26th, Ballard Farmers Market welcomes Bluebird Grain Farms. Bluebird will offer whole grains, flour, cereals, baking mixes and more grown, milled and packaged right on their farm.

Bluebird Grain Farm is nestled away in the Methow Valley of North Central Washington. The farm, owned by Brooke and Sam Lucy, is part a great resurgence of small-scale, regionally-based grain farms growing high quality grains suited to their local climates for their local markets.

While Bluebird grows a variety of grain and seed crops, including rye, soft white wheat, hard red wheat and flax, it specializes in the ancient grain called emmer, known as “the grain of the Fertile Crescent.”

Emmer is the oldest cultivated grain crop, with cultivation dating back 17,000 years. It is an ancient ancestor of modern day wheat. It is high in protein and low in gluten, and it is a very versatile grain. Kernels of emmer thought to be as much as 3,000 years old found in the tombs of the pharaohs in Egypt have been successfully sprouted. Emmer has been largely kept alive in modern cuisine by Italians, who call it “farro,” but it is beginning to make a resurgence in American cuisine. Emmer can be used whole in salads, soups, pilafs and risottos, as a flour for breads and pastas and cracked as a cereal.

For more information on emmer, go to Bluebird’s website, or Wikipedia.

Support Your Local Dairy!

April 1, 2009

Golden Glen Creamery produces a broad line of cow's milk dairy products. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons

Golden Glen Creamery produces a broad line of cow's milk dairy products. Photo copyright 2009 by Zachary D. Lyons

Golden Glen Creamery used to be one of those nameless, faceless dairy farms that sold to the local big dairy company. You know these companies well, as the big box grocery store near your house has a dairy cooler full of cartons of milk from them. You have no idea what farm’s milk is in that carton, or how they raised their cows. In fact, there may be the milk of dozens of farms in those cartons — certainly of thousands of cows.

Golden Glen got a better idea: it decided to market dairy products under its own farm name. Now it can control every aspect of its milk and dairy products production, and we reap the rewards. Milk from cows raised on real pasture, instead of a confinement barn, not only tastes different (and better), but it is also healthier, both for the cows and us. And if you compare milk from between local dairies, you can actually taste the difference in their pastures and in the breeds of their cows in the milk itself. 

Golden Glen produces cheese, sure, but it also produces butter, cream and milk, including chocolate milk. If you haven’t tried these market rarities, you don’t know what you’re missing. And perhaps one of the coolest things about Golden Glen is that it bottles its milk in returnable glass bottles! Glass better protects the integrity of the flavor of the milk, and it is much lighter on our environment, especially considering they reuse them.